Big Bad Blog AT&T
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Boston Bruins’
Media roundup: National opinion starts to turn against Canucks 06.10.11 at 12:10 pm ET
By   |  3 Comments

With the Stanley Cup finals down to a best-of-three series, two countries’€™ worth of media can’€™t help but comment on the series.

The Toronto Star’€™s Dan Robson hasn’€™t enjoyed the pettiness and immaturity by both the Canucks and the Bruins, calling them ‘€œfifth-grade versions of themselves.’€

Wrote Robson: ‘€œThe Bruins and Canucks have gone classless-tit for gutless-tat all series long.’€

ESPN.com’€™s Pierre LeBrun, meanwhile, has focused on the games themselves, seeing Vancouver’€™s road losses to the Bruins by a combined score of 12-1 reflect numerous issues with the Canucks, ranging from poor goalie play to a lack of team confidence.

‘€œThey head home with their confidence shaken, their goalie perhaps rattled and their passionate fan base unquestionably believing 40 years of misery will continue with one more giant heartbreak headed their way,’€ LeBrun wrote Thursday.

Gord McIntyre, a writer for Vancouver-based newspaper the Province, wrote Friday that the media and much of the NHL wants to see the Canucks lose, that they have become the villains of the NHL. His article cited such examples as Versus commentator Mike Milbury calling Daniel and Henrik Sedin ‘€œThelma and Louise,’€ a Chicago reporter seeing a picture of Cher and saying ‘€œLuongo,’€ and Blackhawks center Dave Bolland saying the team played ‘€œsort of like a little girl.’€

Helene Elliot of the Chicago Tribune wrote Thursday that the Bruins’€™ success is based on Tim Thomas‘€™ success, and Thomas’€™ success is based on his ‘€œfeistiness.’€ Jackie MacMullan of ESPN.com wrote a similar article Thursday, but added that the Canucks don’€™t respect Thomas’€™ aggression and talent. MacMullan quoted Canucks defenseman Kevin Bieksa as calling Thomas ‘€œleaky,’€ and wrote that, according to the Canucks, simply shooting more will expose Thomas’€™ weaknesses.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, NHL, Stanley Cup Finals, Tim Thomas
GQ’s Jonah Keri: ‘No one wants’ Bruins to win 06.09.11 at 4:31 pm ET
By   |  10 Comments

In a piece written for GQ.com entitled “The Boston Bruins vs. The World,” noted sportswriter Jonah Keri has a simple but sharp message for the Bruins and their fans.

After spending a few paragraphs discussing the “We want the Cup” chant that has filled the TD Garden and discussing how every other NHL team wants a Stanley Cup, Keri writes, “But you, Bruins fans? No one wants you to have it.”

He notes that there are plenty of good reasons to root for the B’s. Among them are Tim Thomas‘s long journey to stardom, Alexandre Burrows‘s bite on Patrice Bergeron and Nathan Horton‘s season-ending concussion. But Keri still adds “You know what? We’re still not rooting for you.”

His main reasoning behind this thesis is that Boston fans complain of “The Drought,” the 39-year period since the B’s have lost won the Stanley Cup, when the Red Sox, Patriots and Celtics have all took home trophies in the last decade. Since Keri claims that all Bruins fans also root for these other squads, there should be no remorse for those who don the black and gold.

“You sound like the douchebag who [expletive] that, after the three-bedroom in Tribeca, the place in the Hamptons, the kids’ boarding school, the annual trips to Paris and Aruba, the four cars, and two alimonies, you’ve barely got enough left for that third bottle of Dom at Per Se,” Keri writes before concluding, “We feel for the 12 Bruins fans who’ve shunned the city’s other franchises and waited nearly 40 years for their shot. The rest of you? Prepare yourselves for heartbreak. Until the day after Vancouver wins the Cup, when you can watch your first-place Red Sox try to break Boston’s Three-Year Curse.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Jonah Keri, Nathan Horton, Patrice Bergeron
Claude Julien: ‘We’ve got to bring our game with us’ at 12:16 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

Default Player for embeding in WEEI.com columns and blogs.


brightcove.createExperiences();

Now comes the hard part.

The Bruins have turned the 2011 Stanley Cup finals upside down. They have overcome two remarkably heartbreaking losses in Vancouver by not just beating the Canucks on their Garden home ice but running the Sedin twins and the rest of the Western Conference champs right out of the building.

The Bruins dominated in every way possible, outscoring the Canucks, 12-1, in the two wins to even the series and turn it into a best-of-3.

Now, the Bruins have to carry that momentum with them on their cross-continent flight and translate it enough on the Rogers Arena ice on Friday night to give them a chance to win the Cup on that same Garden ice on Monday night.

How do they do it?

“I think we’ve got to bring our game with us, simple as that,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “We have to bring our game. That has to continue in Vancouver. It doesn’t matter where you are, you got to play the same way whether you’re at home or on the road.”

And that mean laying out the hits, doing everything possible to keep the aggressive Tim Thomas in his comfort zone between the pipes, and continuing an amazing run on the penalty kill.

In the two wins, the Bruins outhit the Canucks 67-58 and Thomas stopped a remarkable 78 of 79 shots on goal, primarily because he saw nearly every single one of them. That’s where it gets tricky. The Canucks will no doubt run more bodies at Thomas in front and the Bruins defenseman must continue to clear bodies away. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Alain Vigneault, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien
Rich Peverley does his best Nathan Horton and the Bruins are grateful at 1:09 am ET
By   |  Comments Off on Rich Peverley does his best Nathan Horton and the Bruins are grateful

On Wednesday night at TD Garden, as the Bruins took the ice for Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals against Vancouver, Rich Peverley had some extraordinarily large shoes to fill.

After all, Nathan Horton has done it all this postseason for the Bruins – especially in the clutch. There was the overtime winner in Game 5 against Montreal. There was the overtime winner in Game 7 against Montreal.

And there was game-winner against Tampa Bay in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals.

But Horton won’t be playing anymore this season. Peverley was moved up to the top line of David Krejci and Milan Lucic and responded with first and last goals of a 4-0 thumping of the Canucks to even the series at 2-2 going back to Vancouver.

Peverley wasn’t informed he was on the top line until just before the game.

“Just before warm-ups,” Peverley said when asked when he found out he was playing on the top line. “I had no idea who was going to go in there, if it was going to be me or [Michael Ryder]. Rydes took a lot of shifts with them too. [Tyler Seguin] was in there, too. Nothing is set in stone.

“I haven’t contributed as well as I think I could, offensively. Anytime you can help out, especially in this environment, you want to do so.”

Julien has experimented with different looks for his top line and came to the conclusion before Game 4 that Peverley was his choice.

“We had different looks,” Julien said. “We saw [Michael] Ryder go up there a few times as well when Rich was killing penalties. I said I’d use different players at that position. Pev’s got good speed. Their line had forechecks pretty well with Lucic on one side. We thought we’d keep that going. He still has pretty decent hands. We thought we would start with that. Michael is another guy who can fit on that line as well. Certainly Tyler [Seguin] was a consideration. His skill and speed level on that line at times also.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Canada, Claude Julien
Barry Melrose on M&M: ‘Boston has to win this game to have a chance of winning this series’ 06.08.11 at 2:45 pm ET
By   |  3 Comments

ESPN hockey analyst Barry Melrose joined the Mut & Merloni show Wednesday afternoon to talk about the Stanley Cup finals and Wednesday night’s Game 4. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

When asked if he would be sitting with the Green Men at the game, Melrose joked: “I stay away from the Green Men. I can’€™t even believe they got into the country. I’€™m a little embarrassed about letting those guys in.”

He added: “We keep al-Qaida out, but we let these two guys in? What’€™s that all about?”

Melrose said that the finger-taunting in Game 3 has helped made this series an exciting one. However, it may come back to bite Boston in Game 4.

“I think [Alexandre] Burrows should’€™ve been suspended,” Melrose said. “I said that from Day 1. I think that if he would’€™ve been suspended that would’€™ve put away the finger crap. But I like the finger stuff. I thought it was funny. I had some fun with it. It’€™s interesting. Five years from now when we’€™re talking about this series, what are we going to talk about? We’€™re going to be talking about that stuff with the fingers and [Milan] Lucic and Burrows and stuff like that. I have no problem with that. It’€™s interesting. But, the NHL doesn’€™t want it.

“Obviously, the referees are going to crack down tonight. They’€™re going to be reffing very close to their vest. I think that favors Vancouver. Boston’€™s got to be aggressive. They’€™ve got to be physical. And the referees are going to be told to call everything, so we might see a lot of penalties tonight.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Alex Burrows, Barry Melrose, Boston Bruins, Mark Recchi
Brad Marchand said the Bruins were ‘really looking to send a message’ 06.07.11 at 12:50 am ET
By   |  Comments Off on Brad Marchand said the Bruins were ‘really looking to send a message’

In one of the more physical, tense and nasty Stanley Cup final games in recent memory, the Bruins hammered the Canucks, 8-1, Monday night in Game 3 and now trail Vancouver, 2 games-to-1.

The physical play began with a shot to the head of Nathan Horton by Aaron Rome just over five minutes into the contest. Horton left on a stretcher after his neck was immobilized. He reported having feeling in all extremities and was taken to Massachusetts General for observation. The nastiness reached a new level in the third when Shawn Thornton was ejected via a 10-minute misconduct while three more Bruins followed. Rome was ejected along with three other Canucks in the third, as the Bruins poured it on with four goals in the second and four in the third.

“We had a good game but we were really looking to send a message and we wanted to get back in the series,” Brad Marchand said. “They had a pretty commanding lead there. We knew it was going to be a big game tonight and we were just hoping to get back in the series.

“Any playoff series it’s a battle out there. We’re fighting for something we wanted our whole lives. It’s going to be a battle every game. It’s going to look like that. I think it’s just going to get chippier as series goes on.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Aaron Rome, Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand
Gord Kluzak on D&C: Zdeno Chara in front of net ‘a waste of energy and time’ 06.06.11 at 11:04 am ET
By   |  Comments Off on Gord Kluzak on D&C: Zdeno Chara in front of net ‘a waste of energy and time’

NESN Bruins analyst and former defenseman Gord Kluzak called in to the Dennis & Callahan show Monday morning to discuss the Stanley Cup finals. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

Kluzak said that the Bruins could have won either of the first two games had they played slightly better.

‘€œI think they have had breakdowns at times that have really hurt,’€ Kluzak said. ‘€œI think if they get back to what they can do ‘€“ and the model is Game 7 vs. Tampa Bay ‘€” this thing is very winnable. I’m much more optimistic than I hear you guys were this morning.

“I don’t think Vancouver is as good as advertised. I’ve never been overly impressed with the Sedins. I think [Ryan] Kessler may be hurt, the way that [Johnny] Boychuk hit happened early on in Game 2. I didn’t think Kessler was the same player, and I think if you’re the Bruins you’re trying to be as physical as you can with him because he is the key, in my opinion. I think this is still very winnable. The Bruins obviously have to play near-perfect hockey, but I think they can do that.’€

Kluzak said two specific adjustments the Bruins should make is getting Zdeno Chara away from the net on the power play and including Rich Peverley on the Patrice BergeronBrad Marchand line.

‘€œChara up front in the power play is just a waste of energy and time,’€ Kluzak said. ‘€œLook at the way Milan [Lucic] scored his goal. It was a rebound in front. Well, that’€™s what the power play is all about. That’€™s why you need him out there, and it doesn’€™t help you to have the guy that you rely on the most in your own zone up front of the net on the power play when you have a guy that’€™s probably better at it and would be more suited to it.’€

Kluzak said he thought that Peverley’€™s speed ‘€œwould open the ice up a little bit more for Bergeron.’€

Kluzak said he did not think fatigue is an issue for Chara. ‘€œThis is a guy who rides 110 miles on a bike through the mountains every summer day,’€ Kluzak said. ‘€œThis guy is the best-conditioned athlete I think I’€™ve ever seen.’€

Despite Shawn Thornton‘s physicality, Kluzak said more playing time for the enforcer is not the answer for the Bruins.

‘€œThe guy you would have to take out of the lineup is [Daniel] Paille, and Paille is an outstanding penalty-killer,’€ Kluzak said. ‘€œHe’€™s executed that, and I think you really need that skill set. You don’€™t want to use your better offensive players in that penalty-killing situation.’€

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Gord Kluzak, Roberto Luongo, Stanley Cup Finals
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines