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Chirping tweeter: Max Pacioretty calls game ‘longer than [Brad] Marchand’s nose’ 04.23.11 at 9:27 pm ET
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Max Pacioretty may not be able to play, but he can still chirp. Check out what the injured Habs winger tweeted after the second period Saturady (stick-tap to Michael Berger for finding the screen-grab after it was deleted):

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Max Pacioretty,
Bruins Game 5 Live Blog: B’s, Habs head to overtime at 6:29 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia and others at the TD Garden for Game 5 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

<a href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” mce_href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” >WEEI.com Bruins Game 5 Live Blog</a>

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Canadiens, Carey Price
Brad Marchand recalls how Mark Recchi helped him early on as a rookie 04.22.11 at 9:04 pm ET
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Bruins rookie Brad Marchand knows the many ways in which Mark Recchi is a leader. (AP)

MONTREAL — The fact that Mark Recchi is highly respected in the Bruins locker room should come as no surprise to anyone. The 42-year-old has seen everything in his time in the NHL, so when he talks, people listen.

The future Hall-of-Famer did just that after the team’s loss in Game 2 to the Canadiens, telling ESPN recently that he told teammates that they could come back from the 2-0 lead the Habs held after two games. After all, Recchi and the Hurricanes won four in a row to sink the Habs back in 2006 after dropping the first two games of the quarterfinals. The rest, as they say, is history, as the Hurricanes went on to win the Stanley Cup.

Recchi’s words were heard loud and clear by teammates, and they are now halfway to their goal of taking the series after winning Games 3 and 4.

“He said something the other day in the room and everyone kind of perked up a little like, ‘Wow. If Recchi said it, than it’s true,’” linemate Brad Marchand recalled Thursday morning. “It’s great having him here. He’s such a leader. Every time he steps up, he always says the right thing at the right time. It’s great.”

For Marchand, the inspiration from Recchi hasn’t been limited to speeches given to the team. Recchi told the rookie earlier in the season to expect criticism from him.

“One day he was like, ‘I’ll get upset with you. It’s not going to be about you missing a pass, or that you should have given it to me at this [point], but playing your position, little things like that.’ He’s just so good at critiquing you and helping you grow into your game and being in certain positions, stuff like that,” Marchand said. “He was always helping me, telling me to be a certain way or in a certain place. He was really good with that with me throughout the year.”

Marchand’s rookie season was a successful one, as he totaled 21 goals and 20 assists for 41 points. Many of those points came playing on the same line as Recchi and Patrice Bergeron after beginning the season with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton. Though Marchand didn’t always play with Recchi, the help he got from the 42-year-old seemed to come all year after No. 28 expressed an interest in tutoring the youngster.

“He was just like, ‘Listen. I want to help you, and help you out in areas where I think you could maybe do things differently,’ but he never once got upset with me about a pass or anything like that,” Marchand said. “He never got upset with me in general. He would help me out, and any little teaching point that he could help me out with, he really helped me a ton.

“Little things, how he carries himself in the room and off the ice, when to talk to the guys, when to not chirp guys, stuff like that. It’s unbelievable the amount of stuff he knows and he sees throughout the game. He’s like another coach on the ice.”

So, what is a young player thinking when one of the best to play the game begins listing how he could do better? A sensitive player might be disappointed in some, way, shape or form or take feel like they’re doing something wrong. When it comes to Recchi helping Marchand, that isn’t the case.

“You’re very grateful right away, because some guys — a lot of guys — will just sit there and let you make your mistakes,” Marchand said. “He’s that guy that will step up. He likes bringing young guys along, you can tell. The way he talks to everybody, and all the young guys, he helps them out. I was very grateful to have a guy like him teach me things that maybe other guys wouldn’t have. I learned a lot from him this year.”

Recchi’s tutelage of Marchand isn’t the first case in which he’s helped a younger player. Among the youngsters Recchi has helped along the way is Jordan Staal, whom he let live in his guest house back when Staal was a rookie in the 2006-07 season.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Mark Recchi,
Brad Marchand, James Wisniewski still talking as playoffs roll on 04.20.11 at 7:59 pm ET
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MONTREAL — Brad Marchand stood straight-faced in the hallway at Whiteface Lake Placid Olympic Center Wednesday and spoke about what the playoffs mean to him, not even acknowledging how ridiculous he looked.

Brad Marchand shoots, and also shoots his mouth off. (AP)

Marchand, the Bruins’ 22-year-old rookie wise guy, was sporting two different shoes — a white one on the right and a taped-up black one on the left — as he touched on his first taste of playoff hockey at the professional level.

“The amount of emotion and energy of the crowd, it’s so exciting and you get such an adrenaline rush every time you’re on the ice,” Marchand said. “It’s a special time of year.”

Of course, Marchand’s quirks are why he’s become a fan favorite in his rookie campaign in Boston. Off the ice, he isn’t afraid to blast a player or team (he called out Matt Cooke and essentially called the Canadiens divers at different points this season), and on the ice his mouth is just as active as his legs.

Chippy and chirpy, Marchand is the type of player referees keep an eye on, and when going against similar guys, provides great entertainment.

That’s part of what has made this year such a great year (injuries and ugliness aside) for the Bruins/Canadiens rivalry. The additions of Marchand, James Wisniewski and P.K. Subban have provided proof that when it comes to the Bruins and the Habs, the hatred is just as apparent among the players as it is with its fans.

“I know a lot of fans and media like to build it up, but we do [too]. We try to use it to our advantages,” Marchand said of chirping. “It’s a different asset, and in a seven-game series, you can use it to your advantage. Even if the other team takes one penalty, you can capitalize on that one opportunity and it can change the game. Every guy who plays that role — me and Subban and Wisniewski — whoever it is, you definitely want to use it to your advantage.”

Marchand and Wisniewski have been frequent partners in the game of trash-talk. After all, it was Marchand’s hit on Wisniewski after a whistle on Feb. 9 that led to the line-wide scrap that culminated in the world’s worst goalie fight between Tim Thomas and Carey Price. Subban also crushed Marchand in the Dec. 16 game, causing Marchand to miss some time.

Wisniewski was acquired by the Habs back in December in a deal that sent a couple of draft picks to the Islanders. Like Marchand, he is known for using lip as an asset on the ice, so despite their history from the Feb. 9 game, Marchand sees the similarities between the two players as the biggest reason as to why they’ve developed their yapping rapport.

“I don’t know if it’s been like that [just because of Feb. 9]. He’s one of those guys who likes to chirp a bit, and I’m the same way,” Marchand said. “We’ve just kind of been at each other a little bit. It’s just part of both teams’ games to kind of chirp a bit. They play that same style, and we do too.

“When you get two teams like that, there’s always a little bit more after-the-whistle stuff. Maybe at some point it’s kind of taken away from my game, so I might settle down a little.”

The regular season was an exercise in not going over the line with his extracurricular activity on the ice. He would often admit that it could be difficult to know when he was crossing it, and that Claude Julien had a stare reserved for when he did.

Now in the playoffs, Marchand hasn’t seemed to change the way he’s gone about trying to bug the opponent. He can thank the nature of the playoffs, which generally sees referees more lenient, for that.

“I think that kind of helps a little bit, but at the same time, you are always aware of what you’re trying to do out there. You don’t want to be the guy that takes that bad penalty that ends up in a bad goal. You’re always a little extra careful, but at the same time, you don’t want to change the game too much.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, James Wisniewski, P.K. Subban
Bruins still not feeling intended effect following frustrating Game 1 loss to Canadiens 04.15.11 at 12:59 pm ET
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Bruins forward Shawn Thornton and Tim Thomas at practice earlier this week. (AP)

WILMINGTON — After failing to score (or get many quality chances) on Canadiens goaltender Carey Price in a 2-0 loss in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals, there was very little, if any, frustration expressed by the Bruins at Ristuccia Arena Friday.

The B’s hit the ice for practice, while the Habs regulars were given the day off. Still, optimism filled the Bruins’ room. Never mind talk of how ineffective the top line was, or how they couldn’t get second or third chances on Price. The way the players see it, thinking about Game 2 is more important than thinking about Game 1.

“It’s one game, and we’re not going to dwell on it,” Brad Marchand said. “It’s tough when you run into a hot goalie, but that stuff happens. You’ve got to find a way around it. … No one wins the Stanley Cup in the first game of the first series. We’re not frustrated at all. It’s one game, and we’ve got to put it behind us.”

Forward Shawn Thornton, who was given just 5:10 of ice time in the game, shared the same logic.

“It’s fine. We’re good. It’s one game,” Thornton said. “We’re aware that it’s a long series, and we know we can be better, so we’re going to be better tomorrow.”

Both of the Canadiens’ goals were scored by Brian Gionta following Bruins turnovers. Gionta’s first-period tally was set up by Scott Gomez after Tomas Kaberle put too much on a reverse, while Gionta’s third-period goal came following a Milan Lucic turnover in the Bruins’ zone.

“The game’s not perfect. There’s going to be turnovers every now and again,” Thornton said. “You try and limit them as much as possible, but when they happen, you hope that you can get back and bail each other out. That being said, you try and make the right plays at the right time.

“Give them credit, too. They’re a pretty good team. Defensively, they did a really good job of clogging up the neutral zone and clogging up the front of the not and blocking people out. You have to give them credit. They’re a pretty good team over there.”

The B’s will host the Habs for Game 2 at TD Garden on Saturday.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Shawn Thornton,
Brad Marchand: ‘I don’t think anyone expected us to sweep the series’ at 11:16 am ET
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For someone making his Stanley Cup playoff debut, Brad Marchand showed a lot of patience and poise after the Bruins’ 2-0 loss to the Canadiens in Game 1 of the Eastern quarterfinals Thursday night.

“It’s always frustrating when you lose the first game,” Marchand said. “But it happens. I don’t think anyone expected us to sweep the series. They’re coming very hard, they’re ready for they series and they were coming hard [Thursday].”

Marchand had a couple of point-blank chances early on Carey Price, including a backhander that he couldn’t cleanly handle and a first-period breakaway. He also had a semi-breakaway in the second. Still, no dice.

“You try to forget about it right way but it’s in the back of your mind, in case it happens again you want to do it a little differently,” Marchand said of the missed breakaway chance. “But it does definitely frustrate you a bit.

“You feel like you kind of let the team down. You had opportunities like that and you didn’t bury. You can say what if, but at the end of the day there is tomorrow and we have to be ready for that, focus on that and then be ready for the next game. We can’t hang our heads here, and can’t hold onto this. We have to let it go and be ready for the next game.”

Price stopped all 31 shots, including all six by Marchand, who led the Bruins in that category.

“We were frustrated that we didn’t get on the board there but I don’t think it’s going to change our confidence at all. Games go this way, sometimes a goalie makes a lot of big saves, sometimes they all find the back of the net. We just have to regroup in playoffs every game is a different story we have to make sure tomorrow we get more bodies in front and hopefully pucks go in.”

What was to blame for Marchand? Maybe it was simply a matter of speed.

“It was faster, a little more intense,” Marchand said of his first playoff game. “I don’t think the game changed a whole lot. Guys just seemed to keep it a little more simple and tried to stay away from turnovers. I think that was the biggest difference. In that way you can use more speed getting in the zone.

Marchand, who boldly predicted – and correctly so – he’d reach 20 goals and 20 assists in his first full season, isn’t lacking for confidence in himself or the team. So while everyone was suggesting different approaches and line changes for Game 2 Saturday, Marchand believes if the Bruins bring the same energy they showed in the second and third periods, they’ll come out on top.

“We have to play the exact same way we did,” Marchand said. “If we improved one more thing it would be get more bodies in front of the net, in front of Price to take his eyes away, but other than that I think we had a good game.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Montreal Canadiens
Bruins fail to make things difficult for Carey Price in Game 1 loss 04.14.11 at 11:26 pm ET
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On paper, it would appear the Bruins dominated Thursday night’s Game 1 but just happened to run into a hot goaltending performance from Carey Price. After all, they outshot the Canadiens, 31-20, on the night, including 18-6 in the second period.

What the stat sheet doesn’t show, though, is how many of the Bruins’ shots came with no traffic in front, allowing Price to easily get in position and make the save.

Milan Lucic had only shot on goal Thursday. (AP)

“I don’t think we did a very good job of taking away his vision,” said Bruins coach Claude Julien. “He saw a lot of shots tonight and he saw a lot of pucks. We definitely have to get better in that area if we plan on scoring some goals.”

Of course, screening Price and getting traffic to the net is all about being willing to battle in the dirty areas. You have to be able to take a beating and win the fight for position. The Bruins didn’t appear willing to do that Thursday night, even when they had the chance to.

“I think for the most part, we were there and had those opportunities to be in front of the net,” Brad Marchand said. “We were just standing off to the side a bit, looking for tips. The opportunity is there to get in front of his eyes. We just have to do that.”

Julien agreed with his forward that his team simply didn’t work hard enough to get to those areas.

“It’s pretty obvious, I think. There’s no secret here,” Julien said. “If you’re going to score goals on that goaltender, you need to take away his vision, and we didn’t do a good enough job of that. We were all around the net, but we weren’t in front.”

Those problems carried over to the power play, too. The Bruins struggled to get set up on the man advantage early in the game, but they did a better job of possessing the puck and creating some chances as the game went on.

But as was the case at even strength, Price was able to track pretty much every shot. In several instances, the Bruins delayed shooting the puck in the hopes that someone would get to the net for a screen, deflection or rebound, but it rarely came. When they did pull the trigger, Price was able to easily cover or his defensemen were able to easily clear away the rebound.

“Again, same old, same old,” Julien said. “We had some great shots, but we didn’t do a very good job in front of the net with the screens, with the loose pucks, and weren’t able to capitalize.”

The Bruins were happy with a lot of other aspects of their game Thursday night — Marchand even said they “have to play the exact same way” in Saturday’s Game 2 — but they know they’ll need to make things tougher for Price and not rely on him making mistakes if they’re going to win the series.

“He’s a good goalie, yes, but we’ve got to make sure we have traffic in front of him,” Patrice Bergeron said. “He’s going to make those stops if he sees it, and that’s all.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Carey Price, Patrice Bergeron
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