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Milt Schmidt meant more to Tim Thomas than Phil Kessel 10.29.10 at 1:14 am ET
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Don’t get Tim Thomas wrong. He still respects Phil Kessel.

It’s just that on this night – one to honor a man with 75 years of history with the Boston Bruins – it was more important for the goalie to focus on getting the win, not the lightning rod of the Hub’s hockey fans.

And focus is exactly what Thomas did, turning away all 20 shots over 60 minutes in posting his 19th career shutout – a 2-0 dispatch of the Toronto Maple Leafs before a fired-up TD Garden sellout crowd.

“Yeah, you know, it being Milt Schmidt night, the best thing we could do for him I think was to get a win, and so we were trying hard to get a good result,” Thomas said. “I mean, just listening to the accomplishments, that that man has had as part of the Bruins organization, and he deserved the win tonight, so we were focusing on that.

“Now as far as Phil Kessel goes, the other side of that coin there the you’€™re talking about, we’€™re not thinking about that We’€™re thinking about the two points. We needed the win. Especially we needed to bounce back after a loss, so we’€™re not thinking about individuals like that. At least, I’€™m not.”

That doesn’t mean Kessel didn’t have his chances. He had six shots on net, including one point-blank in the second period when Kessel came up the slot and took possession of a loose puck in front of Thomas.

“Oh, was it? On the other side? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I remember that,” Thomas recalled.

When you’re stopping players like Phil Kessel point blank, you’re likely putting up great numbers. And that’s what Thomas has been doing, ever since getting the start in the season’s second game.

He has two shutouts, including Thursday’s 2-0 win. He is a perfect 5-0 with a 0.60 goals against average. His save percentage is a near-perfect .980.

Is the best start he’€™s ever had?

“Well, probably statistically? I feel obviously that I’€™m playing good. The team is playing very well in front of me. They’€™re really helping me out with rebounds, screens, blocking in the screens, I mean. [Dennis] Seidenberg had as many saves as I did tonight, and that’€™s making it very helpful.”

The five straight wins to start a season is the best by a Boston goalie since Tiny Thompson went 6-0-0 in his first six games of the 1937-38 season.

Added coach Claude Julien, “Solid again. I think we can’€™t say enough about the way he’€™s played. What I liked about his game too, you know, they had some shots from the point and he did a great job of not giving any rebounds. He kept those inside of him. I thought he did a great job of smothering those loose pucks and just solid challenging and confident.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Milt Schmidt, NHL, Tim Thomas
Mike Milbury on D&C: ‘Don’t throw Tuukka in the 2-hole now’ 10.27.10 at 2:31 pm ET
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NESN hockey analyst Mike Milbury joined the Dale & Holley show Wednesday for his weekly hockey update and discussion of other hot topics regarding the Bruins. Milbury also talked about the latest debate, which has been the goaltender situation thus far in the season.

“It’s how to handle both of them, not just Tuukka [Rask],” Milbury said. “I don’t throw Tuukka in the 2-hole now just because [Tim] Thomas has had a good start. It looks like they’re going to battle for the top spot, and I think one of the things … is the schedule. I mean, they go overseas, they play two games, they get basically a full week off, they played three more and then they get four days off. There’s no rhythm for any of their players, not just the goaltenders.”

Following are highlights from the conversation. To hear the entire interview, visit the Dale & Holley audio on demand page.

Can we assume the hype we saw last night in Boston won’t be matched, but will at least be evident as Phil Kessel returns to the Garden with the Maple Leafs tomorrow night?

Yeah, it’ll be fun, and the Maple Leafs are winning their share of games, so it should be competitive. They’re not trading on the back end. I mean, they’re supposed to be strong on the blue line, but they’ll, they cough it up regularly, so there’ll be plenty of opportunities to score. [Jean-Sebastien] Giguere‘s been backstopping the goals against, so it’s been OK, but they’re a vulnerable team, but at least they’re playing with some vinegar, and so it should be a pretty good matchup.

If each goaltender starts roughly 40 games, what’s the best way to handle two goaltenders, and Tuukka, who’s been shaky lately?

That’s a great question. I mean, it’s how to handle both of them, not just Tuukka. I don’t throw Tuukka in the 2-hole now just because Thomas has had a good start. It looks like they’re going to battle for the top spot, and I think one of the things, before I try to answer that question, that has conspired against Rask and Thomas is the schedule. I mean, they go overseas, they play two games, they get basically a full week off, they played three more and then they get four days off. There’s no rhythm for any of their players, not just the goaltenders.

But once they get into the need of their schedule, you know, I think there’s plenty of room to let a guy run two, three or even four games in a row. But if you really want to keep the party going in terms of competition, once you get into five and six games in a row for one guy, you’re asking much from the other guy to just bounce back and be excellent in his first start.
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Read More: Boston Bruins, Mike Milbury, Tim Thomas, Tuukka Rask
Why Tim Thomas is a happy man 10.22.10 at 12:01 pm ET
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At the end of last year and in the playoffs, Tim Thomas wasn’t smiling that much. He was in pain from not playing and from bad hip that required labrum surgery in the offseason.

Fast forward five months and you have a spry 36-year-old goalie sliding easily from post to post, stopping 38-of-39 saves in a 4-1 win over the mighty Washington Capitals in the team’s first game of the season before a fired-up crowd at TD Garden. He is 4-0 to start the season, allowing only three goals while posting a 0.75 goals against and a .978 save percentage.

Why wouldn’t you be smiling?

“I felt good, I felt really good,” Thomas said. “My movement felt real good and maybe there was some rebounds, where there’€™s a different kind of on, where it just sticks to you and there’€™s no rebounds and stuff. I didn’€™t exactly have that tonight, so my D helped me out with the rebounds, but I had the movement and the speed. One of these days, you’€™ll have everything and one of these days I’€™ll play the puck the right way too.

“I think it’€™s been exceptional the last couple of weeks since, you know, I got back into the groove. I felt it coming in the early days of Czech and you know, it’€™s fun when you can move.”

Thomas even admitted he’s exceeded his own expectations in his recovery.

“For sure, and obviously, I couldn’€™t be happier with the way I’€™m feeling this far,” Thomas said. “You know, now I’€™ve just got to keep working hard and keep working in practice, and there’€™s ways that I can make it easier on myself. That will be my goal in practice.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, NHL, Tim Thomas
Capitals 4, Bruins 1 09.29.10 at 10:35 pm ET
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And finally, it’s off to Europe.

The 24 hours leading up to Wednesday night’s red-eye, 5 1/2-hour flight to Belfast, couldn’t have been more hectic for the Bruins.

They played Tuesday night in Washington and lost to the Capitals, 3-2, in a tense game that featured third-period rough-housing between Gregory Campbell and Alexander Ovechkin.

They hopped on a plane and had to come to Boston for the team’s annual media day Wednesday morning.

They then went home to finish up packing for a 12-day trip to Europe and came back to play the same Capitals team at TD Garden.

So it was hardly a surprise that in their final North American preseason tuneup before getting on a plane for Belfast, Ireland and their season opener on Oct. 9 in Prague, the Bruins dropped a 4-1 decision to the Capitals.

Tim Thomas saw his first action of the preseason and played all 60 minutes, allowing four goals on 24 shots. Niklas Backstrom scored the first two goals before the Capitals built their lead to 4-0 early in the third period.

Mark Recchi scored his first of the preseason midway through the third on a power play, with assists from Patrice Bergeron and Michael Ryder. The Bruins left immediately after the game for Logan Airport, where they caught a charter flight to Belfast. They will play an elite area team in Ireland on Oct. 3 before opening with the Phoenix Coyotes in a pair of games Oct. 9 and 10.

The Bruins finished their NHL portion of preseason with a 1-3-1 mark, while the Capitals, who did not travel superstar Alexander Ovechkin to Boston, remained perfect at 4-0-0 in preseason.

Read More: Alexander Ovechkin, Boston Bruins, NHL, Tim Thomas
First period summary: Capitals 1, Bruins 0 at 7:43 pm ET
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Tim Thomas faced six shots and stopped five as Nicklas Backstrom beat the veteran goaltender on a one-timer in front of the net midway through the period.

With teammate Tuukka Rask in sweats up in the press box halo looking on, Thomas looked solid, if not spectacular in his first preseason action this fall.

The Bruins managed just five shots on Capitals netminder Dany Sabourin.

The highlight of the period came two seconds in when Bruins center Gregory Campbell dropped the gloves with Capitals center Matt Hendricks. Just 24 hours earlier, Cambell got into it with Alexander Ovechkin as the two exchanged pleasantries at the Verizon Center.

Ovechkin cross-checked Campbell, who later came back at Ovechkin with a hard hit into the boards. The rough stuff continued and escalated in the third period.

Ovechkin didn’t make the trip so Hendricks was the stand-in and delivered the message at the earliest possible moment – the opening face-off.

As for the most anticipated talent in these parts since Joe Thornton, Tyler Seguin centered the line with Blake Wheeler and Michael Ryder. He played 5 minutes, 13 seconds and didn’t get a shot on goal. He was on the ice for the Backstrom goal and finished the period with a -1.

Read More: Alexander Ovechkin, Boston Bruins, NHL, Tim Thomas
Bruins introduce Jarvis, look toward future 08.04.10 at 6:11 pm ET
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During an impressive offseason in which the Bruins added much needed depth on the ice, the team has now found a new coach to help Claude Julien from up above. Doug Jarvis was introduced Wednesday as the new assistant coach, coming to Boston after lengthy stops in Montreal and Dallas.

The 55-year-old spent the past four years as an associate coach with the Canadiens, having coached alongside Julien during the 2005-06 campaign. Prior to that, he was with the Stars for 14 seasons, and had a fairly impressive playing career, winning four Stanley Cups with the Canadiens (’76, ’77, ’78 and ’79).

The opening for another assistant was created by the departure of Craig Ramsay, who left to become head coach in Atlanta.

When asked about the impact Jarvis will have on the team, Julien explained that the history the two share, as well as the long road he has taken to get here, will be instrumental with such a young team.

“When you talk to Doug Jarvis, he knows a lot about the game,” Julien explained via conference call Wednesday. “He’s played it for such a long time. Also, when you look back at how long he has coached, he’s been through a lot. He knows the different situations, how to deal with those, and you can see that. I’m one of those coaches that will see that first-hand.

“When I had him in Montreal I really enjoyed and really appreciated his loyalty, his dedication. Obviously, he’s one of those guys who will work hard and won’t be counting the hours as far as what needs to be done. People who are passionate are people who do that. Doug’s a very passionate person. He’s got a wealth of Stanley Cup championships as a player and as a coach. And that becomes valuable, especially when you’ve got a fairly young team.”

Jarvis echoed many of the same sentiments, sounding very excited to work in a new city with a young, promising organization.

“Well, certainly, having coached against [the Bruins], not last year but the two previous years, I have certainly seen a team that has great discipline and a lot of structure in it,” he said. “I have seen a team that in it’s development, a team that is on the move, and I think has established itself as a strong contender in pursuit of a Stanley Cup.

“In my playing days, obviously we go back to the late [1970s] there, the rivalry that has always existed between Montreal and Boston. For me, those years were special, in terms of playoffs and working towards the Stanley Cup. We’ve had some very memorable series, as we can all recall, particularly [1979], the seven-game series in the semifinal, and also I believe in [1977] when [Montreal] won the cup. All terrific series, all memorable times against a team and organization that I have a tremendous amount of respect for.”

Jarvis was out of the NHL last season but still followed the game closely. Asked what it will be like coaching from up in the box compared to the bench, he sounded very enthusiastic.

“Yeah, it will be a different perspective, one I am looking forward to when I heard what the role would be,” he added. “From up top it certainly means that keeping an eye on the game and making in-game adjustments that possibly have to be made; giving out information down to the bench. Other things that go along with that role will be pre-scouting the opposition in preparation for the game. I think doing a lot of the normal things coaches do. Whether it’s working with the players one-on-one with the video, those types of things.”

Jarvis added that he missed being close to the game, as well as having the opportunity to teach players the nuances of the game he picked up over the years. The Bruins seem to be an ideal opportunity for him to add to his already impressive resume.

Said Jarvis: “I consider it a real privilege to have the opportunity to join an organization with such a great hockey history and tradition as the Boston Bruins. I’m very much looking forward to becoming a part of the hockey staff in Boston.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Doug Jarvis,
Kovalchuk the best thing that never happened for Bruins 07.19.10 at 5:52 pm ET
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Seventeen years is a long time, but not too long for the Devils and all-galaxy winger Ilya Kovalchuk, apparently. According to reports, Kovalchuk will get in excess of $100 million dollars in a deal that will run longer than both World Wars and the American Civil War combined. The front office in New Jersey must have had a whale of a time trying to project how things will be in 15, 16, and 17 years. Today’s babies will be driving. Today’s children will be parents. Today’s parents will perhaps be grandparents.

And Kovalchuk’s contract will still be on the books.

So, as Devils fans celebrate the retaining of their top offensive threat and take to partying like it’s 2027, it’s quite amusing to think back to a time when fans wanted the Bruins to make a deal last season to acquire the then-Thrasher at any cost. The asking price for Kovalchuk during the season included the first-round pick the Bruins had acquired from the Maple Leafs in the Phil Kessel deal. Blake Wheeler‘s name also popped up in rumors regarding the two teams, though it’s difficult to project which players would have made their way to Atlanta in a deal. During the season it was quite apparent the pick would be at least a top-five-to-top-three pick, and thus the Bruins pulled out of the running due to an unwillingness to move the pick.

Five months and an outrageously lengthy deal later, it appears the Bruins made the right move by making no move at all with the Thrashers. They kept the pick, which ended up being the second overall selection, and got what many believe is a star in center Tyler Seguin. Once signed, Seguin will receive a salary of $900,000 in addition to performance bonuses, which means his cap hit during the life of his entry level deal could max out at around $3.75 million.

Seguin’s contract, should he become the player many expect him to be, will be good money for a potentially elite player. However, given the current cap disaster the Bruins are dealing with, many are wondering how they will even be able to stay under $59.4 million while paying the rookie (who, at age 18, has been alive just one more year than Kovalchuk’s deal will run) the bargain rate of $900,000.

The team has between $500,000 and $600,000 in cap space and, in addition to having to sign Seguin, are just over a week from winger Wheeler’s arbitration date. That situation could be rather costly, as Wheeler earned $2.8 million last season and a source told WEEI.com Monday that the two sides have made “no progress” on a deal to avoid arbitration.

Had the Bruins made a deal involving the Toronto pick for Kovalchuk during the season, not only would they be without the long-term benefits of Seguin, but they would have almost surely lost the winger on the open market. Trying to work out a deal to keep him in the fold would be a stray from what the current front office is used to, as history has shown that general manager Peter Chiarelli’s idea of a lengthy contract is the seven-year, $28.05 million extension the team gave to center Marc Savard in November.

Keeping in mind the team has long-term plans outside of Seguin and Wheeler, getting and keeping Kovalchuk — even if he did receive as long a deal as he got from the Devils and carried a $6 million cap hit — would have made a lot of the Bruins’ other plans a lot tougher. Who knows if they would have been able to give defensemen Dennis Seidenberg and Johnny Boychuk raises before free agency hit or whether they would have waited it out in hopes of making sure they could retain Kovalchuk. Forget about devoting any time to potential extensions for Zdeno Chara and Patrice Bergeron. Maybe Tim Thomas would have been forced to be expendable in a soft deal, thus making the goaltending situation far less stable. There are dozens of other combinations of undesirable cost-cutting maneuvers the Bruins would have been forced into just to make sure they had a chance at keeping the winger.

The Bruins should be applauded for having one of the better offenses for any team in the league. They gave themselves a chance to do big things by getting the pick from Toronto, and in keeping it, they may have avoided financial strife and roster catastrophe.

Read More: Boston Bruins, ilya kovalchuk, Tyler Seguin,
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