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Unable to win in a uniform, Neely hopes to win Stanley Cup as an executive 05.31.11 at 9:06 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — When it comes to the Bruins playing the Canucks in the Stanley Cup finals, there is a buzz throughout the entire organization. From players, to coaches, right on up to management, the excitement for the B’s to reach the highest level is clear.

One guy to whom this series may be even more special is team president and former player Cam Neely, who hails from British Columbia and began his career with the Canucks before being traded to the Bruins in 1986.

“I got to Maple Ridge in 1976 and became a huge Canuck fan,” Neely recalled. “… Unfortunately it  didn’t  work  out  well  for  me here, and things worked well in Boston.

“I certainly kept tabs on what happened to the Canucks over the years, of course except when they played us. But  it’s  home,  Boston  is  home as well. It’s fun to see what the Canucks have been able to accomplish, especially this year. They’ve got a great team. It’s going to be a pretty interesting series.”

Though Neely could not hoist the Cup in his playing days, he hopes to do so as an executive, something he spoke to Tuesday.

“It would  be  by  far  the next best thing, there’s no question,” Neely said. “Absolutely no question. I mean, when you’re a player, your goal is  to  make  the  NHL. Once you get into the league, you want to win the Stanley Cup. Unfortunately, I didn’t  have a chance to do it in a uniform, but hopefully can do it in a suit.”

Neely admitted that despite years in press box with the B’s, he still hasn’t totally settled into watching a game without the intensity that comes with being on the ice, saying it’s “much harder than playing,” and that he is “still getting used to it.”

While winning the Cup as a player would have been the ultimate prize for Neely, at least he can watch his team now knowing he’s watching a good product.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Cam Neely, Stanley Cup Finals,
David Krejci: This is why ‘you work all season for home ice’ 05.26.11 at 12:23 am ET
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TAMPA — After becoming the first Bruins player since Cam Neely to record a playoff hat trick, David Krejci said the disappointed Bruins can still take solace in the fact they have one game on home ice to win to get to the Stanley Cup finals.

“It’s tough, frustrating obviously, but that’s why you work all season to get home ice advantage, and now we have it,” Krejci said. “Game 7 in our building and in front of our fans, it’s going to be exciting.”

Krejci almost brought the Bruins back single-handedly from a 5-3 deficit late as he scored his third goal with 6:32 remaining in the third. His third goal not only matched Martin St. Louis with his NHL-leading 10th playoff goal, it gave him the first Boston playoff hat trick since Neely against the Canadiens on April 25, 1991. Krejci had several chances in the closing moments as the Bruins swarmed Dwayne Roloson but could not find the equalizer.

“It’s going to be a tough night, maybe, but once you wake up [Thursday], we have to forget about it,” Krejci said. “I think we’ve done a pretty good job at it after a win or loss. We regroup no matter what. We came back strong the next game so hopefully, we can do it again.

“We’re still one win away the Stanley Cup finals so, regroup [Thursday] and get ready for Friday,” Krejci said.

While scoring their first road power play goal in 26 chances, the Bruins were victimized by Lightning power play goals on their first three chances.

“Maybe a couple of calls were questionable but it doesn’t really matter right now,” Krejci said. “What’s done is done. We have to look at their power play, make some adjustments and be better next game.”

The Bruins will be trying to repeat the result of Game 7 in the first round against the Canadiens, when they beat Montreal, 3-2, in overtime on home ice to advance to the second round.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Cam Neely, David Krejci
Think the Bruins are looking forward to a rematch with the Flyers? You bet 04.28.11 at 1:58 am ET
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Don’t be fooled by Cam Neely.

The Bruins finally get their chance at revenge on the Flyers – and they want it badly.

“This probably gives you guys more to write about I’€™m sure,” Neely said with a grin following Boston’s 4-3 overtime over the Candiens in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals Wednesday. “We don’€™t have the same team as we did last year, and Philly doesn’€™t have the exact same team either. That’€™s certainly going to be mentioned a lot and talked a lot about, but first and foremost we’ve got to concern ourselves [with] how we play in that first game.”

At least Neely would recognize their next round opponent. The same could not be said for Tim Thomas.

“I told you, I have at least until midnight before I have to think about that,” Thomas said when asked repeatedly about the second-round series that opens Saturday afternoon at Wells Fargo Center.

Yes, the teams have tweaked their rosters, but they still have two of the most identifiable logos on the crests of their sweaters. Claude Julien wanted to focus on the fact that his team just beat another franchise with a pretty famous logo on its sweater – and did so in historic fashion.

“I mean, it is what it is and the fact is we got ourselves down two nothing in this series,” Julien said of overcoming the 0-2 hole against Montreal. “I think it was important for ourselves to get back into this series. There was a lot at stake in this series as well. We understand the rivalry between Montreal and Boston and it’€™s been there many times. And we also know the statistics of the winning percentages of both teams when they play each other.”

Then came Julien’s acknowledgment of the next opponent.

“It was a big deal for us and we really focused on that and there is no doubt that tonight, we knew winning this game would give us another opportunity to play Philly. If anything I think it’€™s going to make it interesting. I think a lot of people are going to be watching this to see how it develops, and we’€™re excited to have that opportunity.”

First round hero Nathan Horton wasn’t even on the Bruins team that couldn’t close out last year against the Flyers, but he senses the pain and the desire for redemption.

“Well, this is huge, and definitely with what happened last year, we can put that in the past now,” Horton said. “It’€™s a new year. We’€™ve gone through it. Anything can happen in the playoffs. You’€™re up three-nothing, or down two-nothing, and things can turn. You’€™ve just got to work through it, and be prepared to always continue to work until you get that fourth win, because like everyone says, it’€™s the hardest one to get.”

Now, if they can just repeat it three more times.

Read More: 2010 Stanley Cup Playoffs, 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Cam Neely
Milan Lucic once again celebrates a milestone in style 03.22.11 at 11:54 pm ET
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What’s a Milan Lucic milestone without interesting postgame attire?

After recording his 30th goal of the season Tuesday night, Lucic entered the dressing room in an old, faded (and old) Bruins windbreaker from what appeared to be the early 1990s. Lucic conducted his entire session with reporters without making mention of it, but explained the fashion choice afterward.

Andrew Ference found it, and he wanted to kind of pass it on between the guys,” Lucic said, “so I guess I’m the model for it.”

“It’s Cam [Neely]’s era,” Lucic said of the style with a laugh. “His team track suits.”

Devotees will remember that Lucic was sporting a fedora following his Nov. 18 hat trick. He said after that game that each player to pick up a hat trick would wear the fedora following the game. Since then, both Patrice Bergeron and Zdeno Chara have celebrated hat tricks — sans headwear.

“I guess I’m the model of the team,” Lucic said of the fact that he starts trends that his teammates may or, more commonly, may not follow. “I have to fashion off all the new stuff.”

The jacket was entertaining, but it certainly wasn’t “new stuff.” It was old.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Cam Neely, Milan Lucic,
Former Bruins coach Pat Burns dies, Cam Neely issues statement 11.19.10 at 8:17 pm ET
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The hockey world was shaken as NHL coaching legend Pat Burns died on Friday. Burns, 58, had battled colon cancer, liver cancer, and lung cancer in the later stages of his life.

Burns coached the Bruins from 1997-2000, leading them for 254 games. He also coached in Montreal, Toronto, and New Jersey over his 20 year career, leading the Devils to a Stanley Cup victory in 2003 over the Mighty Ducks in a thrilling seven game series.

In total, Burns had a coaching record of 501-353-151-14 record in 1,019 NHL games. Bruins president Cam Neely issued the following statement on Friday evening:

“On behalf of the Jacobs family and the entire Boston Bruins family, I would like to express our deep sorrow on the passing of Pat Burns. Pat was a great coach and more importantly a wonderful man. The Bruins are honored to have him as a part of our history. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Burns family.”

Read More: Cam Neely, Pat Burns,
Cam Neely trade helped more than the player 10.27.10 at 9:27 pm ET
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Cam Neely was born in British Columbia and didn’t become a dual citizen until a couple of years ago, yet it’s unquestioned that his impact on hockey in America has been far-reaching. As a result, it was no surprise to see him among the recipients of the Lester Patrick Award for his contributions to hockey in the United States.

It took the Bruins’ 1986 deal with Vancouver to get Neely to the states, and the deal was highly beneficial to a number of people for a number of reasons. The trade rescued a 20-year-old Neely from fourth-line minutes, but the man who made the trade, which sent Barry Pederson, to the Canucks for Neely and a first-round pick, notes that Neely may have helped him as much as he helped Neely.

‘€œIf I hadn’€™t made the trade, I would’€™ve been probably an advisor to the owner a lot earlier,’€ Harry Sinden said with a laugh prior to Wednesday’s award ceremony.

It was in Boston where he established himself as a one-of-a-kind player, as Sinden noted that he has never seen a 50-goal scorer (something Neely was three times in his career, once accomplishing it in 49 games) play with the edge that Neely did, though he pointed to Alexander Ovechkin as the closest thing to it. Neely said Wednesday that the trade to Boston and embracing the style of hockey he knew he could make made all the difference in making the jump from a 14-goal-scorer (his total in his final year in Vancouver) to the player he became.

“Here’s another opportunity to show another organization maybe what I didn’t get the opportunity to show Vancouver,” Neely recalled thinking at the time of the deal. “For me, it was all about playing physical. I knew how I played in junior hockey, and I was playing physical and I knew that I could score goals, but the physical part obviously is a lot easier than scoring goals. I just said to myself, ‘I’m going to go there, and when I have an opportunity to take the body, I’m going to take the body.’ I knew for the most part that I could handle myself if somebody didn’t like that, so I was prepared for what came with me playing physical.”

Jack Parker, another Lester Patrick recipient on Wednesday, spoke highly of the player he saw arrive, noting that Neely’s celebrity in Boston has helped him compile talent in recent years. The three-time NCAA championship-winning Boston University coach felt that having a player like Neely to look up to served in inspiring kids throughout New England to get into hockey. Without Neely, Parker said, the team simply wouldn’t have as many local prospects to choose from.

Now president of the Bruins and someone who inspires the current squad, the impact that Neely has made on an organization, a town, a country, and a sport, continues to be felt. But what if the trade never happened? Aside from Sinden’s quip, Boston sports and hockey in America would be far different.

“I have thought about that, and the only conclusion that I could come up with is that I probably wouldn’t have been able to accomplish what I did,” Neely said. “What I would have been able to accomplish, I can’t really say. It’s impossible to say, but maybe if I went to another team, something similar would have happened, but obviously coming here was the best thing at the best time for me.”

Read More: Cam Neely,
Cam Neely on D&H: B’s will go slow with Tyler Seguin 10.21.10 at 1:01 pm ET
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Bruins President Cam Neely joined the Dale & Holley show to talk about the B’s as they return to the Garden ice Thursday night for their home opener. Neely talked about the team’s plans for rookie Tyler Seguin, why signing Zdeno Chara to a seven-year contract was the right move and his thoughts on the goaltending situation.

(To hear the whole interview, visit the Dale & Holley audio on demand page).

Neely said the Bruins were in an enviable position with Seguin, the second pick in the draft, because they have so much depth. “You have to be careful with expectations for an 18-year-old regardless of where he goes in the draft,” Neely said. “Some can adapt quicker than others, some have the size and strength of an NHL player, some don’t. With Tyler, we’re taking it very slow, we’re taking it very cautious with him.

“We’re certainly in a different position than most second overall picks would be in, they generally are on a team that maybe isn’t as deep as what we currently have. We’re able to have in ease him into this league and get comfortable, learn a little bit more on the defensive side. We expect him to get better and better as time goes on.”

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Read More: Cam Neely, Tim Thomas, Tyler Seguin, Zdeno Cara
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