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Bruins won’t re-sign Gregory Campbell, Daniel Paille 04.13.15 at 12:23 pm ET
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Much of the conversation of Monday’€™s breakup day at TD Garden revolved around the future of the Bruins. Some current players won’€™t be part of it.

The B’€™s have six unrestricted free agents in Gregory Campbell, Daniel Paille, Carl Soderberg, Adam McQuaid, Matt Bartkowski and Niklas Svedberg. The team could lose all of them and survive.

Paille and Campbell have already been notified that they won’t be back. Bartkowski has not yet been told whether he’€™ll be offered a contract. Soderberg will not return to Sweden. He’d like to stay with the Bruins, but he would get more money and opportunity elsewhere.

The free agents are just part of the equation. Especially if Peter Chiarelli is to be relieved of his duties, trades could be a big part of this offseason. The biggest name to watch in that regard is that of Milan Lucic. The 26-year-old left wing is entering the final year of his three-year, $18 million contract, and though he wants to stay, that might not be the right business move for the Bruins.

“I like to think that I’€™m worth it,” Lucic said of his contract. “I showed in the past that I earned the deal that I’€™m currently on with my play on the ice. That’€™s one of the things that I have to do in order to [get another big contract] moving forward. I have to prove that I’€™m still worth that, and you have to prove that by your play on the ice.

“I still believe I can bring a lot to the table as a player. I plan on doing that moving forward.”

Lucic’€™s modified no-trade clause allows him to submit a list of 15 teams to which he would accept a trade. He is coming off an 18-goal season, marking the second time in the last three seasons that he has averaged less than 0.25 goals per game. Lucic scored at a 0.37 goals per game rate in his 30-goal 2010-11 campaign.

Read More: Carl Soderberg, Milan Lucic,
5 things we learned as Bruins score 3 straight to beat Red Wings 04.02.15 at 10:15 pm ET
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Zach Trotman picked a perfect time for his first NHL goal, as he gathered the puck after his point shot was blocked and sent it past Petr Mrazek to cap the Bruins’ come-from-behind 3-2 victory over the Red Wings. The Bruins pulled out the victory by scoring three unanswered goals in the third period after the Red Wings built a 2-0 lead.

With the win, the Bruins pulled even with the Red Wings with 93 points for the third playoff spot in the Atlantic Division, though Detroit has five games remaining to Boston’€™s four. The teams are even in regulation and overtime wins (the first tiebreaker), but the Bruins now own the second tiebreaker after winning the season series against the Red Wings.

The Senators beat the Lightning in overtime later in the evening, keeping the Senators within three points of the B’s and Wings.

As the Red Wings dominated the first two periods, Tuukka Rask kept the game within reach for the B’€™s. His efforts were eventually rewarded when, after Detroit made it 2-0 with a Stephen Weiss power-play goal, Carl Soderberg and Loui Eriksson scored 31 seconds apart. Reilly Smith earned the primary assist on both goals.

Trotman made it 3-2 with 3:08 remaining, and a too-many-men penalty for Detroit with 47.2 while trying to play 6-on-5 sealed Boston’€™s fourth straight win.

Brett Connolly, who made his Bruins debut, assisted both Trotman’s game-winner and Carl Soderberg’s power-play goal in the third for a two-point night.

Here are four more things we learned Thursday:

BERGERON LEAVES, RETURNS

Patrice Bergeron played only one shift in the second period, and he appeared to get injured on it following a faceoff against Luke Glendening. During a battle for the puck, Justin Abdelkader’€™s stick appeared to get Bergeron somewhere in the face.

Bergeron would return to the game for the start of the third period wearing a full shield. He tripped Glendening 58 seconds into the period, setting a new career high in penalty minutes with 44 on the season.

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Read More: Carl Soderberg, Reilly Smith, Zach Trotman,
Claude Julien says ‘lack of finish is probably the biggest concern right now’ 03.06.15 at 8:50 am ET
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It’s been the one thing that has haunted these Bruins all season.

They can’t find a way to finish scoring opportunities in and around the net and wind up regretting it at the end of the game. Such was the case again Thursday night in a 4-3 shootout loss to the Calgary Flames. There were several chances for the Bruins to put some distance between themselves and Calgary in the early and middle parts of the game and they simply couldn’t find the finishing touch.

There was Daniel Paille with a wrister on Flames goalie Karri Ramo midway through the first period. There was a slap shot from Dougie Hamilton that was deflected away by a stick at the last moment. But there was no better example of Boston’s inability to find the scoring touch than when Loui Eriksson, on a 3-on-1 rush, had the puck on his stick and fired wide of an empty net midway through the third period.

Carl Soderberg, without a goal since Jan. 17 against Columbus, has now gone 17 games without a goal. He had two chances in the opening period and couldn’t find the back of the net.

“Again, the challenge of our lack of finish is probably the biggest concern right now,” coach Claude Julien said. “So I think we had the better of the game, five-on-five. There’€™s no doubt we played a lot more in their end then they did in ours.

“It’€™s a little bit of maybe confidence, and you squeeze your stick you’€™re trying so hard. There’€™s a lot of guys, use Carl Soderberg as an example. He’€™s really struggled the last little while scoring goals, and guys are putting pressure on themselves. There’€™s games where you like your team’€™s game, but your finish is what ends up killing you at the end.”

Julien realizes that the Bruins had chances leading 1-0 and 2-1 to really do damage and failed to seize on the opportunity because they simply couldn’t finish.
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Read More: Boston Bruins, Calgary Flames, Carl Soderberg, Claude Julien
Five things we learned as Tuukka Rask, Dougie Hamilton lead Bruins past Stars 01.20.15 at 11:10 pm ET
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Dougie Hamilton

Dougie Hamilton

The Bruins playing the Stars will always bring up Tyler Seguin storylines, but on Tuesday it was the product of the Phil Kessel trade that the Bruins kept who made the difference.

Dougie Hamilton had a two-point night, including his career-high eighth goal of the season in the third period, to give the B’€™s a 3-1 victory over the Stars in Dallas (box).

The victory was the Bruins’€™ sixth in their last seven games, giving them points in 11 of the last 12.

It was also the second and final game of Brad Marchand‘s suspension. Marchand will be eligible to return Wednesday against the Avalanche, which is the Bruins’ final game before the All-Star break.

Here are four more things we learned Thursday:

BRUINS TRADE CHANCES AND PENALTIES

Players went three places Tuesday: up the ice for a scoring chance, down the ice to defend one and then to the penalty box.

From the opening shift of the game, when Jamie Benn was sprung on a breakaway and then tripped by Adam McQuaid, the Bruins and Stars swapped both scoring chances and penalties. It’s a frantic style the Bruins would rather not play, but strong penalty killing allowed them to survive it.

The B’€™s took six penalties on the night and killed off each of them, while Hamilton’€™s power-play goal came on Dallas’€™ fourth penalty of the night.

Standing tall for the Bruins throughout it all was Tuukka Rask, who made timely saves and got some help from the post.

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Read More: Carl Soderberg, Dou, Dougie Hamilton,
Columbus coach Todd Richards: Carl Soderberg hit on Matt Calvert ‘a shot right to his head’ 01.17.15 at 10:38 pm ET
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Another Bruin may be hearing from the NHL‘s Department of Player Safety. In the second period of Saturday night’s game against Columbus, Carl Soderberg caught Matt Calvert with a shoulder to the head as he tried to throw a hit, something Blue Jackets coach Todd Richards was quick to point out after the game.

“I thought the hit [Calvert] took in the second period was a shot right to his head,” Richards said.

Soderberg said he didn’t remember the play when asked about it after the game. Calvert was not made available to the media because he has been battling an illness.

Soderberg has no previous history with supplemental discipline.

Read More: Carl Soderberg,
5 things we learned as Bruins ride fast start to victory over Red Wings 12.29.14 at 9:41 pm ET
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Carl Soderberg

Carl Soderberg

The Bruins recovered nicely from Saturday’€™s embarrassing loss to the Blue Jackets, as they took a 5-2 victory over the Red Wings Monday at TD Garden to give them victories in three of their last four games.

Boston made do with a relatively scarce roster, as both Milan Lucic and Patrice Bergeron missed the game with undisclosed injuries and Matt Fraser was lost to the Oilers earlier in the day on waivers. Matt Lindblad, recalled after Fraser was claimed by Edmonton, dressed in his second NHL game of the season.

Though Boston relented after a strong push to open the game, the B’€™s gained much-needed separation with a third-period Seth Griffith goal after Detroit had cut their lead to one late in the second period. Chris Kelly scored an empty netter to seal the victory.

The win showed, at the very least, that the Bruins do have another gear. Though they didn’€™t sustain it throughout the night, they found it long enough to take two points from a divisional opponent.

Here are four more things we learned:

BRUINS OWN THE FIRST

The Bruins took the ice Monday clearly aware that they were without two of their best forwards. Their push to make up for the absences of Lucic and Bergeron translated into puck possession dominance and overwhelming victories in puck battles throughout the opening period.

Most importantly, the B’s scored three goals in the first period, marking the first time they’€™ve done so all season.

The only players with a negative even-strength Corsi in the first period were Campbell and linemates Jordan Caron and Daniel Paille. Then again, Campbell scored after being sent out as the extra attacker on a delayed penalty call, so there really wasn’€™t much not to like about the first period.

SODERBERG LINE DOMINANT

Claude Julien‘€™s biggest fear is the thought of splitting up Carl Soderberg, Loui Eriksson and Chris Kelly. Monday was the latest example as to why.

The Soderberg line was simply dominant against Detroit’€™s third line of Darren Helm between Johan Franzen and Gustav Nyquist, while also outworking Detroit’€™s second line on a first-period possession that led to a delayed penalty on which Campbell as an extra attacker scored. Soderberg would add a goal of his own shortly after off a nice feed from Eriksson behind the net.

Soderberg had six shots on goal in the game, which tied a career-high accomplished once last season.

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Read More: Carl Soderberg, Milan Lucic, Patrice Bergeron,
David Krejci thinks Bruins should prioritize first line, too 12.22.14 at 4:05 pm ET
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David Krejci might want to know who his right wing is as much as anyone else.

Claude Julien‘€™s hands are tied. Partially because of Krejci’€™s injuries, he waited too long to try Loui Eriksson with Krejci and Milan Lucic. Eriksson has undeniable chemistry with Carl Soderberg and Chris Kelly, but the Bruins haven’€™t given him a chance to develop chemistry with Lucic and Krejci. Given where they currently fall in the standings, the B’€™s might not think they can afford a games-long getting-to-know-you period if the B’€™s don’€™t win games in the process.

So that leaves Krejci, who thought he knew who he’€™d have for linemates after Jarome Iginla left, with four different right wings (Seth Griffith, Simon Gagne, Craig Cunningham and, ever so briefly, Eriksson) in 14 games this season.

“Everything was –€” it looked like we were going to play with Loui from the beginning. If not, then someone else, so it was kind of a tough situation,” Krejci told WEEI.com Monday. “I was preparing myself the whole summer [as though] I would be playing with Loui. That was on my mind. Then some injuries and those guys play pretty well together right now with Carl and Kells as a line, so yeah.”

Added Krejci: “I’€™m happy that we’€™re winning, but I’€™d like to be putting some points up as well. That’€™s why I’€™m here. That’€™s why they re-signed me. It gets a little frustrating at times. You always play with somebody else, but I’€™m sure we’€™re going to find the right guy. If not, who knows what happens? There’€™s always trades, you know.”

On Sunday, Julien finally started Eriksson on Krejci’€™s right wing to open the game. The line had a so-so first period, but allowed a second-period goal and followed it up with a shift that saw Krejci give the puck away and Lucic mishandle the puck at the blue line. Krejci’€™s misplay led to a Sabres scoring chance; Lucic’€™s forced Dougie Hamilton to trip Tyler Ennis in the neutral zone and put the Bruins on the penalty kill.

Julien returned Eriksson to Soderberg’€™s line, with Kelly scoring on the trio’€™s first shift back together. Eriksson scored the game-winner in overtime on a feed from Lucic, but it was during a line change.

While Eriksson with Kelly and Soderberg has been Boston’€™s most consistent line this season, it isn’€™t like any of Boston’€™s forwards are having particularly good seasons. The Bruins are the only team in the league without a nine-goal scorer. They’€™re one of three teams (with the Sabres and Coyotes the other two) who haven’€™t seen a player reach 10 goals.

Part of the Bruins’€™ offensive problem has been that they’€™ve only had Krejci for 14 games, leading Julien to mix and match different lines and play Soderberg’€™s line against other team’€™s top forwards and defensemen. Krejci’€™s return allows the Soderberg line to go back to playing against bottom-six players and third-pairing defensemen, which makes their job easier.

In a perfect world, the Bruins shouldn’€™t need Eriksson to win those shifts, as Soderberg is probably a little better than a third-line player, while Kelly has been a solid third-liner for years.

The Bruins value secondary scoring, but having a good first line is more important. The Bruins are better off when Krejci is at his best, and Krejci’€™s at his best when he’€™s comfortable with his linemates rather than taking turns training potential candidates.

So maybe it’€™s Eriksson and maybe it’€™s somebody else, but teams don’€™t miss the playoffs because they don’€™t have great third lines; they do because they don’€™t have first lines. Krejci is eager for Boston’€™s to take shape.

Read More: Carl Soderberg, David Krejci, Loui Eriksson,
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