Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Claude Julien’
Tim Thomas named Vezina Trophy finalist 04.22.11 at 1:40 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

In what was pretty much a foregone conclusion, Tim Thomas was named one of three finalists for the Vezina Trophy on Friday. Vancouver’s Roberto Luongo and Nashville’s Pekka Rinne are the other two finalists.

“Very happy to hear that, obviously,” Thomas said. “After last year, I wasn’t quite sure if I’d ever hear that again.”

Thomas, of course, is referring to his up-and-down 2009-10 campaign, in which he finished the season with a 17-18-8 record to go along with a 2.56 goals-against average and .915 save percentage. He ultimately ceded the starting job to Tuukka Rask by the playoffs.

Thomas bounced back in a big way this year, though. He went 35-11-9 and led the NHL in both goals-against average (2.00) and save percentage (.938). That .938 mark was good enough to break Dominik Hasek‘s single-season save percentage record.

“I definitely have more appreciation just for the fact that I have the opportunity to play,” Thomas said. “I waited a long time in my career just for the opportunity to play in any NHL games. I wanted to have the opportunity and wanted to be able to show what I could do. And so after last year, I think it’s made every game a little bit sweeter this year.”

Claude Julien said Thomas not only deserves the nomination, but that he also deserves to win the award.

“I think it’s pretty obvious to me that Tim is very deserving of that nomination,” Julien said. “Obviously I’m a big fan of what he’s done this year, and if you ask me, he certainly deserves it. I’m sure that I would get some arguments from other places, but I’m certainly going to support Tim for the season he’s had. Especially with what he went through last year, to bounce back this year and have that kind of season, he’s certainly very deserving. I wish him all the luck and I hope he wins what he deserves.”

Thomas said that although the nomination is great and he’s certainly happy about it, he’s focused on more pressing matters right now.

“Only if you make it,” Thomas said when asked if the nomination could be a distraction. “It’s weird timing that we happen to be in the middle of a very tough first-round series. … I could talk about it right now, but my focus will immediately go back to the playoff series. I won’t be thinking about the Vezina later today.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Tim Thomas,
Andrew Ference OK with fine, maintains gesture was unintentional at 1:18 pm ET
By   |  2 Comments

Andrew Ference, who was fined $2,500 by the NHL Friday morning for his gesture after his goal Thursday night, said he was OK with the fine and understood why he was being punished.

“I talked with Mike Murphy of the NHL this morning and explained the same thing I told you guys last night,” Ference said. “He said the same thing, that it looks awful. Obviously with this series, the whole year, how it is between the Habs and the Bruins, a fine is acceptable. I had a good talk with him this morning.”

Ference stood by his claim that the gesture was unintentional. After the game, he said his glove might have gotten caught with the finger up, but that he wasn’t trying to do that.

“I was pumping my fist,” he said on Friday. “I’€™m not giving anybody the bird or anything like that. Like I told [the NHL], it was an unintentional bird. I obviously apologize for it. It wasn’€™t meant to insult anybody, especially a whole row of cameras in the Bell Centre and the fans sitting there.”

Claude Julien stood by his defenseman.

“With Andrew, I think he’s been pretty open with what he thinks of the situation,” Julien said. “His comments were pretty clear, and I’m going to support my player. That’s my job, is to support and believe your player, and that’s what I’m going to do. He’s a big boy, he’s capable of handling himself.”

Read More: Andrew Ference, Claude Julien,
Michael Ryder proves Claude Julien right, plays hero in pivotal win over Canadiens at 12:09 am ET
By   |  1 Comment

MONTREAL — To say that Michael Ryder has been the whipping boy of Bruins fans is an understatement. The $4 million man was far from that for too long after the Bruins’€™ Feb. 9 win over the Canadiens. The free-agent-to-be totaled just two goals over his final 25 games, and was even a healthy scratch three times. 

Since the playoffs began, fans and some media members have lobbied for Ryder to watch them from the press box in order to make room for Tyler Seguin in the lineup. 

On Thursday, Ryder showed that Claude Julien‘€™s decision to stick with him was the right one, ending his lengthy disappearing act with a pair of goals in Game 5 against the Canadiens, including the game-winner in overtime. Julien has coached Ryder everywhere from juniors to the AHL to Montreal to Boston, so it was only fitting that Ryder prove Julien right at Bell Centre.

‘€œI’€™ve been with him for a while,’€ Ryder said of Julien. ‘€œJust for him to give me the ice time and give me the confidence, for me, it just gives me that extra boost to show people that I can still play and still got it.’€

Ryder’€™s big night began when he tied the game at one in the second period, beating Habs netminder Carey Price with a wrist shot after taking a pass from Tomas Kaberle. From there, the weight was finally off the struggling winger’€™s shoulders. 

‘€œYou always get a little frustrated when you don’€™t score and you don’€™t get that many opportunities, but it was definitely a confidence boost,’€ Ryder said. ‘€œHopefully now our line keeps generating stuff, helping to do whatever we can to help this team.’€

He would go on to assist Chris Kelly‘€™s game-tying goal at 13:42 of the third period, which marked the third time in the game that the B’€™s came back to tie it up. They actually never led in the game until Ryder beat Price for the game-winner just 119 seconds into overtime. 

‘€œI’€™m happy for Rydes,’€ Shawn Thornton said of the winger. ‘€œA couple of guys talked about it before, he usually plays pretty well in this building,’€ Shawn Thornton said of the former Canadien. ‘€œI’€™m happy his hard work paid off. Maybe some people in Boston will lay off him now. He’€™s a good guy.’€ 

Read More: Carey Price, Chris Kelly, Claude Julien, Michael Ryder
Andrew Ference denies giving Canadiens fans ‘the finger’ 04.21.11 at 11:02 pm ET
By   |  7 Comments

MONTREAL — Following their Game 4 win over the Canadiens, Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference denied any intention of making an obscene gesture at Habs fans following his second-period goal. Following his tally, which at the time made it a 3-2 game, the veteran was caught on camera giving the middle finger to the crowd.

‘€œCoach just showed me it, and it looks awful,’€ Ference said following the win. ‘€œI just saw it and I can assure you that’€™s not part of my repertoire. I don’€™t know if my glove got caught up. I can assure you, that’€™s not part of who I am or what I ever have been. So it looks awful, I admit it, I completely apologize to how it looks. You guys have covered me long enough to know that that’€™s not part of my repertoire.

‘€œI was putting my fist in the air,’€ he added. ‘€œI’€™m sorry it does look awful. I just saw it.’€

Ference can be fined up to $2,500 for the gesture.

‘€œHonestly, I have no idea,’€ he said of whether he’€™ll pay for it. ‘€œIt looks really bad, but all I can do is tell you the truth and that’€™s the truth.’€

Coach Claude Julien said in his postgame press conference that he had not seen the play.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Andrew Ference, Claude Julien,
Miracle on Mic: Claude Julien gives the media what they want at 2:40 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

MONTREAL — Claude Julien doesn’t like to share certain things in press conferences. Questions about the lineup or goaltending are generally met with something along the lines of a short, “I guess we’ll see tonight.” On Thursday, however, Julien decided to share his sense of humor.

Following the Bruins’ morning skate, a reporter asked Julien if he saw a difference in the overall mindset of the team following their trip to Lake Placid this week. The usually serious Julien saw the opportunity and took it.

“Yeah, I saw a miracle, in case you’re looking for that word,” Julien said, referencing the 1980 Miracle on Ice and causing an eruption of laughter from the packed room of reporters and cameramen.

“No,” he continued. “I think we just went there and wanted to go and relax and have some quality practices. We weren’t looking for any miracles, we just thought that was a good place for the team to be. We went out on the ice and skated the same way we skated the last time we were here.”

“Thanks,” the reporter said, to which an amused Julien shot back, “you’re welcome.”

“We all got our quote,” another reporter mused. “We can leave now.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien,
Milan Lucic and the postseason expectations of a 30-goal scorer 04.19.11 at 6:17 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

LAKE PLACID, N.Y. — The playoffs are a time when the top talent can take over a series. Teams know which guys to account for, and the big-time goal-scorers are at or near the top of the list of guys who can change a series.

When Milan Lucic scored 30 goals in the regular season, perhaps he entered that class of players expected to do big things in the postseason. Given that he also had nine points in each of the last two postseasons, Lucic also had high expectations for himself as the Eastern Conference quarterfinals began.

So far, Lucic is the only member of the Bruins’ top line without a goal in the playoffs, as David Krejci and Nathan Horton scored the B’s first two goals in Monday’s 4-2 victory in Game 3 at the Bell Centre.

Once a player reaches the 30-goal mark in the regular mark, does he suddenly feel a responsibility to be a reliable producer? Lucic said that everyone puts pressure on themselves come the postseason, but admitted Tuesday that this time around he does expect more of himself.

“For myself, I think the first two games, I put almost too much pressure on myself to go out there and score,” Lucic said Tuesday at Whiteface Lake Placid Olympic Center. “For myself, my game, if I just simplify it and just go out there and play and just focus on just straight lines and getting pucks in deep, everything tends to take care of itself.”

Lucic was a minus-1 in each of the series’ first two games. Things seemed to be getting worse Monday when he stole the puck from P.K. Subban in the neutral zone, but got barely anything on his shot on the breakaway that ensued. The Habs brought it down the ice after the play and got on the board thanks to Andrei Kostitsyn maneuvering around Zdeno Chara and beating Tim Thomas. Instead of potentially being 4-0, it was 3-1 and the crowd made its presence felt once again. Lucic’s play improved over the rest of the game, though, and given the way things seem to be trending with his linemates, coach Claude Julien hopes Lucic will begin seeing some statistical output.

“He was better last night. If his linemates are starting to roll, usually he follows up or vice versa,” Julien said. “When those guys start playing, usually the other guys catch up to them. I’m expecting him to get even better, and we’re going to need him to be better if he expect to win this series.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, David Krejci, Milan Lucic
Claude Julien not a believer in momentum at 3:55 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

LAKE PLACID, N.Y. — If you think that momentum can change a series, there is at least one thing that you and Claude Julien do not have in common.

Speaking Tuesday at Whiteface Lake Placid Olympic Center, the Bruins coach said he wasn’t concerned about the Habs grabbing momentum in the first two games at TD Garden more than he was about getting the team’s first win of the postseason. The victory finally came Monday in 4-2 fashion.

“The thing is, we felt that we needed to win yesterday,” Julien said. “We never talked about them having momentum, we just needed to play better. That’s the way I see it as well. Everybody might see it differently. I’m not a big guy about momentum more than it’s game per game. You’ve got to come back next game and realize that you’re still down 2-1 in the series. You have to be ready, because they will.”

The Bruins will return to the Bell Centre Thursday for Game 4.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien,
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines