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Recap of Bruins’ Stanley Cup appearances since 1972 06.01.11 at 10:16 am ET
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The Bruins will begin their first Stanley Cup finals since 1990 Wednesday in Vancouver. Their last appearance was in 1990. Their last title came in 1972.

The Bruins have been in five Stanley Cup finals since ’72, and WEEI looks back at all of them.

1974: Bruins vs. Flyers

The Bruins finished the 1973-74 regular season first in the East Division, with Phil Esposito, Bobby Orr, Ken Hodge and Wayne Cashman finishing 1-2-3-4 in scoring in the NHL. They were heavily favored against the Flyers, although the Flyers finished first in the West, just a point behind the Bruins.

The Bruins won Game 1 by a 3-2 count, with both Orr and Cashman scoring a goal and recording an assist. In Game 2, the B’s led 2-0 after one period thanks to goals by Cashman and Esposito, but three third-period Flyers goals ‘€“ two by center Bobby Clarke ‘€“ cost the Bruins the game and home-ice advantage.

The Flyers took Games 3 and 4 at the Spectrum, holding the Bruins scoreless after the first period of both Games 3 and 4.

The Bruins protected home ice with a 5-1 Game 5 victory thanks to two goals from Orr, but in Game 6, Rick MacLeish scored his 13th goal of the postseason for a 1-0 win and the title. Goalie Bernie Parent was named MVP of the playoffs.

1977: Bruins vs. Canadiens

Although the third-seeded Bruins had won the Adams Division during the regular season, they were no match for the top-seeded, defending champion Canadiens in the 1977 finals. The Canadiens outscored the Bruins 16-6 in the four-game sweep.

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Read More: Bobby Orr, Bruins, Canucks, Phil Esposito
Andy Brickley on D&C: ‘I expect to get Tampa’s best game of this series’ 05.25.11 at 10:28 am ET
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NESN hockey analyst Andy Brickley joined the Dennis & Callahan show Wednesday morning to offer his views on the Eastern Conference finals. The Bruins are in Tampa for Game 6 Wednesday night, holding a 3-2 series lead. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

“I think the Bruins have the edge,” Brickley said. “I guess there’s a piece of them that says, ‘Look, even if we don’t win this game, we still have Game 7. We play it on home ice. We know that we’ve beaten this team three times. We’re confident. We’re coming off a victory. We’ve shown that we’re a bigger, more physical, stronger team when we execute the way we’re supposed to play. We felt that we were a deeper more balanced team coming into this playoff series.’

“So, I think the advantage goes to Boston. They feel they have another level to their game that they haven’t reached yet. They really haven’t put together that proverbial, perfect 60 minutes. They feel that if they do that, there won’t be a Game 7.”

However, Brickley predicts there will be another game in this series Friday night. “I originally said it was going to be Boston in seven … and I’m going to stand by that,” he said. “I like Boston tonight, I think they’re going to play well. But I expect to get Tampa’s best game of this series.”

Lightning coach Guy Boucher will return Dwayne Roloson to goal after giving him a break in Game 5. Brickley said he agrees with Roloson starting. “I was more surprised that he actually played Mike Smith, to be honest with you,” Brickley said. “As well as Smith has played in this series, I felt that that trust between GM, coach and goaltender when they acquired Roloson was for this purpose, was to play the biggest games, the biggest moments. I thought last game was one, and certainly tonight is another.”

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Read More: Andy Brickley, Bobby Orr, Dwayne Roloson, Mike Smith
Ray Bourque on D&C: Defensively, Zdeno Chara is ‘one of the best that’s ever been’ at 7:56 am ET
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Legendary Bruins defenseman Ray Bourque stopped by for a chat with Dennis & Callahan Wednesday morning during a charity benefit for the Massachusetts Soldiers Legacy Fund at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in Boston. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

Asked if the Lightning have a psychological edge over the Bruins in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals Wednesday night because they are the more desperate team, Bourque said: “I think it brings the best out of you, so I’d say yes. But the flip side of that, the Bruins are kind of a good counter-puncher kind of a team.

“Sometimes when you come out with that kind of energy or intensity, you might try to do too much and make mistakes and counter and maybe take advantage of those mistakes and go down early in the game, like you saw in Game 4 in Tampa. That’s what happened. It’s not that the Bruins played an incredible first period and came out of that period up 3-0. It’s Tampa that made some mistakes, and the Bruins capitalized on it. So, a game like tonight, you could see that happening again.”

Should the Bruins finish off the Lightning, the challenge in the Stanley Cup finals would be enormous. “Vancouver’s going to be very tough,” Bourque said. “That’s going to be by far their toughest series.”

Bourque said no matter how the season ends this year, the future looks bright for this Bruins team. “I think it’s a very good team with a great goalie, and a team that’s only going to get better, I think, in years to come,” he said. “And experiencing what they’re experiencing this year in the playoffs, the growth of some of these players is going to be tremendous.”

Asked where Zdeno Chara rates among the best Bruins defensemen ever ‘€” a list that includes Bourque and Bobby Orr ‘€” Bourque was highly complimentary of the Czech standout.

“I think defensively he’s better than both of us,” Bourque said. “He’s a shutdown D that is like no other in the league. I’ll tell you that any player playing against him ‘€” you’re not hearing much about [Martin] St. Louis or [Vincent] Lecavalier because of Zdeno. That’s why.

“Defensively, he’s the best, and one of the best that’s ever been because of his size and his strength and his reach. I mean, this guy’s 7 foot on skates and his reach is incredible. You just watch him, like Inspector Gadget all of a sudden ‘€” bang, that stick comes out, and it’s amazing.”

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Read More: Bobby Orr, Ray Bourque, Tim Thomas, Zdeno Chara
Shawn Thornton used the All-Star break to boost his celebrity in a different way 03.03.11 at 12:33 pm ET
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In case you live under a rock, Shawn Thornton‘s celebrity has increased to a national scale this week with the debut of the Dropkick Murphys music video for their latest single, “Going Out in Style.”

In the video, which also features Bobby Orr and Milan Lucic, Thornton sits at the bar taking fake shots of Jameson with NESN’s Heidi Watney. The video premiered Tuesday on RollingStone.com.

“It was fun. It was awesome. It came out really well, so I was happy,” he said. “I never thought I’d be on the Rolling Stone website. It’s a pretty cool experience.”

The video was shot on the last day of the All-Star break. Thornton laughed at the notion that given his All-Star candidacy at the time of booking (a career-high seven goals), the band was taking their chances in trying to secure his availability for that weekend.

“[Dropkick Murphys bassist and singer Ken Casey] called me last minute and asked if I could do it,” Thornton said with a laugh.

If there’s one thing that stands out about the video, it’s that Lucic appears to get the short end of the stick. Orr gets to sing along, Thornton gets to come off as a tough guy at the bar, and Lucic “is beating up a kid” (Thornton’s words). The video ends with Casey’s son throwing a snowball at Lucic who then chases after the youngster.

“It was pretty funny though. I liked his part.” Thornton said. “It was a good video though, I liked it.”

Click here to see the video, which contains explicit lyrics.

Read More: Bobby Orr, Milan Lucic, Shawn Thornton,
Latest Dropkick Murphys video features Bruins Bobby Orr, Shawn Thornton, Milan Lucic 03.01.11 at 6:19 pm ET
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Rolling Stone premiered the music video for the Dropkick Murphys’ latest single, “Going out in Style,” and it unsurprisingly featured a Boston theme. The Boston-based group’s newest video featured the likes of Bobby Orr, Shawn Thornton and Milan Lucic.

Orr smiles at the camera and throws snowballs, while Thornton can be seen at the bar taking shots with NESN’s Heidi Watney. Lucic sings along and falls victim to a snowball. Red Sox third baseman Kevin Youkilis is also in the video singing along.

The song contains some choice lyrics, so we’ll link to it rather than posting the video.

Read More: Bobby Orr, Milan Lucic, Shawn Thornton,
Orr doesn’t think Hall will slip past Oilers 06.15.10 at 1:06 pm ET
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According to HockeyJournal.com’s Douglas Flynn, Bruins legend Bobby Orr thinks the Bruins are going to get a “hell of a player” with the second overall pick in the NHL draft next Friday. Just not his client.

Orr, who along with Paul Krepelka and Rick Curran, represents Windsor Spitfires left wing Taylor Hall, thinks like many that the Edmonton Oilers will ignore NHL Central Scouting’s assertion that Tyler Seguin is the top player and will instead pick Hall.

‘€œHall is the best player,” Orr told Flynn. “Although I do represent him, I can guarantee he’€™s a hell of a player. I don’€™t know if I’€™ve seen a kid compete like this kid competes ‘€“ every night, every shift. To him, it doesn’€™t matter the score, he competes. He’€™s a heck of a player and I would obviously love to see him here in Boston, but I’€™m not sure that’€™s going to happen.’€

Orr feels the Bruins could move up for Hall, but that the Oilers likely want Hall and could command a hefty package to swap picks.

‘€œI don’€™t think anybody knows yet,’€ Orr said. ‘€œBut I think you’€™ve got to take the best player, unless a deal can be made to lay off that best player.

‘€œAnd nobody knows for sure yet. Edmonton’€™s not saying. But it would have to be a great deal I would think to make the trade for that, but I don’€™t know.’€

A big deal has been made of the numbers that Hall and Seguin, as Hall wears No. 4 as a tribute to Orr while it was Seguin’s hope to wear No. 19 for the Plymouth Whalers in honor of Steve Yzerman, the Hall of Fame center to whom he is compared.

Read More: 2010 NHL Draft, Bobby Orr, Taylor Hall, Tyler Seguin
‘The Goal’ to stand forever outside TD Garden 05.10.10 at 3:17 pm ET
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It is funny how the 40th anniversary season of the Bruins 1970 Stanley Cup Championship has worked out. Every time the team has planned to bring back the luminaries from that team — Bobby Orr, Derek Sanderson, Johnny Bucyk — the Bruins were about to play their biggest game of the season.

The first time the Bruins brought back the alumni was for an on-ice celebration of the 1970 team on March 18 — the day awaited by Bruins fans as the day that the team could get back at Matt Cooke and the Pittsburgh Penguins for Cooke’s hit on center Marc Savard that gave him a Grade 2 concussion and almost immediately elicited a change in NHL rules regarding hits to the head from behind. Orr and company were gracious to Cooke and the Bruins amidst a stretch where Boston was not playing its best hockey and Bruins fans were clamoring for blood. The game registered NESN’s highest regular season rating for a Bruins game in history.

On Monday the Bruins unveiled a statue at the west entrance to TD Garden of Orr’s “The Goal” — the game-winner that won the 1970 Stanley Cup Championship over St. Louis. It just so happens that the Bruins once again are playing their biggest game of the season — Game 5 of the Eastern Conference semifinals against the Flyers with a chance to clinch the series and move to the conference finals.

“The Broad Street Bullies? I have a lot of memories of playing against them,” Orr said. “That was a tough team, a hard working team. They were well coached with Freddy Shero, Bernie Parent in goal. All-star goalie. They had skill, they had top defensemen. Even their tougher guys could play the game.”

In a ceremony to unveil the statue the associated Bruins alum were present along with other Boston personalities such as Tim Wakefield and David Ortiz as well as the team’s owner Jeremy Jacobs and Jacob Wentzell, President of TD Garden.

The statue  looks almost implausible as it stands with Orr flying through the air with no support for the bronze, is 110 percent life size and was sculpted by Harry Weber.

“It is cantilevered, which just means that means that it is sticking out from that one toe,” Weber said of the construction. “The reason we were able to do that is that stainless steal goes all the way down from the base of the ground up through that spray of ice, all the way through his foot, all the way through him, all the way up to the stick. It is like a giant jungle gym all the way up through the statue otherwise bronze wouldn’t carry the weight.”

After the ceremony Jacobs was asked about Orr’s departure from the Bruins, which has caused the owner’s name to have been dragged through the mud since he purchased the team in 1975. Orr left the Bruins despite a lucrative contract offer from the team after agent Alan Eagleson allegedly told the star defenseman that the Chicago Blackhawks had a better deal. Jacobs was mum, as he has been for the last 35 years, on the specifics that led one of the greatest hockey players of all time away from Boston.

“I am not going there. That was back then. If I knew what I know now then it would have been a different story,” Jacobs said. “It was a snapshot in a time warp. I was young, he was young. It just didn’t unfold the way it should have. He came back here, maybe not as a player, but he came back here as a personality that is so important to this whole community. Let’s face it, it didn’t happen like it should have. He had issues, a young man following a dream and his advisors and it didn’t work out. But that was then.”

Read More: Bobby Orr, Jeremy Jacobs,
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