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Nathan Horton won’t play hockey during lockout 09.21.12 at 10:28 am ET
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Nathan Horton

While Bruins players are quickly finding places to play during the lockout, at least one player won’t be going anywhere. Nathan Horton, who has been shut down in each of the last two seasons due to concussions but was cleared for contact over the summer, will not play hockey during the lockout, Horton’s agent told WEEI.com on Friday.

Agent Paul Krepelka said that Horton is “doing well” and that his decision to not play hockey during the lockout “has nothing to do with his health. Just his personal choice.”

Horton, 27, did not play again last season after suffering his second concussion in seven months in a 6-5 win over the Flyers on Jan. 22. In 46 games last season, the right wing scored 17 goals and added 15 assists for 32 points. Horton also saw his 2010-11 season end early when he suffered a concussion on a hit from Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals.

Horton had been in Florida this summer, but recently came back to Boston. He’s expected to stick around until things pick up with the NHL.

Thus far, David Krejci and Andrew Ference (Czech Extraliga) as well as Tyler Seguin (Swiss Elite League) have already made agreements to play overseas during the lockout. Dennis Seidenberg is expected to eventually go to Germany to play with his brother Yannic Seidenberg in the Deutsche Eishockey Liga.

Read More: David Krejci, Nathan Horton, Tyler Seguin,
David Krejci wants Tim Thomas to return to Bruins 09.10.12 at 1:57 pm ET
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David Krejci thinks it's too early for two-time Vezina-winner Tim Thomas to call it quits. (AP)

BOLTON — The Tim Thomas subject is a rather touchy one when it comes to the Bruins. He told them after the season he’d be taking the year off, leaving them with a potential salary cap burden. Furthermore, his exit paved the way for Tuukka Rask to get his chance as a starting goaltender, so Thomas’ (former?) teammates have often gone on record of respecting his decision to not play this year while pointing out that they are confident in what Rask will do with his opportunity.

Bruins players have danced around the subject of what might happen if Thomas were to return after next season, but when David Krejci brought up the subject Monday at the team’s golf tournament in Bolton, the center made his opinion clear: He wants Thomas back with the Bruins.

Asked what his reaction was when he heard about Thomas’ decision, here’s what Krejci said:

“I was in shock a little bit just like everybody else I guess, but you’ve got to respect his personal life. If he wants to take a year off, then he should do what he feels is right for him and his family. I respect that, but I hope he’s going to come back because he’s, in my opinion, I think he left — I hope he’s going to come back. If not, I think he left too early because he’s still one of the best goalies in the league. It would be bad for everybody, for the league, for the fans, for himself and for us if he wouldn’t [resume] his career. I haven’t talked to him this summer, so I don’t really have much to talk about.”

Read More: David Krejci, Tim Thomas,
Coyotes reportedly interested in David Krejci 07.18.12 at 11:53 am ET
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Elliotte Friedman’s “30 Thoughts” on CBC.ca is always worth reading, and Wednesday morning’s edition contains an interesting note regarding the Bruins and center David Krejci.

David Krejci had 62 points last season. (AP)

Wednesday’s post, his final one until next season, contains “bonus end-of-season thoughts.” The 35th thought is as follows:

35. Think the Coyotes, who are looking for offensive help, really like Boston’s David Krejci. I’m not as certain the Bruins are shopping Krejci, but they are loaded down the middle — especially as Tyler Seguin readies for an expanded role. That is probably where all the Keith Yandle rumours come from.

Krejci signed a three-year, $15.75 million deal last season that will begin in the coming season. His cap hit ($5.25 million) makes him Boston’s highest-paid forward. Last season, he had 23 goals and 39 assists for 62 points, good for third on the team behind Seguin (67) and Patrice Bergeron (64).

The interesting thing regarding Krejci’s presence in Boston is that it solidifies that Seguin, who was drafted as a center, will not have the opportunity to play the position full-time as long as Krejci’s around. Bergeron isn’t going anywhere and Chris Kelly and Gregory Campbell are both signed for the next three seasons — not that the Bruins would play Seguin on one of their bottom two lines anyway.

As an organization, the Bruins like having multiple guys who can take draws on a given line. Consider that Rich Peverley had also played plenty of center in his career before primarily playing wing on Kelly’s line in Boston. The second line is a similar case, as Bergeron centers a former full-time pivot in Seguin.

The 2010 No. 2 overall pick broke out last season with his 29-goal campaign, but there are still aspects of his game that could suggest he isn’t ready to make the move back to center quite yet. Seguin still has difficulty asserting himself when it comes to going into the corners, something that was often covered up by having a do-it-all center like Bergeron playing with him. Even so, if the Bruins were to trade Krejci, Seguin would likely be the logical replacement on the team’s top line given his offensive skill-set and success in the league despite being 20 years of age.

Read More: David Krejci, Tyler Seguin,
Looking back and ahead: David Krejci 05.01.12 at 1:43 pm ET
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With the Bruins’ season in the books, WEEI.com will take a look at each player on the roster one-by-one to provide some perspective on what went wrong this season and what the future holds for the 2011 champions.

David Krejci didn't do much in the playoffs. (AP)

David Krejci

2011-12 stats: 79 games played, 23 goals (career-high), 39, 61 points, minus-5

Contract status: Signed through 2014-15 ($5.25 million cap hit)

Looking back: Krejci has centered the Bruins’ top line for the majority of the last two season, spending most of his time skating with Milan Lucic and either Nathan Horton or Rich Peverley. Claude Julien played Tyler Seguin with Krejci and Lucic late in the regular season and for a portion of the playoffs. That made for a more offensively potent line, but defensively it was a risky line to have on the ice against other teams’ top-six forwards.

Production-wise, Krejci ran hot and cold, which wasn’t exactly a new development. He had an 11-game point-streak from Dec. 17-Jan 14 (five goals, 11 assists), but he also had long lulls in which he didn’t produce. Krejci managed just one point and a minus-6 rating in 11 games from Feb. 2-Feb. 24. He finished the regular season with a minus-5 rating. Only Shawn Thornton (minus-7) fared worse from a plus-minus standpoint.

Like Lucic, Krejci was one of the biggest goats of the postseason. He went without a point in the first four games, and though the managed three points (two goals, one assist) the rest of the way, he once again showed an inability to truly have an impact in the first round (in 14 quarterfinal games over the last two season, Krejci has just four points).

Looking ahead: The Bruins made sure to lock Krejci up during the regular season, giving him a three-year, $15.75 million deal. That makes him the Bruins’ highest-paid forward, so the team should be looking for more consistent regular-season production and better play early on in the playoffs.

Krejci has still yet to repeat his production from his career-best season in 2008-09 (22 goals, 51 assists for 73 points and a plus-37 rating). For $5.25 million a year, he should get back to producing at that level.

On breakup day, Krejci subtly hinted at frustration about being moved around in the lineup at points during the regular season. For a player making the kind of money he’s getting, that’s the wrong attitude. The right attitude would be to respond to demotions by performing his way out of it.

Read More: David Krejci, Milan Lucic,
Experience proves irrelevant for Bruins in first round of playoffs 04.26.12 at 2:14 am ET
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In the days leading up to the decisive Game 7 between the Bruins and Capitals, there was a plethora of talk about experience — mainly that the Bruins had it and were thus the favorites while the Capitals did not.

A quick look at the history books reflects that attitude. The Capitals were 1-3 in Game 7s since 2008 while the Bruins were 3-3, and the Bruins won all three of those Game 7s last season en route to their Stanley Cup championship. According to the history books, the Bruins had a better idea of how to win Game 7 than the Capitals did.

But even a cursory glance at the Bruins’ supposed experience revealed how much the Bruins were lacking in that area. In 2011, Nathan Horton had two of the Game 7 game-winning goals, and Patrice Bergeron had one. In 2012, Horton was not in the lineup, as he missed the playoffs with a concussion. Bergeron was limited in Game 7 by an undisclosed injury that prevented him from taking faceoffs and slowed him somewhat from the relatively healthy player he was in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals.

In the end, long-term experience did not benefit the Bruins, as they bowed out of the playoffs with a 2-1 overtime loss to the Capitals. Instead, it was more short-term experience, the experience gained from the other six games of the series and the games leading up to the playoffs, that provided a more accurate view of how Game 7 would go.

Throughout the series, the Capitals consistently beat the Bruins in blocked shots and faceoffs, small details that often reflect the strength of a team’s focus and desire. The Bruins outshot the Capitals, but the quality of each team’s scoring chances remained similar. Boston’s key players like David Krejci and Milan Lucic continued to be quiet while the load fell to players like Andrew Ference, who was 12th on the team in scoring during the regular season and the second-leading scorer in the postseason.

“At the end of the day when you look at your team, your team wasn’t playing its best hockey in this series,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “Before this day started, you just hoped that you would get through this Game 7 and pick some momentum up as you moved forward in the playoffs.”

The Capitals already had their momentum before the playoffs. Washington did not clinch a playoff spot until the penultimate game of the season, and it had to fight hard for every victory. The Capitals went 13-9 in their last 22 games of the regular season, and eight of those 22 games were decided in overtime or by a shootout while 16 of the 22 games were decided by two goals or less.

In contrast, the Bruins went 12-10 in their last 22 games. Four of those games were decided in overtime or by a shootout, equaling the total of overtime games in the first round series of the playoffs.

“We’ve felt like it was playoff hockey for the last 30 games to make sure we get in the playoffs,” Capitals forward Mike Knuble said. “It wasn’t like we had to throw on a switch and start playing again in the playoffs, start playing a different way.”

The Bruins did have to start playing differently in the playoffs. Like many teams, the Bruins rested key and injured players after clinching a berth in order to be fresh for the postseason.

The epitome of inexperience in the series was Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby, and he also proved that a lengthier resume does not always lead to success. With seven postseason starts, Holtby equaled the amount of starts he made during the season for the Capitals. Although the Bruins did not necessarily test him thoroughly, he still earned a .940 save percentage in the postseason, which was better than the very experienced Tim Thomas’s .923 save percentage.

“I was saying before we even came into the playoffs that it was good for this team to have a race to get into the playoffs,” Holtby said. “It really made us buckle down and not take things for granted, and that was a big thing.”

Now, perhaps because of that experience gained in the race to make the playoffs, it is the Capitals, not the Bruins, who have kept alive their hopes of winning the Stanley Cup.

Read More: Braden Holtby, David Krejci, Mike Knuble, Milan Lucic
Last chance: Bruins must expose Braden Holtby in Game 7 04.24.12 at 6:37 pm ET
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The Bruins have scored 14 goals against Capitals rookie Braden Holtby through the first six games of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals. (AP)

The Bruins have one more chance to get to Braden Holtby. If they do it, they should be able to advance to the Eastern Conference semifinals against either Ottawa, Florida or Philadelphia. If they don’t, they’ll be bounced in the first round for the first time in four years.

For the B’s, two of their three losses to Washington have been products of the team not being able to get clean looks against the Washington rookie. They’ve struggled to get legitimate shots by the shot-blocking Capitals and through to the net, so their bids either haven’t made it to Holtby, or he’s been able to see them perfectly.

In recent games, the Bruins have fared better. Though they dropped Game 5 at home, they got a goal on a rush (Dennis Seidenberg from Milan Lucic), a hard drive to the net (Brad Marchand) and missile from the point (Johnny Boychuk). In Game 6, the B’s put four pucks past Holtby, the last of which came on a rush in the form of Tyler Seguin’s game-winner.

“It definitely took us a while, but you’ve got to give it to him,” Marchand said of Holtby. “He’s been playing great hockey and making a lot of big saves, but we’re doing a pretty good job of getting bodies in front now and finding different ways to score on him. We’re going to have to try and do the same thing tomorrow.”

Holtby has had an impressive .935 save percentage in the series, but his numbers have been helped by the fact that he’s had performances such as Game 2 (43 saves) and Game 4 (44 saves) in which he faced a large total of shots but faced few legitimate scoring chances. Many of the shots Holtby stopped in those games came from outside the perimeter due to Washington’s excellent shot-blocking and overall defensive play.

Now, having seen enough of Holtby, the B’s hope they break through and have a high-scoring affair for once (no team has scored more than four goals in a game this series, and each game has been decided by one goal). One thing to watch is whether the B’s, if given the opportunity, take advantage of Holtby’s agressive style. In two overtime plays Sunday — Zdeno Chara‘s early bid and Seguin’s game-winner — the Bruins were careful to hold onto the puck until the last possible second in an attempt to get the goaltender to challenge them. It didn’t work for Chara, but Seguin kept Boston’s playoff chances alive by doing it.

David Krejci, who scored on the power play in Sunday’s Game 6 victory, agrees that the B’s have gotten progressively better looks against Holtby. Krejci was notably frustrated after Game 4 at his inability to produce, but he feels that he and the offense as a whole have worked harder to make the 22-year-old goalie’s job difficult.

“I think we had a tougher start, but the last couple of games, it was getting along,” Krejci said. “We’ve just got to keep it going. It’s a Game 7. We’ve all been there before, so we’ve just got to go out there, do our best and try to get a win.”

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Brad Marchand, Braden Holtby, David Krejci
Thoughts on the Bruins’ new lines 04.20.12 at 11:03 pm ET
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Should the Bruins put Jordan Caron in the lineup? (AP)

Claude Julien has changed his lines an uncharacteristic number of times this postseason, but his latest work is more drastic than perhaps any of the tinkering he’s done this season.

Out of the top six are Tyler Seguin and Brad Marchand. Seguin skated with the third line in Friday’s practice, while Brad Marchand was back to the Merlot Line with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton.

Marchand began last season on the fourth line before moving up to Patrice Bergeron‘s line mid-season and never looking back. After finishing second on the Bruins with 28 goals in the regular season, he’s been among the many B’s who have opened the postseason with rather uninspired play.

Here are what the lines were in Friday’s practice, according to reports:

Milan Lucic – David Krejci – Brian Rolston
Daniel Paille – Patrice Bergeron – Rich Peverley
Benoit Pouliot – Chris Kelly – Tyler Seguin/Jordan Caron
Brad Marchand – Gregory Campbell – Shawn Thornton

“Making line changes, that’s a part of trying to find solutions and it’s as simple as that,” Julien told reporters after Friday’s practice. “You’ve got to mix up guys who are not getting the results that we’d like to, so you’re trying to make changes that will maybe spark that part of our game.”

Here are some thoughts on the new lines for the Bruins:

- Not one line is the same as it was when the postseason began. The most radically changed trio is Bergeron’s, as Rich Peverley played only parts of the last two games with Bergeron, while Daniel Paille makes the jump from the fourth line.

- Julien obviously did this hoping that he can wake up some of his snoozing superstars. The top two lines in each game have gone scoreless thus far this series, as the team has had to rely on bottom-six forwards primarily for their scoring.

- While Seguin has been one of the Bruins’ worst players this postseason, taking him away from Bergeron is a risk. Seguin has underachieved in the past when playing on lower lines, but perhaps Chris Kelly and Benoit Pouliot — two of Boston’s better forwards this series — can get him going.

- The Bruins are deep enough that they can be tied in a series through four games despite the fact that their best forwards have been kept off the score sheet, but the Bruins really need to get something out of David Krejci. If Krejci repeats his first-round performance from last postseason (one assist), the B’s could be in trouble. Remember, he was having difficulty generating points against Carey Price in the first round a year ago. This is Braden Holtby, and the Bruins still haven’t consistently tested him for three periods.

- The Bruins should try to get Jordan Caron into the lineup, but for whom? As bad as Seguin was in the first three games before looking a little better on Thursday, scratching your regular-season leader in points should be out of the question. Caron brings a strong two-way game and had a stretch of eight points (four goals, four assists) in six games in March.

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Brad Marchand, David Krejci, Jordan Caron
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