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Rivet, rivet: Bruins say broken skate the reason for Nathan Horton’s absence 05.01.11 at 2:42 pm ET
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PHILADELPHIA — Nathan Horton wasn’t on the ice as the Bruins held their Sunday practice at Wells Fargo Center, but his never-ending grin could still be seen in the team’s dressing room following the skate. Horton did only off-ice work Sunday, with he and the team explaining that it was an equipment issue that led to his absence. Horton, who famously went to a local sporting goods store to buy a stick during a prolonged scoring slump in the regular season, apparently realized he had a broken skate as he was getting ready for the practice. By the time it was realized, Horton said, coach Claude Julien told him not to bother worrying about the practice.

“His rivets popped just before going out there, so the trainer came to see me, and I said we were only going out there for 20 minutes, so by the time you get it fixed [it wouldn’t be worth it],” Julien said after practice. “He did a little off-ice workout, and it’s not a big deal. He’ll skate tomorrow morning.”

Horton led the Bruins with five shots on goal in Boston’s 7-3 win over the Flyers in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. The 25-year-old had a goal and an assist for two points and was a plus-3 on the day. Through eight playoff games, Horton has five points and a plus-2 rating.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Nathan Horton,
Claude Julien: We don’t need to change ‘a ton’ for the Flyers 04.29.11 at 2:06 pm ET
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Before the team left Boston for Philadelphia Friday, Bruins head coach Claude Julien said the Flyers are a better match up for his team than the Canadiens were in the first round. The Bruins captured three of the four meetings in the regular season and were even able to score on the power play four times, something they failed to do in 21 tries in the opening round.

“We match up well against them and they’€™re always close in tight games and we got to go in there with some confidence and obviously some determination,” Julien said. “Playoffs is a different situation than the regular season, but again as I mentioned it’€™s just one of those things that we feel that we don’€™t have to change a ton of things. And if there’€™s adjustments to make along the way, we just have to be prepared to make them.”

The Flyers, however, did not have big defenseman Chris Pronger at their disposal in the last meeting on March 27 in Philadelphia as he was still healing from the effects of a broken hand.

“He’s an experienced guy, a guy who has got good size as well and has got a good shot,” Julien said. “I know he certainly hadn’€™t used it much when he’€™s come back now. Whether he’€™s 100 percent, we don’€™t know, and it really shouldn’€™t matter to us.

“But he’€™s been a big part of their power play and when you get a guy like that back, it’€™s no doubt that it’€™s a boost for their hockey club and certainly helps. So we’ve just got to continue I guess playing the way we have been against them for most of the year this year. I thought we played them well and we came out with three wins, and I think we had the overtime loss.”

The Bruins’ only loss to the Flyers came with three seconds left in overtime on Dec. 11 at TD Garden when Mike Richards beat Tim Thomas with a wrist shot. The Bruins also showed they can win all sorts of games against Philly, 3-0, in Philly on Dec. 1, 7-5 in a Garden shootout on Jan. 13 and 2-1 on Brad Marchand’s goal late on March 27. The Bruins also appear to have the clear advantage in goal with Thomas starting all seven games of their series against Montreal while Brian Boucher was one of three different Philadelphia netminders to see action against Buffalo. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Brian Boucher, Chris Pronger
Bruins aren’t worried about quick turnaround 04.27.11 at 5:24 pm ET
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A lot has been made of the fact that the Bruins and Canadiens will be playing Game 7 less than 22 hours after the conclusion of Game 6, raising questions about whether fatigue could be a factor Wednesday night. But the Bruins themselves aren’t too concerned about the turnaround.

“We’€™re at the stage here that we got trainers, we got good people around,” Claude Julien said. “That’€™s all been taken care of, and I’€™m sure it’€™s the same for the other side. I don’€™t think there’€™s much that gets left behind nowadays. Everybody has a job to do and everybody knows how to do it. You rely on your people around you. And our players are pretty well trained athletes as well that know how to hydrate themselves. Certainly we don’€™t plan on having that as an obstacle tonight.”

Shawn Thornton said Wednesday hasn’t been any different than any other game day.

“I can’€™t speak for everybody in the dressing room, but nothing,” Thornton said when asked what, if anything, changed in his game-day routine. “We got in early enough last night that I got the same amount of sleep as I normally would. I drank the same amount of coffee. ‘€¦ Back-to-backs aren’€™t a big deal. We do them all the time.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Shawn Thornton,
Andrew Ference keeping Bruins’ Game 7 history in the past at 5:14 pm ET
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Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference has seen the Bruins come up short in Game 7 multiple times. The team has seen their last three seasons end in such games, and on Wednesday they will go for their first Game 7 victory since 1994. The 32-year-old said prior to Wednesday night’s game vs. the Canadiens that he isn’t worried about the past.

“I’m not big on the history,” Ference said. “I always kind of laugh when they say ‘all-time records’ or ‘in past years, the Bruins have done this or that.’

“It really is in the moment. You play for today. What happened last year, the year before or the last 80 years of these teams playing each other, doesn’t have an effect on tonight. What happens out there is determined by the players on these teams.”

Claude Julien can certainly agree with his defenseman. All of Julien’s seasons in Boston to this point have ended with a Game 7 loss, but it’s the last thing the coach wants to think about.

“I think what’€™s in the past is in the past and you got to play for the present,” Julien said. “This is a pretty simple message, but that’€™s the message that you have to have playing those types of games. You’€™ve got to put everything behind you and look at what you need to do here to win.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Andrew Ference, Claude Julien,
Powerless: B’s aren’t about to complain about officiating on the eve of Game 7 at 12:15 am ET
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After getting what many observers clearly felt was the raw end of the deal from the men in striped shirts Tuesday night, the Bruins still were not about to take a page out of the book of Mike Gillis.

He is the Vancouver Canucks general manager who lambasted the NHL and its officiating crew on Monday, just about 24 hours before its Game 7 Tuesday against the defending Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks Tuesday night.

Yes, the Bruins were put on not one but TWO 5-on-3 disadvantages and the Canadiens scored both times in a 2-1 win to force Game 7 less than 24 hours later in Boston. Yes, the major penalty to Milan Lucic for boarding seemed harsh, even if Jaroslav Spacek was bleeding from the head. And yes, the Bruins can’t really complain about the power play since they yet to convert a single one of 19 chances in the series.

But these Bruins know they still have Game 7 ahead. They figure that eventually the breaks have to even out – with the whistles and on the scoresheet, right?

But still it was a crushing blow to lose your top scorer with more than half the game remaining in a 1-1 contest in Game 6. But that’s what happened when Lucic was shown the gate when Spacek showed the officials blood from the hit just under five minutes into the second period – and just moments after the Bruins had tied it.

“Well, I’€™m not going to comment on it, and simply not for not getting any information, but I haven’€™t had any chance to really look at it closely,” Julien said cleverly. “And you see quick replays here and there but it’€™s something that I need to see here before I’€™m able to comment on that.”

“I can’t comment because I heard it but haven’t seen a replay at all,” added Mark Recchi. “Strange game and a lot of strange things happened out there but it’s part of it. I think 5-on-5 we were a very good hockey team tonight and we have to take that positive and go home and have our home crowd. We’ve been in this before. We have to stay focused, stay relaxed, stay positive and go from there.

“I’m not going to focus too much on what happened. It’s over now. We have to worry about [Wednesday] and can’t dwell on it and have to embrace what’s coming up [in Game 7].”

Added Patrice Bergeron, “I didn’t get a good look at it so I can’t comment on it but obviously, losing Looch, he means a lot.”

Then there was this from Tim Thomas that summed up the Bruins’ frustration.

“It was no harder than any other game,” Thomas said with a wry smile. “Obviously, when it’s 5-on-3, it’s harder to keep the puck out of the net. I’m not a forward. I don’t make or take those type of hits. I’ve already heard from some of the guys on their take on it but I don’t have one. I’m just a goalie.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Milan Lucic
Mark Recchi with the cold, hard truth: Bruins’ power play ‘needs to be a lot better than that’ 04.26.11 at 11:02 pm ET
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MONTREAL — Moments after losing Game 6 to the Canadiens, 2-1, on a pair of 5-on-3 goals, Bruins veteran Mark Recchi admitted he and his teammates need to do a better job of cashing in on their power play chances. While the Canadiens scored a pair of two-man advantage goals, the Bruins were 0-for-4 on the power play, making them scoreless in 19 chances during the series.

“We had opportunities but it wasn’t good enough for power play on our end,” Recchi said. “Five-on-five, we were terrific. They got a couple of 5-on-3 goals. We have to be a lot better, obviously. We’re not getting any sustained pressure to top it off. We’re getting one shot and it’s getting blocked half the time. We’re not getting pucks on net and so it’s one-and-out kind of thing. You have to find your way back in [the offensive zone] and then one-and-out again. We have to sustain pressure. Our power play hasn’t been that bad all year and then for right now, it hasn’t been good in this series. We get the opportunity [Wednesday], we have to step up.”

Recchi was on the Bruins last year when the team lost its last Game 7 on home ice to the Flyers, 4-3. He and the Bruins have a chance at redemption with a win on Wednesday. If they beat the Canadiens, they will again draw the Flyers in the Eastern semis starting this weekend in Philadelphia.

“It’s a big one [Wednesday],” Recchi said. “We’ll go get some rest and be ready. If we play like that 5-on-5 and if we get opportunities on the power play [in Game 7], we have to be a lot better than that.”

Recchi actually has the chance to do something about it on the ice. Claude Julien can only watch from behind the bench as the team continues to look totally out of kilter.

“Well, let’€™s put it this way, our power play is struggling,” Julien said. “I think we’€™ve talked about that every day so far. They scored two goals five-on-three. Five-on-four they weren’€™t a threat and neither were we. Five-on-five I thought we were obviously a team that held most of the control if the game and that’€™s what we have to do. We have to stay disciplined, stay away from the penalty box like we talked about at the beginning of the series.

“But I would have liked to have a five-on-three, maybe our power play would have scored as well. But it wasn’€™t the case and again, it’€™s one of those games where we tried, we worked hard, we had our chances and we weren’€™t able to bury them. But certainly not down or disappointed in our game except for the fact those five-on-threes ended up costing us the game.”

Now, it’s Game 7 – the ultimate test in hockey that the Bruins haven’t won since beating Montreal’s Patrick Roy and his case of appendicitis in 1994 at the old Boston Garden. They have lost their last four attempts, including home games in 2010 vs. the Flyers and 2009 vs. the Hurricanes.

“Just focus on getting ready,” Recchi said. “You’ve gotta relax and you’ve got to get ready to play a one-game series now. We worked all year to get home ice and we’re going home and we’ll go get a lot of rest, and focus on what we have to do, make little adjustments but for the most part we’ll just save our energy and get ready.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Mark Recchi
Claude Julien: ‘It’s about winning the last game’ at 1:48 pm ET
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MONTREAL — Although the Bruins hold a 3-2 series lead over the Canadiens in the Eastern Conference quarterfinals, much emphasis has been placed on the difficulty of closing out the Habs in Tuesday in Game 6 to prevent a possible Game 7. B’s coach Claude Julien acknowledged the challenge, but noted his team isn’t the only one needing an important win.

“Well, if it’€™s a challenge for us, it must be a pretty big challenge for them,” Julien said after Tuesday’s morning skate. “I mean, this is playoff hockey. Right now it’€™s about winning the last game. It’€™s as simple as that. There isn’t a different approach to this game from either team. They need to win to survive and we need to win to end it. So I think the approach is the same.”

Should the Bruins win, they would face Philadelphia (should the Flyers win their Game 7 against the Sabres Tuesday) or the winner of Wednesday’s Game 7 between the Penguins and Lightning. If they lose to the Habs Tuesday, the two teams would play Game 7 Wednesday at TD Garden.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien,
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