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Tyler Seguin and Brad Marchand are just two reasons Bruins are better late than never 01.30.13 at 10:26 am ET
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When the Bruins went on their Stanley Cup run in 2011, they made a habit of scoring big goals late in games.

The last two nights, the Bruins have gone back to their Cup-winning formula, hanging in games close and winning them late.

In Raleigh Monday night, they needed someone to step up and it was Dougie Hamilton feeding David Krejci for the go-ahead marker with under two minutes left in regulation.

On Tuesday night, with the team battling to find its legs for 40 minutes, it was Tuukka Rask who held the fort until the burst of energy came in the form of a third-period awakening. The period started strong and finished strong as Nathan Horton beat Johan Hedberg with 4:05 remaining to send the game into a shootout.

“That’s what it’s all about,” Horton said. “That’s what we talked about, you’re not always going to be at your best, but we pull through. You’re down a goal, you’re down two goals, it doesn’t matter you just work hard and fight back. That’s the kind of team we are and the kind of guys we are on our team. We all know we can come back when we’re down and I think that’s what makes us so good.

“I think we knew all along we can come back, we’ve done it a lot before in the past. Just to reassure that, to know that we can come back at any time, I think again when we roll four lines here, we stay fresh, and you keep battling away, eventually you’re gonna win.”

Not even a sausage-throwing moron from the stands could stand in the way of Tyler Seguin, Brad Marchand and the Bruins walking away with the hard-earned and well-deserved two points. Talk about tasty. Seguin had to score twice in the shootout to put the Bruins on the board and Marchand netted the game-winner in the sixth “inning” as the shootout went three extra rounds.

“It was tough, but we found a way,” Seguin said. “I think the main thing is, we have to keep our shifts short, and we were pretty good at that. We were pretty stingy. We didn’t give a ton. We played a good game. Read the rest of this entry »

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Brad Marchand: Jeff Skinner ‘slew foots all the time’ 01.29.13 at 12:19 pm ET
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Brad Marchand

Patrice Bergeron was uncharacteristically irate at the end of Monday night’s 5-3 win over the Hurricanes when Carolina forward Jeff Skinner appeared to slew-foot the Selke winner behind the Bruins’ net. Bergeron said Tuesday that he isn’t overly concerned with whether the league punishes Skinner, but one of his linemates was a little more fired up about it.

Brad Marchand, who was fined last season for slew footing Penguins defenseman Matt Niskanen, said that Skinner’s behavior was nothing new.

“Skinner slew-foots all the time,” Marchand said Tuesday. “He’s always doing that to guys and I think Bergy just had enough of it. We even spoke about it before the game in the room. The guys were talking about how much he slew foots and you’ve got to watch out for him. You can see it’s very blatant. He kicks his legs out and throws him back.

“I remember I got a fine for that last year. It’s not a good play, it’s frowned upon and if you continue to do that to guys, you’re going to get it. Bergy just had enough, and it was good for Bergy to stand up for himself like that.”

Marchand called the move “a greasy play” and said he regretted doing it himself last season, noting that Skinner should break the habit.

“He’s got to stop doing that,” he said. “If he does it again, I wouldn’t be surprised if a guy got up and took exception. It’s just not a good play.”

[An underrated part of the whole fiasco: Watch Tyler Seguin, who scored an empty-netter after the incident went down, asking, "No goal?" at 0:47]

Bergeron was quite a bit more reserved in addressing the situation, saying that though Skinner had never personally slew-footed him prior to Monday, that was enough to set him off.

“It was the first time he did it [to me], but I thought it was uncalled for,” Bergeron said. “The puck wasn’t even close.”

As for a potential punishment for Skinner, Bergeron said, “I’m not going to get into that.”

“I haven’t looked at the replay,” he said. “I know he did it, but still, at the same time I don’t really care what happens. I don’t think anything’s going to happen out of it.”

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

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Dennis Seidenberg ‘pretty close,’ Brad Marchand expected to play vs. Rangers 01.22.13 at 11:51 am ET
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WILMINGTON — With the 0-2-0 Rangers waiting in New York, the Bruins on Tuesday returned to practice in anticipation of a rematch of the season-opener.

Dennis Seidenberg, who missed Monday’s 2-1 shootout win over the Jets with a lower-body injury, skated by himself prior to the session and participated in the full practice. With Seidenberg back at practice, his pairing with Dougie Hamilton was reunited, as was the Zdeno Chara-Johnny Boychuk duo. The Andrew Ference-Adam McQuaid pairing remained intact in Monday’s game and Tuesday’s practice.

Brad Marchand was the only absence, with Jay Pandolfo filling in for him on Patrice Bergeron‘s line. Lane MacDermid wore a Merlot jersey as the fourth member of Gregory Campbell‘s line.

Claude Julien said after the practice both Seidenberg and Marchand are day-to-day, though he expects Marchand to play Wednesday vs. the Rangers and said that Seidenberg is “pretty close.”

For more Bruins coverage, visit weei.com/bruins.

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Brad Marchand staying in Boston for now, might consider Europe in future 10.11.12 at 2:55 pm ET
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Brad Marchand

On the day that would have seen the NHL begin its regular-season schedule, agent Wade Arnott said Bruins forward Brad Marchand will stay in the Boston area for the time being in hopes that a new collective bargaining agreement can be reched between the NHL and the NHLPA.

Arnott told WEEI.com Thursday that though Marchand is staying in North America for now, he could consider playing in Europe in the future if it appears the league will lose the entire season as it did in 2004-05.

Said Arnott: “If the season becomes in jeopardy then Brad may look more seriously at his European playing options.”

Marchand, 24, was second on the Bruins with 28 goals last season, his second in the NHL.

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Brad Marchand gets four-year extension from Bruins 09.07.12 at 1:01 pm ET
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Brad Marchand will be sticking around for a while. (AP)

The Bruins announced Friday that they have signed forward Brad Marchand to a four-year contract extension with an annual salary cap hit of $4.5 million.

Marchand, 24, is entering the final year of a $5 million two-year deal he signed prior to last season. With Marchand locked up, the Bruins’ list of free agents following next season include restricted free agents Milan Lucic, Tyler Seguin, Jordan Caron and Tuukka Rask. Nathan Horton and Andrew Ference will be unrestricted free agents.

The 2006 third-round pick posted career-highs in goals (28) assists (27) and points (55) last season. He was second to only Seguin in Bruins goals in 2011-12. A surprise 21-goal-scorer as a rookie in 2010-11, Marchand added 11 more goals in the playoffs during the Bruins’ Stanley Cup run.

In addition to his speed, two-way play and penalty kill contributions, Marchand is known for his feisty play and tendency to get under opponents’ skin and has thus been suspended twice by the league. He was given two games in 2010-11 for elbowing R.J. Umberger in the back of the head, but his most notable punishment from the league was a five-game suspension for a low-bridge hit on Sami Salo last January against the Canucks.

Even prior to the Marchand signing, Seguin has been the most intriguing of the Bruins’ upcoming free agents. The B’s have only two $5 million forwards (David Krejci and Patrice Bergeron), but with the likes of Jordan Eberle, Taylor Hall and Jeff Skinner signing long-term deals with annual average values of $6 million or in the neighborhood ($6 for both Eberle and Hall, $5.725 for Skinner), it would appear the 20-year-old Seguin is due for a hefty pay raise.

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Looking back and ahead: Brad Marchand 05.08.12 at 6:54 pm ET
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With the Bruins’ season in the books, WEEI.com will take a look at each player on the roster one-by-one to provide some perspective on what went wrong this season and what the future holds for the 2011 champions.

Brad Marchand scored 28 goals in 2011-12. (AP)

Brad Marchand

Age: 23

2011-12 stats: 76 games played, 28 goals (career-high), 27 assists (career-high), 55 points (career-high), plus-31 (career-high)

Contract status: Signed through 2012-13 ($2.5 million cap hit), restricted free agent following 2012-13 season

Looking back: After being the recipient of the Seventh Player Award in his rookie season, Marchand used his sophomore campaign to show that his impressive 2011-12 performance (21 goals, 20 assists) wasn’t an overachievement.

The 2006 third-round pick played nearly the entire season as Patrice Bergeron‘s left wing, with Tyler Seguin often the right wing. He surpassed his rookie totals in every statistic but shorthanded goals (he had one compared to his five a season ago) and continued to be an asset on both the power play and penalty kill.

Marchand solidified his reputation as a pest this season, but he also continued down the road of being one of the Bruins’ dirtier players. He was fined $2,500 by the league for slew-footing Matt Niskanen on Dec. 15, and given a five-game suspension for his low-bridge hit on Sami Salo on Jan. 7. Marchand has now been suspended twice in his two full NHL seasons and carries with him the “repeat-offender” tag with each sticky situation in which he finds himself.

As was the case with essentially every top-six forward except for Rich Peverley and perhaps Seguin, Marchand was most part very quiet in the Bruins’ seven-game stint in the playoffs against the Capitals. Marchand’s lone game of note came in the form of a two-point performance in Game 5, but his goal and assist in that loss ended up being his only two points of the series.

Looking ahead: Marchand didn’t have big expectations on him as a rookie, and after getting a two-year, $5 million deal entering this past season, he proved to be more than worth the money by nearly putting up a 30-goal season. Now, as he enters the final year of his deal, what is the 23-year-old’s ceiling?

It’s a good question, because the expectation here wasn’t that he would repeat his 21-goal performance from 2010-11 when he finally signed his contract in September after a lengthy offseason of negotiating. So, is the expectation that Marchand can go out each season and put up between 25 and 30 goals? If so, his price tag after this deal expires might cause them to make a choice on some players (Marchand, Seguin, Milan Lucic and Nathan Horton all have their deals expire after next season). Keep in mind that Marchand will be a restricted free agent, so he isn’t a major flight risk unless he pulls a Phil Kessel, which wouldn’t seem likely.

In addition to being an ideal “Bruin” by playing well in all three zones, the pesky winger has been able to exceed offensive expectations in each of his two full seasons in the NHL. He’s remained healthy, and it seems the only thing that can stop him is his tendency to cross the line.

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A closer look at Bruins’ recent Game 7 history 04.24.12 at 9:14 pm ET
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Since the 2007-08 season, the Bruins have played six Game 7s, and until last season, they had lost all of them. In the 2011 playoffs, however, the Bruins won three Game 7s en route to winning the Stanley Cup. Two of those wins were by one goal, one of which was an overtime winner.

The Bruins won their last Game 7. (AP)

Milan Lucic and Brad Marchand lead the Bruins in scoring in those Game 7s with four points each. Lucic has scored three goals and recorded an assist in six Game 7s since 2008 while Marchand, in just three career Game 7s, has two goals and two assists. Both goals and one assist came in Game 7 of the 2011 Stanley Cup Finals against Vancouver, which the Bruins won, 4-0. Nathan Horton has two Game 7 goals, both of which were game-winners. He leads the Bruins in game-winning Game 7 goals since 2008, but is not playing in the playoffs this year because of a concussion.

Tim Thomas played in five of the six Game 7s, and he owns a 3-2 record with a .935 save percentage in Game 7. Thomas engineered the Bruins to two of their three Game 7 wins last season, pitching a shutout in the Eastern Conference finals and the Stanley Cup finals.

Here’s a further breakdown of how the Bruins have fared in Game 7 since 2008:

Read the rest of this entry »

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