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David Krejci gets last laugh on the Flyers in Game 1 04.30.11 at 8:21 pm ET
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PHILADELPHIA — Maybe trash talking is all it took for David Krejci to rediscover his playoff mojo. That, and some really bad defense and goaltending.

While the Flyers were playing atrocious defense in front of Brian Boucher, they were also letting their big mouths do some talking, so said the Bruins forward, who got the scoring underway less than two minutes into Game 1 Saturday.

Krejci said the Flyers were reminding him that the last time he was in Philadelphia for a playoff game, he suffered an injury that changed the momentum of the series.

Krejci broke his wrist in Game 3 of the series last year, a game the Bruins won, 4-1. But Boston lost its top center – and momentum – as the Flyers came back to win four straight.

“The guys from the other team, they let me know in the first period about last year,” Krejci said. “But I tried to forget about those things. This is a new year, new season, new series. We have so many new players on our team. Half of the guys didn’t even experience it last year so we didn’t talk about it that much.

“This is a new season and we were just focused for tonight’s game.”

Krejci – who scored twice and added an assist in Saturday’s 7-3 romp over the Flyers- said he wasn’t thrown off by the comments.

“There was yapping back and forth, so they kind of let me know but you have stay focused and I think that’s what we did,” Krejci said.

But certainly the temptation is to think what might have been for all Bruins players, coaches, management, equipment personnel and anyone else who follows the spoked-B. If Krejci doesn’t take that hit at center ice, most believe the Bruins dispatch of the Flyers and it’s the B’s – not Philly – in the Cup finals against Chicago.

Was the thought in Krecji’s head and did it motivate him to come out and have a strong game in the opener?

‘€œI try not to think about what happened last year but it’€™s in the back of my head,” Krejci said. “You don’€™t forget these things that often but I try not to think about it almost at all. It’€™s hard but I just try to stay focused for the game and my teammates helped me out today.’€

The first shot Krejci took – the first shot any Bruin took – resulted in a goal on a shaken Boucher just 1:52 into the game.
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Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, David Krejci, NHL
David Krejci, Bruins beat Flyers in Game 1 at 5:54 pm ET
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PHILADELPHIA — The Bruins began the Eastern Conference semifinals on a positive note, chasing Flyers goaltender Brian Boucher in the second period and taking a 7-3 victory at Wells Fargo Center Saturday.

David Krejci and Brad Marchand each had a pair of goals, with Nathan Horton, Mark Recchi and Gregory Campbell picking up tallies for the Bruins. The first five of the Bruins’ goals came against Boucher, who was pulled at 17:14 of the second period after allowing Marchand’s first goal. The rookie winger picked up his second of the night by beating Sergei Bobrovsky at 14:59 of the third, and Campbell scored his first career playoff goal at 17:39.

Danny Briere, James van Riemsdyk and Mike Richards scored for the Flyers. Tim Thomas made 31 saves on the day.

The teams will play Game 2 in Philadelphia on Monday before heading to Boston to play Games 3 and 4.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

– Things sure are pretty when the first line gets first-line results. Krejci had just one point — his Game 3 goal — in the seven-game series vs. the Canadiens, and his four-point performance went a long way for the B’s Saturday. The B’s are still waiting to get more out of Milan Lucic, who did not have a point on the day, but his linemates certainly cashed in. Horton now leads the team with four postseason goals.

– The Flyers got some rough goaltending out of Boucher, and that’s obviously something the Bruins would welcome as a series-long trend. Boucher allowed five goals on 23 shots before being yanked, and some of the Bruins’ goals were very soft. Recchi got his own rebound before letting an easy one trickle underneath Boucher for Boston’s third goal, while Boucher knocked Horton’s goal into his own net while trying to stop it. Some goals, such as Krejci’s second, came as the result of traffic in front of the net, but it was just a bad showing for Boucher for the most part.

Saturday’s contest marked the fourth time in eight games this postseason that the Flyers have changed goalies during a game. Goaltending was an interesting topic before the series given that the B’s hold the clear advantage, so we’ll see if suspect Philadelphia netminding ends up playing a bigger role than we may have initially thought.

– The success continues for Patrice Bergeron. The second-line center was Boston’s best player in the conference quarterfinals vs. the Canadiens, and he had three assists on Saturday. The 25-year-old made a very nice play in redirecting an Andrew Ference shot from the point that would lead to Marchand’s goal off a rebound.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

– Pretty soon we’re going to have to change it to “What went wrong (aside from the power play not scoring) for the Bruins.” The B’s couldn’t bury one on any of their power plays, even when a shaky Boucher was in net for the first three. They finished 0-for-5 on the night and are now 0-for-26 in the playoffs. Yeesh.

– Sure, it was 5-1 at the time, but the Bruins allowed James van Riemsdyk’s second-period tally at a dicey time. Marchand had scored 16 seconds earlier to chase Boucher from the game, so the goalie change followed by the quick goal could have given Philadelphia a bit of a spark had they kept it up. Fortunately for the Bruins, they didn’t.

– Saturday marked only the second time since Game 2 of the first round that Chris Kelly’s line failed to produce a point. Peverley had a three shots on goal, but Ryder and Kelly combined for just one on the day. Kelly’s line was very good for the Bruins after the first couple games vs. Montreal, and the Bruins can only hope they get big production once again this round.

– The Bruins took four power plays in the first 13 minutes of the third period, and it finally paid off when Mike Richards ripped a wrist-shot past Thomas with just under seven minutes remaining in the contest. Sure, both teams in this series have bad power plays, but the B’s can’t assume the Flyers’ is as bad as theirs.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Danny Briere, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron
Bruins/Flyers Game 1 live blog: Gregory Campbell makes it 7-3 at 2:31 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia and others from Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia as the Bruins take on the Flyers in the Eastern Conference semifinals for the second time in as many years. The live blog begins at 2:30.

Bruins/Flyers Game 1 Live Blog

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Danny Briere, David Krejci, Gregory Campbell
Canadiens beat Bruins to force a Game 7 04.26.11 at 9:40 pm ET
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MONTREAL — The Canadiens have forced a seventh game of the Eastern Conference finals, as they took a 2-1 victory over the Bruins Tuesday night at the Bell Centre. Game 7 will be played Wednesday night in Boston.

With both Shawn Thornton (serving a too many men bench minor) and Dennis Seidenberg (Slashing) in the box, Micahel Cammalleri gave the Habs a 1-0 lead on a blast from the circle at at 10:07 of the first. Seidenberg would make it 1-1 just 48 seconds into the second period, though Brian Gionta would score on another two-man advantage at 5:48 to give the Habs the lead once again.

Milan Lucic was given a five-minute major and game misconduct in the second period for boarding Jaroslav Spacek. The Canadiens defenseman would remain bleeding on the ice for a few moments, though he did return to the game.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR BRUINS

– Once Lucic was tossed from the game, the Bruins didn’t get much from the top line. David Krejci and Nathan Horton combined for just one shot on goal (as many as Lucic had before being ejected), and it seemed Claude Julien was giving looks to multiple forwards in Lucic’s absence, including Michael Ryder, Brad Marchand and Daniel Paille. It was Paille who played with the line for much if the third period.

– It’s hard for a team to win when they are on the wrong end of two separate 5-on-3s. The Habs found themselves with a two-man advantage in both the first and second periods, and scored on both of them.

Denting the B’s chances at a comeback late in the third was a high stick called on Chris Kelly with 3:10 remaining in regulation. The penalty box, as it tends to be, was an enemy Boston’s Tuesday night.

– As great as Patrice Bergeron has been for the Bruins this series, Tuesday was not a night to remember for the B’s center. He negated an early B’s power play (not that it’s such a bad thing) by going off for goaltender interference late in the first. He also caused one of the two-man advantages by flipping the puck over the glass in Boston’s zone.

– While the Canadiens were able to take advantage of special teams, the B’s weren’t. Their power play looked especially dreadful in going 0-for-4 on the night. Through six games, they are now 0-for-19 in this series.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR BRUINS

– Nice play by Dennis Seidenberg early in the second period to step out from behind the net and beat Carey Price on a quasi-wraparound. The goal was his first of the postseason, but with the goal, he now has points in each game at the Bell Centre this series. He had one assist in both Game 3 and Game 4.

Rich Peverley came ready. The third-line winger led the team with five shots on goal and picked up an assist on Seidenberg’s tally in the second period. The 28-year-old now has four points ( 1 G, 3 A) in the last four games of the series.

– The Habs appeared to score the first goal early, as Tim Thomas had no idea where the puck was when it wad mere inches from his blocker. Gionta came flying in to whack it home, but an apparent earlier whistle negated the goal. The referees were more than generous with makeup calls going forward, so ultimately it didn’t pay off as much as it could have.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, David Krejci, Milan Lucic,
Bruins Game 5 Live Blog: B’s, Habs head to overtime 04.23.11 at 6:29 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia and others at the TD Garden for Game 5 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

<a href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” mce_href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” >WEEI.com Bruins Game 5 Live Blog</a>

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Canadiens, Carey Price
Milan Lucic and the postseason expectations of a 30-goal scorer 04.19.11 at 6:17 pm ET
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LAKE PLACID, N.Y. — The playoffs are a time when the top talent can take over a series. Teams know which guys to account for, and the big-time goal-scorers are at or near the top of the list of guys who can change a series.

When Milan Lucic scored 30 goals in the regular season, perhaps he entered that class of players expected to do big things in the postseason. Given that he also had nine points in each of the last two postseasons, Lucic also had high expectations for himself as the Eastern Conference quarterfinals began.

So far, Lucic is the only member of the Bruins’ top line without a goal in the playoffs, as David Krejci and Nathan Horton scored the B’s first two goals in Monday’s 4-2 victory in Game 3 at the Bell Centre.

Once a player reaches the 30-goal mark in the regular mark, does he suddenly feel a responsibility to be a reliable producer? Lucic said that everyone puts pressure on themselves come the postseason, but admitted Tuesday that this time around he does expect more of himself.

“For myself, I think the first two games, I put almost too much pressure on myself to go out there and score,” Lucic said Tuesday at Whiteface Lake Placid Olympic Center. “For myself, my game, if I just simplify it and just go out there and play and just focus on just straight lines and getting pucks in deep, everything tends to take care of itself.”

Lucic was a minus-1 in each of the series’ first two games. Things seemed to be getting worse Monday when he stole the puck from P.K. Subban in the neutral zone, but got barely anything on his shot on the breakaway that ensued. The Habs brought it down the ice after the play and got on the board thanks to Andrei Kostitsyn maneuvering around Zdeno Chara and beating Tim Thomas. Instead of potentially being 4-0, it was 3-1 and the crowd made its presence felt once again. Lucic’s play improved over the rest of the game, though, and given the way things seem to be trending with his linemates, coach Claude Julien hopes Lucic will begin seeing some statistical output.

“He was better last night. If his linemates are starting to roll, usually he follows up or vice versa,” Julien said. “When those guys start playing, usually the other guys catch up to them. I’m expecting him to get even better, and we’re going to need him to be better if he expect to win this series.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, David Krejci, Milan Lucic
Bruins win Game 3 in Zdeno Chara’s return 04.18.11 at 10:09 pm ET
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MONTREAL — It was far more of a nail-biter than the Bruins probably expected after jumping out to a 3-0 lead, but the B’s finally got their first win of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals, beating the Canadiens, 4-2, at the Bell Centre Monday night. The Canadiens lead the series, 2-1.

The Bruins got first-period goals from David Krejci and Nathan Horton, the second of which came in flukey fashion when Horton put it off the back of Habs goaltender Carey Price. Rich Peverley made it 3-0 off another lucky bounce 2:02 into the second, but the Canadiens came roaring back, with goals from Andrei Kostitstyn and Tomas Plekanec in the second and third periods, respectively.

Zdeno Chara made his return to the lineup after missing Game 2 due to illness, leading the team in time on ice and posting an even rating.

The Bruins will travel to Lake Placid for practice Tuesday and Wednesday before returning to Montreal for Thursday’s Game 4.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

– Not only did the Bruins score, but they scored four times. Not only did they score four times, but none of the goals came after they were already trailing by two goals. With the way the Habs came back in the third period period, the scoring the first two didn’t hold up, but the B’s can consider themselves on the right side of the fact that the team with the first goal has won all three games thus far.

– It wasn’t exactly the rope-a-dope game the Habs played in Games 1 and 2, but the Bruins did an excellent job of making sure pucks did not reach their intended destination through the first two periods. The B’s managed to get a stick on a ton of pucks in their own zone, breaking up plays and eliminating second and third chances.

– Peverley had a couple of big opportunities in the first period, so it seemed only a matter of time before he would be celebrating at Price’s expense. Peverley kept the puck on a 3-on-1 in the first but missed the net, and later in the period he intercepted an ill-advised clearing attempt by Price only to see a Habs stick whack it away on its way into the empty net. Peverley made good the third time around.

– Major kudos to the members of the Bruins’ fourth line. Gregory Campbell had two great chances in the first period, and he and Daniel Paille were instrumental in killing off two early penalties that the B’s took. Shawn Thornton nearly made it 4-2 in the third in one of the B’s rare scoring chances late in the game.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

– The Canadiens absolutely dominated the final 20 minutes of play. Keeping the Bell Centre crowd out of it for an entire game is one thing, but the B’s will need more of a 60-minute effort in Game 4.

– The Bruins did want they wanted to do on the scoreboard early, but two penalties in the first 7:27 probably wasn’t what Claude Julien had drawn up in the game plan. The B’s were whistled for too many men on the ice (a playoff favorite) at 1:08, perhaps due to just how loud it was as the fans were booing Chara. After killing off the early penalty, the B’s were once again short-handed when Krejci hooked Kostitsyn at 7:27. If it weren’t for the B’s getting their first lead of the series in between the two penalties, things would have looked grim momentum-wise.

– Speaking of Kostitsyn, it was a happy return for the Habs winger, and he got his revenge on the very man who kept him out of Saturday’s Game 2. Kostitsyn couldn’t play Saturday due to a foot injury suffered blocking a slap shot from Chara in Game 1, so being able to go around Chara for his first playoff tally must have felt a heck of a lot better than blocking that shot.

– While Kostitsyn’s second-period goal made it a 3-1 game, it could have very easily been 4-0 seconds earlier. Milan Lucic looked indifferent on a breakaway, making for an easy save for Price, and the Habs marching it down the ice put them on the board.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Carey Price, David Krejci, Nathan Horton
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