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Fan suffers cardiac episode at Bruins practice 01.17.13 at 1:31 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — It was a very scary scene at Ristuccia Arena Thursday as one fan had a cardiac episode in the stands, stopping the Bruins’ practice and providing Terry Gardner to be an unlikely hero.

Gardner, an EMT, was watching practice from the stands when he heard somebody scream to call 911. He rushed over to the fan and recognized agonal breathing (gasping). He began performing chest compressions on him as uniformed paramedics showed up and used the defibrillator machine to determine that it was a cardiac episode before eventually reviving him and taking him to the hospital.

“It was a cardiac episode,” Gardner explained. “The [defibrillator] picked up a shockable rhythm on him, which means that it was a cardiac issue. It obviously wasn’t a seizure, but it appeared to be at first because at that point he was still moving, he had rapid breathing at first. That’s what it appeared to be at first. It only took a couple seconds before that subsided, and it became apparent that he needed CPR.”

Gardner said that the presence of the defibrillator machine, which was on hand at Ristuccia, was critical in saving the fan.

“They had the defibrillator here on scene, which probably made a world of difference for him,” he said. “If this happened at home, it may not have had such a good outcome.”

The Bruins, meanwhile, all took a knee as fans scattered to make room. Claude Julien then pulled them off the ice until everything was resolved.

“Obviously we knew something was going on in the stands and that it was an emergency,” Julien said. “I don’t know the details of what happened, but all I saw was a bunch of people there on the spot obviously helping. As far as I’m concerned, I thought when we stepped on the ice and found out what was happening, I think the last thing they needed was to hear pucks banging off the glass. I think out of respect we just let them do their job.”

The players were both relieved and thankful to see a fan step up in such a critical situation.

“That’s incredible,” Gregory Campbell said of Gardner’s work. “Obviously that gentleman was lucky to have that. For somebody to have that knowledge is an important thing. You never know when that’s going to come in handy, and that’s very special.”

Gardner showed up to Ristuccia on Thursday planning to watch the B’s practice, but as an EMT, he is always ready to be called to action. The circumstances were certainly different this time around, but he was glad to help.

“Having the spotlight on you is definitely a little weird,” he said. “I don’t normally work with this kind of crowd when we do it coming with the ambulance and stuff like that. It’s definitely a little weird having the Bruins watch you, as opposed to you watching the Bruins. It was a little role reversal.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Gregory Campbell,
Why Claude Julien is a perfect fit for the Bruins 07.24.12 at 3:49 pm ET
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There are plenty of reasons Peter Chiarelli and Bruins management decided to extend the contract of Claude Julien this week.

First of all, his contract was expired after last season.

Secondly, no one else since Harry Sinden has been behind the bench as the Bruins won the Stanley Cup.

And thirdly, no one is more respected for his ability to blend character, discipline and humor the way Julien has since taking over for Dave Lewis after the 2006-07 season.

There’s another much more subtle reason to keep Julien behind the bench for the Black and Gold – stability. Should the Bruins and the rest of the NHL not figure out their pending labor issues by the Sept. 15 deadline, the season could easily be shortened, and like the NFL and NBA in 2011, teams may have to wing it to get their teams ready for competition.

No one knows more what he wants or expects from the Bruins than Julien.

“The one thing you try to do as a coach is keep things fresh,” Julien said at his contract extension press conference at TD Garden Tuesday. “Every year you try to attack certain areas that will maybe change just a little bit that will give guys a fresher look. That’s how you keep your team interested, intact and hopefully competitive.”

To Chiarelli, what he sees is a coach over five years that hasn’t just won a Stanley Cup, he’s instilled just the right amount of discipline, walking that fine line between motivation and expectation from his players.

“Leadership in a coach manifests itself different ways with different people,” Chiarelli said. “To me, I like to talk about a coach’s persona. His person in a venue like this [press conference] and his persona in the room. It’s about commanding respect. It’s about motivating the players in a respectful way and a professional way. It’s about the ideas, the formats, the approaches. It’s all professional, it’s all to an end. There’s a plan.

“Claude’s ability to have that persona and have players respect what he stands for and to be able to deliver that message in a way that engages them, that’s what I see as leadership and that’s what Claude has, and a large part of that leadership is character.”

For Julien, there have been rocky times to be sure. Remember the May 13, 2010 when the Flyers completed their comeback from 3-0 down to eliminate the Bruins? Remember in their Cup run of 2011 when P.K. Subban scored to force overtime in Game 7 in the first round. If the Bruins don’t win that game, it’s a near certainty that Julien is not up on the dais Tuesday talking about his vision for the Bruins. Even this year, when the Bruins were fading a bit in the final two months of the season, falling from first to third in the East, there were whispers that players were tuning out Julien. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Dave Lewis, Harry Sinden
Claude Julien already has his place in Bruins history at 7:21 am ET
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Claude Julien‘s stay in Boston has worked out pretty well, and to the surprise of no one, it isn’t over yet.

The Bruins announced Monday that they locked up the coach with a multi-year deal, with a press conference to take place Tuesday at TD Garden. With him will be Peter Chiarelli, the man who finally stopped the revolving door of Bruins coaches in 2007 and found the coach who could not only last more than a couple of seasons but could bring the Stanley Cup to Boston.

As far as Bruins coaches go, Julien, at 460 regular-season games coached, has a ways to go before catching Art Ross (728) and Milt Schmidt (726). Assuming he coaches every game this season, Julien will be at 542. Should he coach the following two seasons in Boston (after all, it’s a multi-year deal that will start in 2013-14), he’ll break the 700-game mark.

In many ways, Julien has perhaps been underappreciated in Boston. Though he may have once appeared to be the Marty Schottenheimer of the NHL for his ability to consistently get teams to the playoffs only to come up short in the postseason, he was there to lead the Bruins out of the mess they’d been in since the lockout and back to respectability.

In his first year on the job, Julien took Boston from a club that had previously finished 13th in the Eastern Conference to a playoff team. The Bruins grabbed the eighth and final playoff spot in 2007-08 and lost to Julien’s former team in the Canadiens, but it was the 2008-09 season — a campaign in which Julien picked up the Jack Adams Award for the league’s top coach — that things really stared to change in Boston. The B’s finished tops in the conference, and it was the first of three consecutive seasons in which the Bruins got past the first round. The last time the Bruins had accomplished such a feat was when they won at least a round in  five straight playoffs from 1988 through 1992.

Julien’s crowning achievement, of course, was the 2010-11 season in which the Bruins beat the Canadiens, Flyers, Lightning and Canucks en route to hoisting the Stanley Cup. It seemed that Julien was criticized by select media and fans more than he’d ever been in that season. The Bruins were coming off an embarrassing playoff defeat in 2010 in which they’d blown a 3-0 series lead to the Flyers, and after they were blanked by Jonas Hiller and the Ducks at home on Dec. 20 of the 2010-11 season, it seemed hard to find a fan who didn’t want Chiarelli and Cam Neely to can the coach.

In the playoffs, Julien was scrutinized for his handling of Tyler Seguin. His sticking with Michael Ryder over the then-rookie proved to be right, as Ryder’s Game 4 performance (two goals, one of which was the game-winner in overtime, and an assist) tied the team’s first-round series with the Habs. Seguin shined when he finally got his turn in the Eastern Conference finals, but Julien’s handling of the situation was correct.

Julien definitely has faced some good ol’ fashioned Boston scrutiny thus far in Boston, but if his future with the B’s matches what he’s accomplished in the recent past, fans won’t have much to (logically) complain about.

Now if only they could do something about that power play …

Read More: Claude Julien,
Bruins give Claude Julien multi-year extension 07.23.12 at 5:32 pm ET
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The Bruins have signed head coach Claude Julien to a multi-year contract extension.

Julien, the 28th coach in team history, has been with the team since 2007 and carries a record of 228-132-50 with the B’s, good for a .617 win percentage. He led Boston to its first Stanley Cup championship in 39 years in the 2010-11 season.

The Bruins will hold a press conference Tuesday at noon to announce the signing.

Read More: Claude Julien, Peter Chiarelli,
Claude Julien can’t stress enough that Patrice Bergeron will play in Game 7 04.24.12 at 1:04 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — After Patrice Bergeron missed the Bruins’ practice at Ristuccia Arena, B’s coach Claude Julien was adamant that the banged-up center will be in the lineup in Wednesday’s Game 7 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals against the Capitals.

“None at all,” Julien said when asked if there was any doubt that Bergeron would play.

Added Julien: “He’s playing next game. ‘€¦ I don’t know how much clearer I can get. He’s in.”

Bergeron suffered an injury in the third period of Saturday’s Game 5 loss. He played in Game 6, but was unable to take faceoffs, as the only draw he took came late in the third period.

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Claude Julien, Patrice Bergeron,
Shawn Thornton again takes one for the team 04.23.12 at 5:37 pm ET
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Shawn Thornton made his way out of the Bruins dressing room Monday just before reporters were allowed in. And that’s probably a good thing since he had to take one for the team on Sunday in the crucial Game 6.

With Patrice Bergeron ailing and his status uncertain, Claude Julien had to dress another skilled forward capable of carrying the play on the top two lines if needed. Jordan Caron was called upon for the first time in the series. But that meant someone had to sit. And just like Thornton sat to make room for Tyler Seguin after Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals against the Lightning last spring, Thornton was again asked to take a seat on Sunday to make room for Caron if Bergeron wasn’t 100 percent.

“Well, it certainly wasn’€™t related to play,” Claude Julien said Monday when asked about his reasoning. “It was related to a decision I had to make just before the game. Those are ‘€“ hard for me to give you that reason right now because it would probably open up a can of worms, so I’€™m going to leave it at that. It’€™s certainly not because of Thornton’€™s play; it’€™s because of necessity.”

Certainly not. Julien is well aware of the positive impact Thornton has had on his this team in their Stanley Cup run and in being an energy force on Saturday when the team was down 2-0. He delivered a pair of heavy forechecks in the Capitals zone and less than a minute later Brad Marchand was on the ice delivering the first of two goals in 28 seconds to tie the game late in the second period.

And remember, after Horton was knocked out of the Cup finals by Aaron Rome in Game 3, Thornton returned for Game 4 and was part of the “Merlot” energy line that carried play in the opening minutes of Game 7 against the Canucks last spring while the starters got their legs under them. Marchand scored two goals in that game and Thornton was again a force to be reckoned with. Don’t count him out for Game 7 on Wednesday either – if he gets the chance to play.

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Shawn Thornton
Claude Julien on Game 7: ‘We don’t make things easy’ at 5:04 pm ET
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After watching six one-goal games between the two teams, no one should be surprised that the Capitals and Bruins are headed for a winner-take-all Game 7 to decide their Eastern Conference quarterfinal series.

As a matter of fact, listening to Bruins coach Claude Julien a day after his team survived a 4-3 overtime thriller in Game 6 in Washington, it’s almost expected. Are the Bruins approaching this Game 7 the way they did in their three Game 7s of 2011, when they became the first team ever to win three Game 7s and win the Stanley Cup?

“Well I guess that’€™ll be probably answered after Game 7,” Julien said Monday at TD Garden, site of the showdown game Wednesday. “We don’€™t make things easy, we didn’€™t last year, but we got through it and we haven’€™t gotten through it this year. So I think that’€™s probably the difference right now is we need to get through Game 7 before we can look at it the same way.”

What was racing through his head when Tyler Seguin scored three minutes into OT Sunday?

“Well although I’€™m excited, I try to look calm,” Julien said. “I think that’€™s the main thing here is, you know, you kind of regroup, go into the room and you do. For me, it’€™s ‘€“ how do I keep our team focused and enjoying what they just accomplished but not let it slip to the point where you lose focus of what you have to do next. All we did last night, or yesterday afternoon, was tie the series. We didn’€™t win it. There’€™s still another game to be played; before we can be happy with this we’€™ve got to make sure we take care of Game 7. So, it’€™s exciting because it was either that or we’€™d be here today packing our bags and going home and I don’€™t think anybody’€™s ready for that right now.”

If the Bruins get the same kind of production from their top two lines as they did in Game 6, there’s good reason to think they’ll be moving on to the second round.

“I think if you look at the last two games, it’€™s true ‘€“ it’€™s not just [Sunday], it’€™s the day before, some of those guys started producing and helping us out,” Julien said. “So our secondary scoring has kept us in this series and allowed us to move forward. And now it’€™s up to those guys to take over, and they have. [Tyler] Seguin‘€™s big goal, [David] Krejci‘€™s big goal, [Milan] Lucic‘€”plays he’€™s made, Patrice, [Rich] Peverley, those kinds of guys have all been ‘€“ [Brad] Marchand. Our top two line guys have really stepped up and that’€™s made a big difference.”

In other news and notes from Monday’s media availability, the team did not practice on Monday, taking the day to rest instead, though several Bruins reported to the Garden to work out, get treatment and be available to the media. The team will practice on Tuesday in Wilmington at 11 a.m. … Julien said there was no update on injured defensemen Adam McQuaid and Joe Corvo.
McQuaid has been out the whole series since taking a hit into the boards late in the regular season from Washington’s Jason Chimera. Meanwhile, Corvo was injured in the right leg blocking a shot of Marcus Johansson on Saturday in Game 5. “As far as Joe is concerned I think he’€™s going to be fine,” Julien said. “Adam McQuaid is still at the same spot he was before we left on the road.”

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Patrice Bergeron
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