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Patrice Bergeron gives Claude Julien endorsement 04.23.15 at 1:58 pm ET
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Patrice Bergeron was made available to the media Thursday to discuss his Selke candidacy, but he was well aware that the Bruins have bigger things to worry about than awards this summer.

Bergeron gave Claude Julien a vote of confidence, saying that he enjoys playing for the longtime Bruins coach. Julien is currently in limbo, as the B’€™s recently fired general manager Peter Chiarelli and said that the next GM will decide whether Julien stays or goes. Julien has been Boston’€™s coach for the last eight years.

“By all means, I like Claude; I like playing for Claude,” Bergeron said. “We’€™ll see what happens with that.”

Bergeron said he sent Chiarelli a text last week expressing his gratitude for all Chiarelli had done for him. Chiarelli is reportedly in talks with the Oilers about joining their front office.

It is unknown who will replace Chiarelli, though the Bruins have some internal candidates in Don Sweeney and John Furguson. Bergeron said he’€™s confidently Neely will make the right decision.

“I’€™m not concerned. I’€™m a player. It’€™s definitely out of my control, but I have full confidence and support in what upper-management, the decision they’€™ll make,” Bergeron said. “[Nine] years ago now, they hired Peter and no one knew what was going to happen and we won a Stanley Cup. I’€™m definitely going to leave it in their hands again and I’€™m sure they’€™re going to make the right decision one more time.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Patrice Bergeron, Peter Chiarelli,
On his birthday, here’s a fun Claude Julien arrest story from his younger days at 10:21 am ET
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Editor’s note: We had planned on running this story between the end of the regular season and the playoffs, but the end of the Bruins’ season has changed many, many things. We figured his 55th birthday would be a good day to tell the story and lighten the mood.

Sitting in a New Brunswick jail cell, a veteran professional hockey player tried to calm down his partners in crime.

“Guys,”€ future Jack Adams and Stanley Cup winner Claude Julien told his young AHL teammates in the fall of 1987. “€Just relax, guys. Answer the questions.”

Goaltender Ron Tugnutt, who was in his first professional season with the Fredericton Express, thought it was a joke. So too did the other handful of players. Tugnutt responded with an answer that could today cost someone their press pass.

“€œYeah, OK, Claude,”€ Tugnutt shot back, mocking Julien.

Earlier in the night, Julien his teammates were hiding in bushes with baseball bats when they were stopped by the police, roughed up and thrown in jail. Tugnutt wanted to doubt the validity of the group’€™s arrest.

Any hope that it was a joke went away at around 2 a.m. That’€™s when head coach Ron Lapointe walked in.

“All of a sudden my face went, ‘€˜Oh Jesus,’€™”€ Tugnutt recalled.

“He goes, ‘€˜This is an embarrassment. We’€™re going to pack your equipment up. We’€™re sending you guys home.’€™ Right then and there I said, ‘€˜OK, it’€™s 2 in the morning and my head coach is there.’€™ I said, ‘€˜Oh. My. God.’€™

“I said, ‘€˜This is really happening.’€™ Then it became a reality.”

After leaving the police station, Julien, Tugnutt, their small group of teammates and Lapointe went straight to the rink, where the players started to gather their belongings.

“We’€™re packing up our equipment and all of a sudden we hear a bunch of laughs,” Tugnutt said, “€œand it’€™s all the veterans in the shower coming out laughing that they got us.”

That’€™s right. There was once a time here on planet Earth when a group of adults wanted to pull off an exceptionally elaborate practical joke — one that involved the police — and deemed Claude Julien the man for the job.

To his credit, Julien pulled it off. He invited the players on what he called a “€œsnipe hunt,”€ which Wikipedia defines as a practical joke that involves “experienced people making fun of credulous newcomers by giving them an impossible or imaginary task.” Tugnutt and company took the bait.

“We were out in a bush with bats and nets,” Tugnutt said. “€œApparently we were going out there to catch some of these ‘€˜snipe birds.’€™ I was a kid from Toronto and I was like, ‘€˜Yeah, whatever. I’€™ve never heard of these things.”€™’€

A kid from the city was the perfect player to fall for such a prank, but the work that Julien and his teammates put in was enough to fool anyone.

“The police would be waiting for us. They knew exactly where those rookies would be, which area,” Julien recalled late in the season with a smile. “It was all pre-planned. They’€™d get arrested and be brought to jail. I would kind of be in that group so it wouldn’€™t look too suspicious.

“As they would be in the cell, [the police] would come and get me to tell me I had a phone call to make to get a lawyer for all of us. I would go out there and we’€™d kind of have a good giggle at their expense.”

The ‘€œsnipe hunt’€ doesn’€™t happen anymore. Why? Because while teams like a good laugh and bonding experience, they don’€™t like injuries.

“€œIt was a good gig that we had for years in Fredericton,”€ Julien said. “I think it ended up in a situation long after we were gone where I think Marc Lamothe got really upset, punched a wall and ended up breaking his wrist. That was the end of that gig.”

Clearly, Julien’€™s teammates didn’€™t know him well, as they should have known something was up when he suggested they use bats instead of baseball gloves. If Julien’€™s detractors have taught us anything, it’€™s that Julien hates home runs and wants to win every game, 0-0.*

*Reminder: Julien’€™s Bruins finished top-five in the NHL in scoring in three of the four years prior to this season.

Read More: Claude Julien, Ron Tugnutt,
Cam Neely says next general manager will decide Claude Julien’s fate 04.15.15 at 4:57 pm ET
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While Peter Chiarelli’s fate is known, Claude Julien‘s isn’t.

Cam Neely and Charlie Jacobs said in Wednesday’s press conference that a decision has still not been made on whether Julien will be kept or fired. Neely made it clear that just because Julien hasn’t been fired yet, it doesn’t mean he won’t be.

“It hasn’€™t fully been made,’€ Neely said of the decision. “We met with Claude this morning, Charlie and I. We told him that we really believe that once we go through the exhaustive search to find the next general manager, we will leave it up to that GM to decide what he wants to do on our coaching staff. Claude certainly understood that, but that’€™s where we left it.”

If the Bruins wait to fire Julien, the coach could miss out on other jobs. Julien signed a multi-year extension with the Bruins prior to this season and, if fired, would be paid it until he got a new job.

As such, there would be no incentive for Julien to quit while in limbo.

“We told him the situation and we asked him, and he said, ‘€˜I signed a contract to coach here and I want to coach here,’€™ so he made that clear when he left,” Neely said. “We had planned to meet with him in the next couple days to sit down about the season and talk to him about this past season. That’€™s next on our agenda with Claude.”

Asked whether the Bruins would consider “trading” Julien for draft picks, Neely said the team had yet to consider it.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Cam Neely, Claude Julien,
Peter Chiarelli, Claude Julien unsure of job security with Bruins 04.13.15 at 1:24 pm ET
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Peter Chiarelli and Claude Julien held their annual breakup day press conference Monday at TD Garden. They’€™re well aware it could be their last public appearance as Bruins employees.

After missing the playoffs for the first time since 2006-07, both Julien and Chiarelli are at risk of losing their jobs. Chiarelli seemingly had authorization to notify Gregory Campbell and Daniel Paille that the Bruins would not be re-signing them. As such, he said he is able to handle this breakup day the way he has in previous years.

Charlie Jacobs said in January that missing the playoffs would be unacceptable and that the team’s leadership was under review.

“The job uncertainty, the questions surrounding us is part of the job and you have to deal with it and move forward, but it hasn’€™t impacted my interviews, my discussions, my dealings with Claude,” Chiarelli said. “Business as usual.”

Julien and Chiarelli don’€™t know whether they’€™re staying or going. They also don’€™t know when they’€™ll be notified.

“I couldn’€™t tell you,” Chiarelli said. “As I said, business as usual until we hear otherwise.”

This is the first time in Julien’€™s eight-year tenure in Boston that the Bruins have not made the playoffs. Asked if one year was enough to warrant being on the hot seat, Julien said it doesn’€™t matter.

“The bottom line is it’€™s a tough business and right now it’€™s not my decision to make,” Julien said. “It will all depend on how it’€™s being viewed from above me and [I’€™ll] deal with it from there. I’€™m like Peter. I’€™ve had exit interviews today with players and my job continues just like any other year. Again, I’€™m kind of repeating what Peter said: Unless I’€™m told otherwise, I’€™ve got to continue to do that.

“I’€™ve been here for eight years and enjoy being here and certainly look forward to staying here. Again, having said that, I also understand the nature of this business.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Peter Chiarelli,
Pierre McGuire on MFB: Bruins would have made playoffs with Jarome Iginla, Johnny Boychuk at 1:05 pm ET
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Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

NBC Sports NHL analyst Pierre McGuire joined Middays with MFB to discuss the Bruins failure to make the playoffs and the decisions that face the team in the offseason. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

The Bruins sat in playoff position heading into the last three games of the season but failed to win any of them and were passed by the Senators. This marks the first year the B’s have missed the postseason since 2008 season.

“I took the Bruins to make the playoffs, I thought the Bruins would have a great run,” McGuire said. “I’m totally wrong on that, they did not. But I think one of the ways you can track it, the two players that they lost.”

Before the season, Bruins management allowed free agent forward Jarome Iginla to leave and traded defenseman Johnny Boychuk to the Islanders for draft picks.

“I think the biggest thing is, I’m looking at it this season and I’m seeing 29 goals from Jarome Iginla that are in Colorado, and I’m seeing over 22 minutes a game from Johnny Boychuk and nine goals with the New York Islanders and over 35 points with the New York Islanders,” McGuire said. “Just those two players alone, you lose those two players for nothing basically, and that basically tilts your season, especially when you compound it with all the injuries the Bruins had.”

Added McGuire: “Let’s just say for the sake of argument that [Iginla] only scores 15. I guarantee you those 15 goals get you in the playoffs. … Boychuk, let’s just say that he only plays 16 minutes a game rather than 22. He’s still going to give you 35 points.”

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Read More: Bruins, Claude Julien, Pierre McGuire,
Bruins lament failure of season 04.11.15 at 11:34 pm ET
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TAMPA, Fla. — The Bruins never gained traction this season and now it’€™s over. Though injuries and the team’€™s coaches/management will be blamed for the team’€™s demise, the team’€™s motor was seemingly busted all season.

“When you don’€™t make the playoffs, you’€™ve failed,” Claude Julien said after the Bruins finished ninth in the Eastern Conference.

For all the team’€™s inconsistency this season, the Bruins were in control of a playoff spot entering the final week of the season. Boston sat third in the Atlantic Division entering their season-ending three-game road trip, but regulation losses in Washington and Florida left the Bruins needing teams like the Senators and Penguins to lose in order for Boston to get in.

That didn’€™t happen and the Bruins got what was coming.

“I really don’€™t have an answer,”€ Chris Kelly said. “You’€™d think at the most critical time, we’€™d be playing our best hockey, and that wasn’€™t the case. It was in our hands and we let it get away. This is ultimately what happens.”

Kelly and other leaders called out the team at multiple points in an effort to return to the success of seasons past, but their efforts rarely took.

“I mean, you talk about it all the time. You talk about, ‘€˜We need to have everybody going. We need to do this, we need to do that,’€™ and at the end of the day I just think a lot of it is mental,” Tuukka Rask said. “We never really got to that comfort zone. It seemed like we were nervous a lot of times out there and just couldn’€™t overcome that as a team. It’€™s frustrating, but I really don’€™t know why that happened.”

Now, the Bruins will not play postseason hockey for the first time since 2006-07.

“We could have been better. We could have been more consistent throughout the year,” Zdeno Chara said. “It’€™s been a tough year for us all around. I think everybody could have been better.”

Read More: Chris Kelly, Claude Julien, Tuukka Rask, Zdeno Chara
Bruins cling to what little hope remains as they prepare for Lightning at 12:43 pm ET
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TAMPA, Fla. — By all accounts, the Bruins treated Friday like a regular off-day: no big team-dinner, no major group outing, just a day to clear their heads.

When they awoke Saturday, some of the shock of their situation had subsided. Whether overcompensating or genuinely confident, Claude Julien sported his bravest face in the team’€™s morning skate as he and his players held on to the slightest bit of hope that they could still find a way into the playoffs. With the Penguins losing in regulation Friday, the Bruins are at least feeling a little better than they did following Thursday’€™s 4-2 loss to the Panthers. No matter what happens with Ottawa or Pittsburgh Saturday, however, the Bruins must beat the Lightning Saturday in addition to getting help.

“It’€™s pretty obvious that you have an opportunity here tonight,” Julien said. “I don’€™t think you need to go back on the last game. I think our first period was the energy that we needed; we just couldn’€™t sustain it for three periods, so you end up with a loss. Do you keep going back to that or do you keep going to the excitement and the excitement that you have tonight. I think that’€™s what we’€™ve got to do here as a team.”

The Bruins did not do line rushes in Saturday’€™s morning skate. All that is known is that Tuukka Rask will start and the only six defensemen on the roster will play. How the forward lines look and who will be scratched up front is unknown.

On the other side, the Bruins may catch a bit of a break if Jonathan Drouin doesn’€™t play. The star rookie left wing was not at Saturday’€™s morning skate and is under the weather. His status for the game is unknown, but Tampa did recall Jonathan Marchessault on an emergency basis. Defensemen Braydon Coburn, Andrej Sustr and Jason Garrison, as well as forward Jason Killorn, are all out with injuries.

If the Penguins lose to the Sabres in regulation and the Bruins get any kind of win, Boston will get in over Pittsburgh. If the Penguins lose in overtime or a shootout, the Bruins could get in with a regulation or overtime win. The other scenario in which Boston could sneak into the playoffs would be with a regulation or overtime win and a Senators regulation loss to the Flyers.

Either scenario would result in the Bruins getting a wild card spot. Should they reach the playoffs, they will play either the Rangers or the Canadiens in the first round.

They know that is unlikely. In the meantime, they will try to earn a bit of luck with their best effort of the season.

“There is something to play for tonight. We have to take that mentality into the night that there’€™s still a lot on the line and we need to win a hockey game in order to hopefully end up in the playoff picture,” Milan Lucic said. “Obviously, some things have to happen. It’€™s not the situation that we want to be in. Again, some things can happen. It always seems like we always have to do things the hard way. Here’€™s one of those situations again.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Milan Lucic,
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