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Video: Claude Julien, 10/14/10 10.14.10 at 8:19 pm ET
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Nathan Horton has three goals through two games, but what makes the feat more interesting is the fact that he took just five shots total between the two Prague contests. On Thursday, that stat was brought up to Claude Julien, who noted that if people look hard enough at the good, they can generally “find things that aren’t good enough.”

“If he can score three goals on every five shots, I’ll take it,” Julien said with a smile. “That’s my positive way of looking at it.”

Here’s the video of the Bruins coach’s session with the media on Thursday.

Read More: Claude Julien, Nathan Horton, Tim Thomas,
Julien offers updates on Savard, Sturm, Ference, and Seidenberg 10.13.10 at 12:51 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Bruins coach Claude Julien said after the team’s first practice since returning to the United States that the club is better off not putting unnecessary pressure on Marc Savard has he recovers from post-concussion syndrome symptoms. Savard has been unable to take the ice since failing his impact test when the team opened training camp in September.

“I’ve taken the approach that as long as he’s not with us, I’ve got to keep working with our group here,” Julien said. “I haven’t had any real good chances to talk with the medical staff and stuff like that, but he’s been working out, that much I know. It’s getting better every day, so I’m looking forward to seeing him on the ice, and we’ll take it from there.

“He’s behind by at least a month, a month and a half already, where we’ve been on the ice, so we have to be patient and give him a chance to come back. Right now I don’t think there’s any reason why we should push this guy to get back more than we should be helping him to get back. That’s the thing we have to make sure we do here, is give him due time to make that comeback, and when he’s ready to make it, we’ll help him through it.”

Julien also added that Marco Sturm, another long-term injury player (knee) is expected to begin skating in the coming days as he continues his recovery.

Both Dennis Seidenberg and Andrew Ference left the ice early on Wednesday. Julien said that while Seidenberg was dealing with either the flu or food poisoning, Ference was unable to shoot pucks due to a cortisone shot he received in his thumb. Julien noted that the veteran defenseman’s thumb ailment is “very, very minor” and that he won’t miss additional practice time due to it.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Claude Julien, Marc Savard,
Bruins introduce Jarvis, look toward future 08.04.10 at 6:11 pm ET
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During an impressive offseason in which the Bruins added much needed depth on the ice, the team has now found a new coach to help Claude Julien from up above. Doug Jarvis was introduced Wednesday as the new assistant coach, coming to Boston after lengthy stops in Montreal and Dallas.

The 55-year-old spent the past four years as an associate coach with the Canadiens, having coached alongside Julien during the 2005-06 campaign. Prior to that, he was with the Stars for 14 seasons, and had a fairly impressive playing career, winning four Stanley Cups with the Canadiens (’76, ’77, ’78 and ’79).

The opening for another assistant was created by the departure of Craig Ramsay, who left to become head coach in Atlanta.

When asked about the impact Jarvis will have on the team, Julien explained that the history the two share, as well as the long road he has taken to get here, will be instrumental with such a young team.

“When you talk to Doug Jarvis, he knows a lot about the game,” Julien explained via conference call Wednesday. “He’s played it for such a long time. Also, when you look back at how long he has coached, he’s been through a lot. He knows the different situations, how to deal with those, and you can see that. I’m one of those coaches that will see that first-hand.

“When I had him in Montreal I really enjoyed and really appreciated his loyalty, his dedication. Obviously, he’s one of those guys who will work hard and won’t be counting the hours as far as what needs to be done. People who are passionate are people who do that. Doug’s a very passionate person. He’s got a wealth of Stanley Cup championships as a player and as a coach. And that becomes valuable, especially when you’ve got a fairly young team.”

Jarvis echoed many of the same sentiments, sounding very excited to work in a new city with a young, promising organization.

“Well, certainly, having coached against [the Bruins], not last year but the two previous years, I have certainly seen a team that has great discipline and a lot of structure in it,” he said. “I have seen a team that in it’s development, a team that is on the move, and I think has established itself as a strong contender in pursuit of a Stanley Cup.

“In my playing days, obviously we go back to the late [1970s] there, the rivalry that has always existed between Montreal and Boston. For me, those years were special, in terms of playoffs and working towards the Stanley Cup. We’ve had some very memorable series, as we can all recall, particularly [1979], the seven-game series in the semifinal, and also I believe in [1977] when [Montreal] won the cup. All terrific series, all memorable times against a team and organization that I have a tremendous amount of respect for.”

Jarvis was out of the NHL last season but still followed the game closely. Asked what it will be like coaching from up in the box compared to the bench, he sounded very enthusiastic.

“Yeah, it will be a different perspective, one I am looking forward to when I heard what the role would be,” he added. “From up top it certainly means that keeping an eye on the game and making in-game adjustments that possibly have to be made; giving out information down to the bench. Other things that go along with that role will be pre-scouting the opposition in preparation for the game. I think doing a lot of the normal things coaches do. Whether it’s working with the players one-on-one with the video, those types of things.”

Jarvis added that he missed being close to the game, as well as having the opportunity to teach players the nuances of the game he picked up over the years. The Bruins seem to be an ideal opportunity for him to add to his already impressive resume.

Said Jarvis: “I consider it a real privilege to have the opportunity to join an organization with such a great hockey history and tradition as the Boston Bruins. I’m very much looking forward to becoming a part of the hockey staff in Boston.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Doug Jarvis,
Bruins name Doug Jarvis assistant coach at 3:25 pm ET
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The Bruins announced Wednesday that they have named Doug Jarvis as an assistant coach. The move rounds out a group that also consists of head coach Claude Julien as well as assistants Doug Houda and Geoff Ward. Craig Ramsay left the Bruins earlier in the offseason to become the head coach of the Atlanta Thrashers.

Jarvis most recently coached with the Canadiens from 2005 to 2009 and worked under Julien during the 2005-06 season. Prior to that, he served as a coach for the North Stars/Stars from 1988-2002. After leaving Dallas, he became head coach of the Hamilton Bulldogs (the Canadiens’ AHL affiliate) for two seasons.

As a player, Jarvis holds the current record for the longest games played streak with 964. He played 13 seasons in the NHL and won Stanley Cups with the Canadiens in each of his first four seasons. He totaled 403 points in his professional career.

Read More: Claude Julien, Doug Jarvis,
Bruins choose to skip Game 7 morning skate 05.14.10 at 11:43 am ET
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On the morning of the biggest game of the season, Bruins coach Claude Julien decided to let his players have the morning off as opposed to coming to TD Garden for a morning skate prior to Game 7 against the Flyers on Friday night. Julien said that since the Bruins had a late night in Philadelphia on Wednesday and practiced at Ristuccia Arena in Wilmington on Thursday, that it was appropriate to give his players the day to rest.

“First thing that I think you have to remember is that we had a late game the other night and didn’t get in until the morning. We practiced yesterday and did all the things that we needed to do to prepare for tonight. So, give our guys an opportunity to get some rest, simple as that,” Julien said. “We have done it before, sometimes in back-to-backs. Stay home and come to the rink. That was our idea behind this is that our guys need to rest and basically we have played these guys or we are going to play these guys seven times in a row. There is not much we don’t already know about the other team. So, come ready to play.”

It is the first time of the playoffs that the Bruins have completely skipped the morning skate through they have had optional skates and days off between games where only players receiving treatment have been required to report.

“Both teams are going to be reay,” Julien said. “Anytime you play a Game 7 where the winner moves on you have to be ready. For us it is a matter of not bogging them down with what has happened the last few games but focus on what we have to do tonight. The bottom line is, if you win tonight you move on and that is forgotten. But that is what we have got to do here is stay focused and stay prepared and I think that our guys are up to the task.”

As per usual, Julien declined to give any indication of what his roster would look like on Friday night but there was speculation after practice on Thursday that rookie center/forward Brad Marchand might get into the game after dressing in a grey practice sweater, normally reserved for the second line, as opposed to a red sweater that indicates the checking line and “fifth” line.

“Big players have to come up big in big games but at the same time I have also seen unsung heroes do that same thing,” Julien said in response to how Zdeno Chara could play on Friday. “In those kind of games you go in there and hope that somebody will make a difference and I don’t care if it is your best players or your role players. I just care that somebody comes up big and does something good for us and that is what you try to challenge your whole team to do. If you challenge only your key players then you are telling your other players you don’t care what they do. You want everybody to be difference makers, or go in with that intent anyway.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Game 7, Philadelphia Flyers,
Julien chooses not to discipline his team 05.13.10 at 4:27 am ET
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PHILADELPHIA — At least publicly, Bruins coach Claude Julien failed to lash out at his team for their 2-1 loss to the Flyers that has forced a seventh and deciding game in the series.

Nor did Julien take issue with Daniel Paille for an elbow penalty that the coach thought – at the very least – was questionable, leading to a Flyers 5-on-3 advantage in the second, and eventually a 4-on-3 power play goal for the Flyers.

“It’s important, but again not to criticize. It puts us down five on three when they called the elbow,” Julien said. “If you look at the replay he doesn’t even touch him. There’s a space between his arm and the guys face but he puts his head back and the [referee] calls it. Do you blame your players for that? I don’t think so, I think we have to stay on the puck.

“There’s no doubt about that, but I don’t know that we were overly undisciplined. We were the other night [Game 5] and it ended up costing us. Tonight, we had some power plays and we weren’t able to capitalize. We had some opportunities as well, a couple tough penalties, but other than that I thought we were pretty disciplined.”

Paille’s penalty was made even worse because Marc Savard was already serving a penalty. Then to finish the second period, Blake Wheeler takes an even worse penalty for holding with just under 27 seconds left in the period.

Can Julien sense tenseness in his players?

“It’s a situation where the winner of the game moves on,” the coach said. “Tonight, in the first three minutes of the game they really took it to us, but after that I thought we settled in and played hard. We didn’t probably get enough scoring chances although we had the puck in our end for quite a bit. In the third, we got more scoring chances and hit a few posts; the pucks just weren’t going in for us tonight. I’m not going to criticize my players’ effort.

“I thought we were ready, but somehow we have to find a way to score goals. They had about 30 blocked shots tonight so we shot about 61 shots at the net and 30 of them got blocked so they did a great job at fronting our shots. You have to give them credit for doing that.”

Milan Lucic did finally score in the final 60 seconds of the game, snapping a 134-minute drought for the team. Julien can only hope that momentum carries into Game 7 on home ice.

“It just gave us an opportunity to be in the game and you hope you can go get him a goal soon after,” Julien said of the Lucic goal. “Unfortunately, it was a little too late and we weren’t able to get that last one, but these are things that we’re going to have to find ways to score hopefully earlier and get more scoring chances earlier in the game instead of the third period tonight. If we can do what we did in the third, I think our chances are good.

“You really wish that line would get rewarded with some goals with the work they put in there. They work so hard, they make good things happen but unfortunately they haven’t been rewarded with the goals and that’s the unfortunate part. I guess everyone on the bench was routing for [Trent Whitfield] to score that goal because he’s been a good soldier for us, he’s been working hard and waiting for his turn to get in there and did a great job to spring himself loose. That would have been a big goal for us.”

Read More: Bruins, Claude Julien, Flyers, Mike Petraglia
B’s getting defensive about tonight 05.12.10 at 1:24 pm ET
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PHILADELPHIA — While Zdeno Chara wears the ‘C’ as captain, Mark Stuart’s return has been a steadying influence in the Bruins dressing room.

He missed the last two weeks of the regular season with an infection following surgery on his pinkie. And then he missed the opening round against Buffalo and the first three games against the Flyers. When he finally returned in Game 4 of this series against the Flyers, a quiet leader had returned to the Bruins dressing room.

That leadership was on full display on Wednesday morning when asked if he and his fellow defensemen need to get more offensive pressure on just-returning Flyers goalie Michael Leighton after getting just two shots on net in Monday’s 4-0 loss.

“Obviously, we want to get as many shots as we can,” Stuart said. “We didn’t do a great job of that last game. Tonight’s a new night here. If we can just forget about last game and quit talking about it and go play tonight.”

“Anybody who’s been out for a long time, it just doesn’t come back overnight,” Julien added. “What you need to see is a guy getting better and better and I think Mark was better in the second game than he was in the first and hopefully he’ll be better in the third than he was in the second so it’s like every player that comes back, you hope that they get better as they move on here.

“Mark, to me, was a much better player than he was in the first and hopefully, that continues.”

Just as obvious to the Bruins is the mission at hand tonight. They are hoping to avoid the pressure of a do-or-die Game 7 back in Boston on Friday night by beat the Philadelphia Flyers tonight at the Wachovia Center. The Bruins now lead the series, 3-2, after dropping the last two games while the Flyers have gained momentum with star Simon Gagne back in the lineup.

Stuart is not the only defenseman looking to pick up his game after not getting a shot on net. Matt Hunwick was also blanked on the shot chart.

“I think we just need to relax a little bit more and not hold the stick too tight and just play how we played the first three games,” Hunwick said. “We battled the first three games. They were tight, they were close but we found ways to win. I think we can look back on those efforts and we should do a little bit better tonight.”

As for the Bruins getting together for Kumbaya, Unbuntu or any other team-building the night before Game 6, Julien said there was no need.

“I don’t think there was anything special [Tuesday] night. We didn’t do a team dinner but I think our guys, in order to have success, we can’t be tense,” Julien said following this morning’s optional pre-game skate at the Wachovia Center. “Being relaxed is maybe not even the right word but in the right frame of mind and hopefully that’s what we show tonight when we start the game.”

The Flyers can become the first NHL team since 1976 to force a Game 7 after being down 3-0 with a win on home ice tonight and are looking to become the fourth major pro sports team to win a series after being in a 3-0 hole.

“We haven’t talked about it much,” admitted Flyers coach Peter Laviolette Wednesday. “Certainly everybody understands the difficult challenge that an 0-3 series presents. That’s part of the story you write through the course of the playoffs if you’re able to get through it, it’s part of the story. Our guys are well aware of it. Certainly they know not many teams get an opportunity at something like this. Any time you can put your name to a positive mark in history like that, it certainly would be a good thing.”

For the Flyers, head coach Peter Laviolette indicated that forward Claude Giroux would be ready for Game 6 after being held out of the third period on Monday after a hit to the boards from Steve Begin.

Read More: Bruins, Claude Julien, Flyers, Mark Stuart
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