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Bruins away from Boston roundup: David Krejci at home and scoring 10.18.12 at 2:42 pm ET
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Only 18 players were able to attend Thursday’s negotiating session between the NHLPA and the owners, due in large part to many of the stars being overseas for the lockout. Among those in attendance Thursday in Toronto was Bruins’ enforcer Shawn Thornton. A good day of talks between the sides could mean an eventual end to the lockout, but for now here’s the latest update on how Bruins players are faring in Europe and the OHL.

[Certain leagues’ stats take a little longer to surface on the various hockey statistics sites (HockeyDB is used for most of these), so some statistics might not be up to the day/hour/minute/etc.]

Swiss National League A

- Tyler Seguin has one goal and four assists for five points in seven games for EHC Biel. He’s also rocking a not-so-shiny minus-6 rating.

KHL

– In five games with Prague Lev, Zdeno Chara has one goal and two assists for three points and a minus-1 rating.

– Bruins backup goalie Anton Khudobin is 3-6-2 with a 2.65 goals-against average and .921 save percentage in 11 games for Moscow Oblast Atlant.

Czech Elite League

David Krejci has three goals and two assists for five points and an even rating in five games for HC Pardubice.

– In two games for Ceske Budejovice, Andrew Ference has one assist and a plus-2 rating.

Deutsche Eishockey League

Dennis Seidenberg has one assist and an even rating in four games for the Manheim Eagles.

SM-liiga

– Through seven games for JyP HT Jyvaskyla of the SM-liiga, Rich Peverley has no goals but five assists. He’s recorded six penalty minutes and has a plus-1 rating.

OHL

– Turns out it wasn’t just a hot start for 2011 third-rounder Anthony Camara. The physical forward has nine goals and three assists for 12 points and a plus-3 rating for the Barrie Colts. He’s also kept up his physical end of the bargain, compiling 21 penalty minutes.

– In 11 games for the Niagara IceDogs, Dougie Hamilton has three goals and eight assists for 11 points and a plus-11 rating.

– Goalie Malcolm Subban is 5-2-1 with a 2.08 goals-against average and .934 save percentage through eight games for the Belleville Bulls.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Anthony Camara, David Krejci, Rich Peverley
Report: David Krejci finally secures Czech deal 10.03.12 at 2:49 pm ET
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According to the Boston Herald, Bruins center David Krejci will finally sign with HC Pardubice of the Extra Liga in the Czech Republic. Insurance hangups had prevented Krejci from making a deal official in the weeks since he chose to sign with the team.

Krejci will play in the same league as Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference, who will join Ceske Budejovice this month.

Read More: Andrew Ference, David Krejci,
Nathan Horton won’t play hockey during lockout 09.21.12 at 10:28 am ET
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While Bruins players are quickly finding places to play during the lockout, at least one player won’t be going anywhere. Nathan Horton, who has been shut down in each of the last two seasons due to concussions but was cleared for contact over the summer, will not play hockey during the lockout, Horton’s agent told WEEI.com on Friday.

Agent Paul Krepelka said that Horton is “doing well” and that his decision to not play hockey during the lockout “has nothing to do with his health. Just his personal choice.”

Horton, 27, did not play again last season after suffering his second concussion in seven months in a 6-5 win over the Flyers on Jan. 22. In 46 games last season, the right wing scored 17 goals and added 15 assists for 32 points. Horton also saw his 2010-11 season end early when he suffered a concussion on a hit from Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals.

Horton had been in Florida this summer, but recently came back to Boston. He’s expected to stick around until things pick up with the NHL.

Thus far, David Krejci and Andrew Ference (Czech Extraliga) as well as Tyler Seguin (Swiss Elite League) have already made agreements to play overseas during the lockout. Dennis Seidenberg is expected to eventually go to Germany to play with his brother Yannic Seidenberg in the Deutsche Eishockey Liga.

Read More: David Krejci, Nathan Horton, Tyler Seguin,
David Krejci wants Tim Thomas to return to Bruins 09.10.12 at 1:57 pm ET
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BOLTON — The Tim Thomas subject is a rather touchy one when it comes to the Bruins. He told them after the season he’d be taking the year off, leaving them with a potential salary cap burden. Furthermore, his exit paved the way for Tuukka Rask to get his chance as a starting goaltender, so Thomas’ (former?) teammates have often gone on record of respecting his decision to not play this year while pointing out that they are confident in what Rask will do with his opportunity.

Bruins players have danced around the subject of what might happen if Thomas were to return after next season, but when David Krejci brought up the subject Monday at the team’s golf tournament in Bolton, the center made his opinion clear: He wants Thomas back with the Bruins.

Asked what his reaction was when he heard about Thomas’ decision, here’s what Krejci said:

“I was in shock a little bit just like everybody else I guess, but you’ve got to respect his personal life. If he wants to take a year off, then he should do what he feels is right for him and his family. I respect that, but I hope he’s going to come back because he’s, in my opinion, I think he left — I hope he’s going to come back. If not, I think he left too early because he’s still one of the best goalies in the league. It would be bad for everybody, for the league, for the fans, for himself and for us if he wouldn’t [resume] his career. I haven’t talked to him this summer, so I don’t really have much to talk about.”

Read More: David Krejci, Tim Thomas,
Coyotes reportedly interested in David Krejci 07.18.12 at 11:53 am ET
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Elliotte Friedman’s “30 Thoughts” on CBC.ca is always worth reading, and Wednesday morning’s edition contains an interesting note regarding the Bruins and center David Krejci.

Wednesday’s post, his final one until next season, contains “bonus end-of-season thoughts.” The 35th thought is as follows:

35. Think the Coyotes, who are looking for offensive help, really like Boston’s David Krejci. I’m not as certain the Bruins are shopping Krejci, but they are loaded down the middle — especially as Tyler Seguin readies for an expanded role. That is probably where all the Keith Yandle rumours come from.

Krejci signed a three-year, $15.75 million deal last season that will begin in the coming season. His cap hit ($5.25 million) makes him Boston’s highest-paid forward. Last season, he had 23 goals and 39 assists for 62 points, good for third on the team behind Seguin (67) and Patrice Bergeron (64).

The interesting thing regarding Krejci’s presence in Boston is that it solidifies that Seguin, who was drafted as a center, will not have the opportunity to play the position full-time as long as Krejci’s around. Bergeron isn’t going anywhere and Chris Kelly and Gregory Campbell are both signed for the next three seasons — not that the Bruins would play Seguin on one of their bottom two lines anyway.

As an organization, the Bruins like having multiple guys who can take draws on a given line. Consider that Rich Peverley had also played plenty of center in his career before primarily playing wing on Kelly’s line in Boston. The second line is a similar case, as Bergeron centers a former full-time pivot in Seguin.

The 2010 No. 2 overall pick broke out last season with his 29-goal campaign, but there are still aspects of his game that could suggest he isn’t ready to make the move back to center quite yet. Seguin still has difficulty asserting himself when it comes to going into the corners, something that was often covered up by having a do-it-all center like Bergeron playing with him. Even so, if the Bruins were to trade Krejci, Seguin would likely be the logical replacement on the team’s top line given his offensive skill-set and success in the league despite being 20 years of age.

Read More: David Krejci, Tyler Seguin,
Looking back and ahead: David Krejci 05.01.12 at 1:43 pm ET
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With the Bruins’ season in the books, WEEI.com will take a look at each player on the roster one-by-one to provide some perspective on what went wrong this season and what the future holds for the 2011 champions.

David Krejci

2011-12 stats: 79 games played, 23 goals (career-high), 39, 61 points, minus-5

Contract status: Signed through 2014-15 ($5.25 million cap hit)

Looking back: Krejci has centered the Bruins’ top line for the majority of the last two season, spending most of his time skating with Milan Lucic and either Nathan Horton or Rich Peverley. Claude Julien played Tyler Seguin with Krejci and Lucic late in the regular season and for a portion of the playoffs. That made for a more offensively potent line, but defensively it was a risky line to have on the ice against other teams’ top-six forwards.

Production-wise, Krejci ran hot and cold, which wasn’t exactly a new development. He had an 11-game point-streak from Dec. 17-Jan 14 (five goals, 11 assists), but he also had long lulls in which he didn’t produce. Krejci managed just one point and a minus-6 rating in 11 games from Feb. 2-Feb. 24. He finished the regular season with a minus-5 rating. Only Shawn Thornton (minus-7) fared worse from a plus-minus standpoint.

Like Lucic, Krejci was one of the biggest goats of the postseason. He went without a point in the first four games, and though the managed three points (two goals, one assist) the rest of the way, he once again showed an inability to truly have an impact in the first round (in 14 quarterfinal games over the last two season, Krejci has just four points).

Looking ahead: The Bruins made sure to lock Krejci up during the regular season, giving him a three-year, $15.75 million deal. That makes him the Bruins’ highest-paid forward, so the team should be looking for more consistent regular-season production and better play early on in the playoffs.

Krejci has still yet to repeat his production from his career-best season in 2008-09 (22 goals, 51 assists for 73 points and a plus-37 rating). For $5.25 million a year, he should get back to producing at that level.

On breakup day, Krejci subtly hinted at frustration about being moved around in the lineup at points during the regular season. For a player making the kind of money he’s getting, that’s the wrong attitude. The right attitude would be to respond to demotions by performing his way out of it.

Read More: David Krejci, Milan Lucic,
Experience proves irrelevant for Bruins in first round of playoffs 04.26.12 at 2:14 am ET
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brightcove.createExperiences();

In the days leading up to the decisive Game 7 between the Bruins and Capitals, there was a plethora of talk about experience — mainly that the Bruins had it and were thus the favorites while the Capitals did not.

A quick look at the history books reflects that attitude. The Capitals were 1-3 in Game 7s since 2008 while the Bruins were 3-3, and the Bruins won all three of those Game 7s last season en route to their Stanley Cup championship. According to the history books, the Bruins had a better idea of how to win Game 7 than the Capitals did.

But even a cursory glance at the Bruins’€™ supposed experience revealed how much the Bruins were lacking in that area. In 2011, Nathan Horton had two of the Game 7 game-winning goals, and Patrice Bergeron had one. In 2012, Horton was not in the lineup, as he missed the playoffs with a concussion. Bergeron was limited in Game 7 by an undisclosed injury that prevented him from taking faceoffs and slowed him somewhat from the relatively healthy player he was in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals.

In the end, long-term experience did not benefit the Bruins, as they bowed out of the playoffs with a 2-1 overtime loss to the Capitals. Instead, it was more short-term experience, the experience gained from the other six games of the series and the games leading up to the playoffs, that provided a more accurate view of how Game 7 would go.

Throughout the series, the Capitals consistently beat the Bruins in blocked shots and faceoffs, small details that often reflect the strength of a team’€™s focus and desire. The Bruins outshot the Capitals, but the quality of each team’€™s scoring chances remained similar. Boston’€™s key players like David Krejci and Milan Lucic continued to be quiet while the load fell to players like Andrew Ference, who was 12th on the team in scoring during the regular season and the second-leading scorer in the postseason.

‘€œAt the end of the day when you look at your team, your team wasn’€™t playing its best hockey in this series,’€ Bruins coach Claude Julien said. ‘€œBefore this day started, you just hoped that you would get through this Game 7 and pick some momentum up as you moved forward in the playoffs.’€

The Capitals already had their momentum before the playoffs. Washington did not clinch a playoff spot until the penultimate game of the season, and it had to fight hard for every victory. The Capitals went 13-9 in their last 22 games of the regular season, and eight of those 22 games were decided in overtime or by a shootout while 16 of the 22 games were decided by two goals or less.

In contrast, the Bruins went 12-10 in their last 22 games. Four of those games were decided in overtime or by a shootout, equaling the total of overtime games in the first round series of the playoffs.

‘€œWe’€™ve felt like it was playoff hockey for the last 30 games to make sure we get in the playoffs,’€ Capitals forward Mike Knuble said. ‘€œIt wasn’€™t like we had to throw on a switch and start playing again in the playoffs, start playing a different way.’€

The Bruins did have to start playing differently in the playoffs. Like many teams, the Bruins rested key and injured players after clinching a berth in order to be fresh for the postseason.

The epitome of inexperience in the series was Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby, and he also proved that a lengthier resume does not always lead to success. With seven postseason starts, Holtby equaled the amount of starts he made during the season for the Capitals. Although the Bruins did not necessarily test him thoroughly, he still earned a .940 save percentage in the postseason, which was better than the very experienced Tim Thomas‘€™s .923 save percentage.

‘€œI was saying before we even came into the playoffs that it was good for this team to have a race to get into the playoffs,’€ Holtby said. ‘€œIt really made us buckle down and not take things for granted, and that was a big thing.’€

Now, perhaps because of that experience gained in the race to make the playoffs, it is the Capitals, not the Bruins, who have kept alive their hopes of winning the Stanley Cup.

Read More: Braden Holtby, David Krejci, Mike Knuble, Milan Lucic
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