Big Bad Blog AT&T
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Bruins’
Barry Pederson on D&C: Bruins ‘forwards last night were awful with puck management’ 06.20.13 at 11:19 am ET
By   |  Comments Off on Barry Pederson on D&C: Bruins ‘forwards last night were awful with puck management’

NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined the Dennis & Callahan show Thursday morning to talk about the Bruins’ loss in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals.

The Blackhawks offense broke out with a six-goal performance in the game, which was more than the Bruins had allowed in their last four games combined. Pederson said that the Bruins defense struggled because the team’s forwards consistently turned the puck over in the neutral zone.

‘€œYour defense creates your offense and it’€™s your forwards that create your team defense,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œWell the forwards last night were awful with puck management. Turnovers, of course that first goal with [Tyler] Seguin turning it over, but throughout the game Brad Marchand, [Milan] Lucic, they all struggled in areas where they had been very responsible at throughout the playoffs, not allowing outnumbered opportunities. You could also see that as that happened, the turnovers, the transition, Chicago’€™s speed started to jump in, they got some confidence, you saw [Duncan] Keith jumping in, [Brent] Seabrook, [Michal] Rozsival from the backside.’€

Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg were a combined minus-5 on the night, in part due to their inability to keep Chicago forwards away from the front of the net. However, Pederson noted that the B’s forwards did not give them much help in the defensive zone like they had throughout the rest of the playoffs.

‘€œIf you can allow Chara and Seidenberg that even-up opportunity with two-on-two, there is no way [Tuukka Rask is not able to see shots through screens],’€ Pederson said. ‘€œThey were coming at them with three-on-twos and four-on-twos. When you’€™re Chara and Seidenberg, when you see that, normally you are taking away their space by attacking defensively at them. Now you see you have an outnumbered opportunity you’€™ve got to back in. As soon as you back in you give up the blue line, and when you give up the blue line now Chicago can go east-west and not just north-south, which causes problems. As you back off and you have speed, now that allows Chicago to get in front of Tuukka with that front-net presence. You can’€™t get inside position, you can’€™t box out because they’€™re coming at you in waves.

‘€œBut again, that all started with poor puck management in the neutral zone, getting caught defensively, you saw a couple of times when you saw the Bruins defense do what they were supposed to do which was pinch, but there were no forwards behind them backing them up like there was earlier on in the playoffs.’€

However, Pederson pointed out that the silver lining for the Bruins in Game 4 was that they seemed to have figured out Corey Crawford. All five goals went to the glove side, which reminded Pederson of the goalie the Bruins beat last time they were in the Stanley Cup finals.

‘€œTo me, as that game wore on last night, he looked exactly like Roberto Luongo having trouble with that glove,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œYou watch him when he goes into that stance and he is anticipating a shot, instead of having his glove to his side where it should be, he has it up by his head. When he goes down, his glove has to go from by his ear all the way down to by his pads, and right in that area is where they were scoring.

‘€œHe didn’€™t look comfortable. It was almost like he was sitting there ‘€” and I can remember my baseball days playing second base saying, ‘€˜Don’€™t hit the ball to me.’€™ He didn’€™t want that puck on him. It must have been overtime when he was sitting ‘€” that one dump in by [David] Krejci on a snap shot from the blue line gave him all kinds of trouble.’€

To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page. For more Bruins news, visit the team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: 2013 Stanley Cup finals, Barry Pederson, Bruins,
Doc Emrick on M&M: Tuukka Rask gives Bruins ‘check mark’ over Blackhawks 06.12.13 at 12:34 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

NBC Sports play-by-play caller Mike “Doc” Emrick joined Mut & Merloni on Wednesday morning to break down the Stanley Cup finals between the Bruins and Blackhawks.

Emrick said he expects the series to be almost dead even, and he did not offer a prediction for who would raise the Stanley Cup in the end. However, he drew a comparison between this series and the 1995 finals between the Devils and Red Wings.

‘€œThe edge is very difficult to call,’€ Emrick said. ‘€œI know there have been various surveys done and I think one very extensive one in Canada came out 50 percent to 49.2 percent, and at that point I didn’€™t even ask who had the 50 percent because it becomes ‘€” it is pretty much the way that everyone here is thinking. It is just too tough to call.

‘€œI remember a similar thing that happened when we had a 48-game season in 1995 and we went into the final with a favorite team and a non-favorite one because the New Jersey Devils were not a good scoring team. They had a good goaltender and they played good defense. And the Red Wings were lights out. I mean, they were the biggest offensive juggernaut going and they banged their way through Chicago to get to the final and then New Jersey shut them down in four straight games with a defensive scheme.’€

Emrick continued that comparison between the current series and the 1995 finals while discussing Zdeno Chara‘€™s impact on Tuukka Rask‘€™s play. Emrick compared Chara’€™s dominance to that of hall-of-fame defenseman Scott Stevens.

‘€œI think if you were to ask that question to Marty Brodeur, he would say that Scott Stevens‘€™ years were some of his best, because when you have somebody out there that is a presence that takes care of business as well as Scott did and as well as Zdeno Chara does and covers even more distance than Scott would ever hope to just because of his raw size.’€ Emrick said. ‘€œI think you’€™re making a very good comparison there and I think you’€™re also giving appropriate credit to the defense in front of [Rask].’€

While he praised Chara for his defense, Emrick was sure to give credit to Rask, saying that he gave the Bruins an advantage between the pipes over Corey Crawford.

‘€œIf you want to put a check mark in one particular category that I think solidly goes to Boston, it is goaltending,’€ Emrick said. ‘€œAnd again, we have the leading goals-against average is one guy and the other is second. And the leading save percentage is the other guy and the one guy is second. So you can waffle back and forth. It seems to me the way that Rask has been playing, that is a check mark to the Bruins.

‘€œAs [NBC Sports color commentator] Eddie Olczyk always says, ‘€˜Without goaltending you have got no shot.’€™ And they’€™ve sure got goaltending.’€

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Bruins, Doc Emrick, Tuukka Rask, Zdeno Chara
David Krejci: ‘We might have the best team in the world’ 06.07.13 at 11:58 pm ET
By   |  18 Comments

Following the Bruins’ sweep against the Penguins, B’s forward David Krejci once again emphasized the importance of his team’s togetherness.

“We don’t have the superstars on this team. We don’t have the best player in the world. But we might have the best team in the world,” said Krejci. “We play as a team.”

This isn’t the first time we’ve heard Krejci talk about the “best players in the world.” After a 3-0 Game 1 victory, Krejci compared the Penguins to the Bruins.

‘€œThose guys, I think they’€™re the best players in the world at this moment. There’€™s no one like those guys. On the other hand, we don’€™t have guys like that. We have a team. We all play as a team,’€ Krejci said at the time.

The Bruins forward is the team leader in points, goals, and assists this postseason, but has stressed a team-first mentality throughout.

“In the playoffs you need everyone to step up at one point,” answered Krejci. “Tuukka [Rask] has been doing it, defensemen have been doing it, and forwards have been doing it. If you want to go far in the playoffs you need more than just one or two lines to score goals.”

Fifteen different Bruins players have scored goals so far this playoffs.

Read More: Bruins, David Krejci, Sidney Crosby, Tuukka Rask
What to make of these Bruins as they head into homestretch 04.08.13 at 1:26 am ET
By   |  6 Comments

How good are the Bruins? Depends on your mentality.

The optimist loves their chances. He remembers that the team is one of just four with fewer than 10 regulation losses. The pessimist, on the other hand, is worried. He notices that five of those losses have come in their last 11 games. The realist, meanwhile, is trying to figure out just who these Bruins really are.

Good luck, realist.

Regardless of your level of hope, there is no doubt that Bruins are scuffling right now. The team that looked dead in Philadelphia, asleep for 50 minutes in Buffalo, gave up 87 shots in two home games and then embarrassed itself when it couldn’t even muster a shot in their six-on-four power play late in Montreal is clearly not the same group that cruised to a 19-4-3 record to start the year.

There are some obvious differences. These Bruins have had serious personnel changes since the start of the year. Not only have they lost the contributions from two key centermen (Chris Kelly and now Patrice Bergeron), but their loss has tested their depth at the position. It has forced Claude Julien to juggle his lines and shift both Tyler Seguin and Rich Peverley from the wing, weakening two of his four lines. They’ve also been forced to test their depth on the blue line as Matt Bartkowski and Aaron Johnson have spelled the injured Adam McQuaid and Johnny Boychuck.

Fortunately for the B’s, I think the optimists win this one. Boychuck is already back. Kelly is close to returning. McQuaid has now skated with the team. Only Bergeron remains as a great mystery for the playoffs, and without him I think we all become horribly pessimistic. He is that important to their postseason chances. Without his presence, as Paul Pierce said about Kevin Garnett‘s effect on the Celtics, ‘€œThey aren’t going anywhere.’€

During this downturn, however, we’ve seen a run of third-period losses. A team once built upon late-game surges has seen its power turned off in key spots. I see two possible explanations: Either the Bruins are getting tired in the third periods, or their goalie keeps losing concentration.

I think the B’s are just tired, and so on this question I’ll remain optimistic as well. Much has been made of the condensed schedule and the toll it is taking on especially physical teams. Julien’s blueprint has always been to beat you up for 40 minutes then take advantage of your exhaustion late. If the schedule has prevented them from playing as physically as they’d like, I’ll assume that they are smartly keeping something in reserve for the playoffs.

But that doesn’t mean there aren’t causes for major concern.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Bruins, Claude Julien, Tyler Seguin,
Ryan Spooner and Jared Knight eyeing spot in Boston 06.30.12 at 11:50 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Ryan Spooner and Jared Knight eyeing spot in Boston

WILMINGTON – Dougie Hamilton has made headlines as the player most likely to make it to Boston for the 2012-13 season out of the development camp this week. While he has the best shot at making the NHL roster, there are a few others that are probably not as far off as one would think.

Ryan Spooner and Jared Knight, who were both selected in the second round of the 2010 draft (Knight was taken 32nd overall, Spooner was taken 45th overall), are among the next tier of prospects who have a shot grabbing the 12th forward spot in Boston.

While the Bruins currently have 11 healthy forwards on the roster (12 if Nathan Horton can return in time for the start of the next season), there is a chance that Spooner or Knight impresses the coaching staff enough to earn the final spot on the roster. However, they would have to beat out any veteran free agents that the team signs along with any AHL player in line to make the jump to the next level, such as newly acquired Chris Bourque, or Carter Camper.

“Yeah, it’s going to be hard for them,’€ said Peter Chiarelli on Friday. “What we told them going into this camp is that you’re going to have an opportunity to make the team. There’s obviously some that are more likely than others to have that opportunity, but what we’ve done in the past and what we will do in the future is that, if they knock our socks off, we will find room for them.”

The tough task ahead to make the roster does not deter Knight, who said he is shooting to make the NHL club.

‘€œI’€™m not going to go into camp thinking I’€™m just going to get sent down to Providence,’€ Knight said. ‘€œI think if I put in a lot of work these next seven or eight weeks I can give myself a chance. You never know with injuries or trades or things like that ‘€¦ That is out of my control though. I’€™m just coming to camp ready to play.’€

Spooner also said that he would try his best to make the NHL team, but that right now he is just focused on improving his attention to detail.

‘€œHopefully one day I can make it to the National Hockey League,’€ Spooner said. ‘€œRight now I am just focusing on doing all the little things that are going to get me there.

‘€œI think skill-wise I could keep up. But I think the little things, like I said, my strength, how to adjust to that type of game, [I need to improve on].’€ Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Bruins, Bruins Development Camp, Jared Knight, Ryan Spooner
Bruins take winger Colton Hargrove with seventh-round pick 06.23.12 at 1:30 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Bruins take winger Colton Hargrove with seventh-round pick

The Bruins used their final pick of the NHL draft to select winger Colton Hargrove in the seventh round (205th overall).

Hargrove spent last season with the Fargo Force of the United States Hockey League, where he recorded 16 goals, 22 assists and 140 penalty minutes in 54 games. The Rockwall, Texas, native will be turning 20 on Monday, and will be playing hockey at Western Michigan University next year. Hargrove stands at 6-foot-2, 212 pounds.

The last player the Bruins took from the Fargo Force was goaltender Zane Gothberg, whom they selected in the sixth round in 2010.

Read More: 2012 NHL Draft, Bruins, Colton Hargrove,
Bruins select defenseman Matthew Benning with sixth round pick at 12:32 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Bruins select defenseman Matthew Benning with sixth round pick

The Bruins selected defenseman Matthew Benning in the sixth round (175th overall) of the 2012 NHL draft on Saturday.

Benning, who played with the Spruce Grove Saints of the Alberta Junior Hockey League last season, scored four goals and 14 assists and recorded 87 penalty minutes in 44 games played. Benning, who turned 18 years old in May, is 6-feet, 218 pounds, and was ranked the No. 176 North American skater by NHL Central Scouting.

He comes from good hockey roots, as his father, Brian Benning, was drafted 26th overall by the Blues in 1984 and played with five different teams in his NHL career. His uncle, Jim Benning, was drafted sixth overall by the Maple Leafs, and spent nine seasons with the Leafs and the Canucks.

Read More: 2012 NHL Draft, Bruins, Matthew Benning,

Latest from Bleacher Report

Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines