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Claude Julien: Game 1 loss ‘certainly won’t’ keep Bruins from coming back 06.13.13 at 1:48 am ET
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Claude Julien doesn’t believe Thursday morning’s heartbreaking end to Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals will have a lingering effect on his team. Julien pointed to the 2011 Cup finals when the Bruins lost the first two games in Vancouver before coming back to win the Cup.

Julien was asked if the veteran make-up of his roster will help in preventing hangover from the 4-3 loss to Chicago in triple overtime.

“Not really,” Julien said. “Last time we won the Cup, we lost the first two games to Vancouver. It never stopped us from coming back. This
certainly won’t.

“When you look at the game, it could have gone either way. I thought we had some real great looks in overtime. With a little bit of luck, we could have ended it before they did. But that’s the name of the game. They got a good break on their tying goal going off one of our skates. That’s the way the game goes. Some nights you get the break going your way, some nights you don’t. As far as I’m concerned, two good teams tonight that played extremely hard. Unfortunately there’€™s a loser and a winner.

“It’s never easy to lose a game when you’re in the third overtime period. I liked our first period. Second period was OK until those three penalties. Kind of gave them momentum and took it away from us. But, you know, I thought that in overtime we got better. We got a little stronger. We had some great looks, some great opportunities, we just didn’t bury them. Eventually somebody is going to score a goal as fatigue sets in. [I’m] not disappointed in our effort. There’s certain things you’re going to want to fix for next game. But as far as the game is concerned, it was a hard-fought game.”

Julien also had a good-natured jab at Andrew Shaw, who scored off a double deflection for the game-winner. Julien was asked how Shaw fits in on a Chicago team full of stars.

“Where does he fit in?” Julien asked the reporter. “I don’t think we do our game-planning around Mr. Shaw. Our game plan is against the Chicago Blackhawks. We know he’s an agitator. We know he’s good at embellishing, too, at times. We know all that stuff. We’ve done our research.”

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Read More: 2013 Stanley Cup, Andrew Shaw, Boston Bruins, Chicago Blackhawks
Matchups, smatchups: Claude Julien not worried about Blackhawks lines 06.12.13 at 2:14 pm ET
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CHICAGO — Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville appears set to keep Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane separated to begin the Stanley Cup finals, but the Bruins are confident they’ll be able to deal with the spread-out star power.

As Kane said Tuesday, the Blackhawks have a strong top six regardless of whether Toews and Kane are together. If they’re on different lines, that means Toews is playing with Marian Hossa, so the Bruins will have their hands full either way. Claude Julien is confident the B’s can match up with the Blackhawks no matter what Quenneville throws at them.

“It doesn’t,” Julien said when asked about how Quenneville’s new lines impacts their preparations. “We just have to react to it in a way whoever is on the ice. Whoever is on the ice has to be aware of the other team’s players on the ice.

“In our system, everybody knows our game without the puck is important. I think that’s what has gotten us this far, we’ve respected that, back’€‘checked. Our numbers coming back have continued. Whether I have my fourth line out,you can talk about like [Chris] Kelly and [Daniel] Paille, I don’t think anybody is worried about their game defensively, and Shawn Thornton who has done a great job on that line as well. There’s a lot of trust in our coaching staff when those guys are out there, even when they put a top line on.”

The guess here is that Julien will counter the Sharp-Toews-Hossa line with the Zdeno Chara-Dennis Seidenberg pairing and the David Krejci line, while putting the Patrice Bergeron line and Andrew Ference-Johnny Boychuk pairing against the Bickell-Handzus-Kane line. Of course, look for Julien to find ways to get Chara out there against both lines whenever he can. Julien matches lines as well as anybody in the business, but at the end of the day it’s Chara who makes the biggest impact in matchups.

“That’s why I talk about the matchups up front. Not the end of the world,” Julien said. “You’ll probably see, as every other series, our back end matches up a little more aggressively than our front end.

“Joel already knows that, too, by the way.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Jonathan Toews, Patrick Kane,
Tuukka while, but patient Rask ready to step into spotlight 06.10.13 at 9:38 pm ET
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Jaromir Jagr didn’€™t know where he was shooting the puck. He just wanted to put it on net.

‘€œGood goalies, they always hate to be scored on, even if practice,’€ said Jagr. ‘€œThey remember every shot, they remember every goal somebody score. And they tell you after the practice, ‘€˜You lucky.’€™ They all remember your shot.’€

Tuukka Rask stands four wins away from making a permanent mark on the Bruins franchise. By winning a Stanley Cup, the soon-to-be restricted free agent can secure a golden contract, erase any doubts over his play, and forever remove the shadow of Tim Thomas. But the soft-spoken, most ‘€œnormal’€ goalie Bruins coach Claude Julien has ever had the pleasure of coaching is no different than any other goalie when it comes down to one simple fact: He hates when you score on him.

‘€œTuukka hate it,’€ Jagr confirmed. ‘€œSometimes you just shoot it in the air because you don’€™t want him to be mad. I scored on Tuuka, I score one goal, and he come to me and say, ‘€˜[Expletive], you never shoot there! You always shoot over there!’€™ He know where you shoot in practice. How am I supposed to know? I don’€™t even know where I am shooting.’€

Rask’€™s play is persuading people to forget about the quirky yet extremely talented Thomas. While Thomas refuses to speak to anyone associated with the Fourth Estate, Rask has played outstanding in goal. Through the first three rounds, the 26-year-old Rask’€™s 2013 playoff numbers are even slightly better than Thomas’€™ from the Stanley Cup run in 2011. While Thomas had a .932 save percentage and 2.28 goals-against average, Rask’€™s numbers are even more spectacular. He has a .943 save percentage and an outstanding 1.75 GAA, and stopped 134 of the 136 shots the Pittsburgh put on net in the 4-0 sweep of the vaunted Penguins.

‘€œI feel good,’€ said Rask. ‘€œI don’€™t feel any better than I’€™ve felt all throughout the playoffs. The team is helping me out a lot. You let in two goals in [four] games, you’€™re making some good saves, but we’€™re blocking shots and taking care of the rebounds pretty well.’€

RASK DEFLECTS PUCKS AND PRAISE

Rask is adept at stopping pucks as well as deflecting praise. It simply isn’€™t in his nature to bask in the glory of his play or take all of the credit for shutting down a team like the Penguins.

‘€œI was feeling good, seeing the puck a lot, being patient, and made some good saves,’€ said Rask. ‘€œBut nobody wins these games by themselves. Our defense did a really good job, and a lot of credit goes to them, too.’€

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Read More: Claude Julien, Jaromir Jagr, Tim Thomas, Tuukka Rask
Claude Julien: ‘There’s no doubt we’re hungry’ at 5:02 pm ET
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The Bruins have reached the Stanley Cup finals for the second time in three years. And being back so soon hasn’t diminished the thirst to drink from the Cup, some Claude Julien pointed out Monday after another practice at TD Garden.

“I would think so,” Julien responded when asked if the desire to win it all still burns. “There’€™s no reason why it wouldn’€™t. Anybody that makes it this far know how hard it is. There’€™s no doubt we’€™re hungry.”

That doesn’t mean Julien won’t press a few buttons, something he did mid-practice Monday when he brought all of his troops together for a high-spirited discussion.

Beyond that, Julien and his staff are busy right now trying to impart the right information on the Blackhawks to his troops without bordering on information overload.

“That part of it hasn’€™t changed for us. Even if we haven’€™t played them we’€™ve taken the same approach as far as giving information,” Julien said. “Same thing, even if you’€™ve played them you don’€™t want to give them information overload. Like I said, we do all the research as coaches and we have all that stuff for ourselves, so if we need it we can share it with the players. We give them the basics and you give them the things that you really have to be careful with.

“That way you don’€™t kind of handcuff your players not to play their games because they’€™re overthinking. It really is all about your team and how well you want to play, and whatever they do extremely well you try to adjust to that. Not anymore than that, even though we haven’€™t played them it’€™s really about us having confidence in our game and trying to minimize their strengths like we’€™ve done with every other team so far.”

Most importantly, Julien made it clear that despite the speed the Hawks possess through the neutral zone in players like Marian Hossa, Patrick Kane and Patrick Sharp, the Bruins have to stick to their game plan and have a strong forecheck in the offensive zone.

“Our forecheck has to be our forecheck,” Julien said. “It’€™s got to be efficient in order to minimize that. And that means putting pucks in the right places. If you don’€™t, they’€™ll have some easy breakouts. They excel at that area. They have a lot of D’€™s back there that can carry the puck and skate well, so there’€™s no doubt that that’€™s going to be a key. Some of our success will be how good we are in those areas.”

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Read More: 2013 Stanley Cup, Boston Bruins, Chicago Blackhawks, Claude Julien
Shawn Thornton on D&C: ‘You never really expect to sweep a [Penguins] team with that much firepower’ at 10:13 am ET
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Bruins forward Shawn Thornton joined Dennis & Callahan on Monday to talk about the Bruins’ Stanley Cup playoff run.

The Bruins open the Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday in Chicago against the Blackhawks, who led the league with 77 points in the abbreviated regular season.

Thornton spent five years in the Chicago organization and made his NHL debut with the Blackhawks in the 2002-03 season, so he has some familiarity with a few of the current Blackhawks.

“I think their back end is as mobile as anybody’s in the NHL,” Thornton said. “I think that they’re a puck-possession team. If you give them their opportunities, if you turn that puck over they get going the other way in a hurry. They have some really, really crafty forwards up front also with [Patrick] Kane and [Jonathan] Toews and [Marian] Hossa. You definitely have to be careful.

“They’re similar in that way with the Penguins. But it’s kind of tough to compare them; we haven’t played against them this year. I only know from playing with those guys years back. I don’t really watch a whole lot of hockey.”

The Bruins are coming off a surprising four-game sweep of the top-seeded Penguins in the Eastern Conference finals. The B’s shut down Pittsburgh’s heralded offensive stars and limited the Penguins to two goals in four games.

“I honestly did not think we’d be able to shut those guys down for a whole series. Sweep was a little surprising, too,” Thornton said. “I liked the feeling in our room after we were up 2-0. I liked the feeling in our room after we were up 3-0 and going into Game 4. But you never really expect to sweep a team with that much firepower.”

Added Thornton: “Our D did an unbelievable job. The forwards helped out, but you’ve got to give the D and Tuukka [Rask] a lot of credit. And our penalty-killers. A lot of blocked shots. A lot of being in the right position. A lot of layers. A lot of hard work defensively. Definitely not easy. They had their chances, too. They hit a few posts and stuff like that. But I think for the most part we did as good a job as can be done against those guys.”

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Read More: Claude Julien, Dan Bylsma, Shawn Thornton, Tuukka Rask
Andy Brickley on M&M: Kaspars Daugavins the right call to replace Gregory Campbell 06.07.13 at 1:46 pm ET
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Andy Brickley, the color commentator for the Bruins on NESN, called into Mut & Merloni on Friday afternoon, and he wholeheartedly agreed with Claude Julien‘s apparent decision to play Kaspars Daugavins Friday night after Gregory Campbell broke his leg in Wednesday’s double-overtime win.

Daugavins skated as the third-line left winger during the Bruins morning skate and appears set to fill that role as the Bruins and Penguins face off at TD Garden Friday night.

“You have to look at it this way: What players are available in the absence of Gregory Campbell? And what are we losing in Gregory Campell?” Brickley said. “You’€™re losing an energy guy, a real good faceoff guy, a penalty-killer, reliable, accountable ‘€” all those things that you want in your role-playing centerman.”

Brickley said once Julien split up Rich Peverley and Chris Kelly to center the bottom two lines, Daugavins makes the most sense of the options, including Jay Pandolfo, Carl Soderberg and Jordan Caron.

“Which player has the most trust of the coaching staff, and which player gives your team the greater flexibility and versatility if you have to shorten the bench or you get into a special teams game?” Brickley asked. “Daugavins is probably your best bet.”

Brickley, like many, many others the last two days, lauded Campbell for sticking it out for the rest of his shift after breaking his leg while blocking a shot during Wednesday’s marathon Game 3. He said the effort exemplified “the [hockey] culture, how these guys grew up,” and Campbell finishing his shift was a high-risk, high-reward situation.

“I know there was some discussion whether he should’€™ve just lied down and writhed in pain in order to get the whistle — but I don’€™t think it would have come — so he did what he had to do,” Brickley said. “The impact that that can have if you survive that penalty-killing situation, but then get yourself to the bench, the message received by the players [about] how committed you are.”

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Read More: Claude Julien, Gregory Campbell, Kaspars Daugavins, Torey Krug
Don Cherry on D&C: Brad Marchand ‘no pest’ at 12:15 pm ET
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Hockey Night in Canada analyst Don Cherry checked in with Mut & Merloni on Friday to discuss the Stanley Cup playoffs.

Cherry already is looking forward to a Bruins-Blackhawks Stanley Cup finals.

“Every guy on that team has an edge, and they play with an edge, the Bruins,” Cherry said. “I don’t know when they get on against Chicago and that. But I know one thing, boy, they’re playing smoking now. And when Chicago wins — and they’re going to win, too — that’s going to be a bang-up series. Chicago doesn’t hit — I know I’m jumping ahead a little here — but they’d better be ready because it’s going to be a tough series for them. There’s a few guys on Chicago that I think you’re going to hear footsteps.”

Cherry credited Claude Julien with using a more cautious strategy in overtime of Game 3.

“One thing I’ve never seen before in the playoffs or any time: Everybody, when you get in the OT, you always say attack, get it over with quick, attack, attack, get it in the first five minutes. The Bruins, if you watch, they had five guys back. I’ve never seen it before. They had five guys back, waiting for them to come, sitting and waiting for a break. I’ve never seen that before. And they got the break when [Jaromir] Jagr took the puck off [Evgeni] Malkin, and they went in. ‘€¦ You watch, just before the goal, they were back at the red line, waiting for a break. Boy, it really paid off, I’ll tell you.”

Brad Marchand has received accolades for his aggressive play and clutch offense but also criticism for delivering some cheap shots to Penguins players. Cherry defended the young winger.

“He’s not a pest,” Cherry said. “A pest is a guy that will get you about three or four goals, or five or six goals, that will go around jabbing guys and stuff like that. This guy is above all that because he can score goals. He’s what you call a good player that goes around looking for trouble, causes disturbances and that. ‘€¦ You just can’t call him a pest or dirty or anything like that, he’s too good a player for that. He’s above that stuff. He’s just a good, honest, hard player that can score goals. That’s the why I look at it. He’s no pest.”

Gregory Campbell has become a cult hero for playing with a broken leg after blocking a shot on the penalty kill in the second period of Game 3.

“There’s no other sport in the world [in which] a guy will play with a broken leg. ‘€¦ That’s the spirit of the Bruins,” Cherry said.

To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page. For more Bruins news, visit the team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Brad Marchand, Claude Julien, Don Cherry, Gregory Campbell
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