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David Krejci to wear Andrew Ference’s ‘A’ for Bruins 10.01.13 at 3:45 pm ET
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David Krejci will share the Bruins’ second ‘A’ with Chris Kelly this season, Claude Julien told reporters at the team’s practice in Vermont Tuesday.

Krejci gets the share of the distinction after Andrew Ference split it with Chris Kelly for the last two seasons. Ference was not brought back by the Bruins in the offseason, and he has since been named captain of the Oilers.

Originally taken by the B’s in the second round of the 2004 draft, Krejci has been the team’s first-line center for three seasons and has twice led the entire postseason in scoring. He did so in 2011 with 23 points and last postseason with 26 points.

In 424 career regular-season games, Krejci has 91 goals and 218 assists for 309 points. He is entering the second season of a three-year, $5.25 million contract.

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Chris Kelly, David Krejci,
Carl Soderberg ‘highly doubtful’ for Thursday’s season-opener at 3:23 pm ET
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Claude Julien told reporters at Tuesday’s practice in Vermont that forward Carl Soderberg is “highly doubtful” to play in Thursday’s season-opener with swelling in his ankle. Soderberg was listed as being on injured reserve when NHL’s opening-day rosters were released Tuesday.

Julien added that David Krejci, who also did not practice Tuesday, will skate Wednesday, making his status for Thursday a lot better than Soderberg’s.

With Soderberg likely out, expect Jordan Caron to play in his place as the third-line left wing.

Soderberg suffered the injury in the preseason finale Friday, when he hit a right in the Bruins’ exhibition against the Jets.

For more Bruins coverage, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Carl Soderberg, David Krejci,
Bruins waive Nick Johnson; David Krejci, Carl Soderberg ‘day-to-day’ 09.29.13 at 12:01 pm ET
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Both David Krejci and Carl Soderberg were absent from Bruins practice Sunday, with the B’s placing forward Nick Johnson on waivers just prior to the skate. The team made the move with the intention of sending Johnson to Providence, but he must clear waivers first.

Krejci missed Friday’s preseason finale with back spasms.

“Right now I would say they’re just day-to-day,” Claude Julien said after Sunday’s practice. “Maybe as we move further it might be better. To be honest with you, with Krej it might be better.

“With Carl, I’m not sure yet, because the injury was suffered when he hit a rut the other night. It’s still up in the air as far as the seriousness of it. We had first deemed it minor and now it’s questionable.”

Johnson being placed on waivers means that the team’s roster is more or less set. Jordan Caron will be the team’s 13th forward, while the team will keep eight defensemen (with Kevan Miller the eighth).

Assuming all players are healthy, the roster should look like this for opening night based on the players currently on the roster:

Milan LucicDavid Krejci – Jarome Iginla
Brad MarchandPatrice Bergeron – Loui Eriksson
Carl Soderberg – Chris Kelly – Reilly Smith
Daniel PailleGregory CampbellShawn Thornton

Zdeno CharaJohnny Boychuk
Dennis Seidenberg – Dougie Hamilton
Torey Krug – Adam McQuaid

Tuukka Rask
Chad Johnson

Healthy scratches: Jordan Caron, Matt Bartkowski, Kevan Miller

Read More: Carl Soderberg, David Krejci, Nick Johnson,
Takeaways from Bruins’ 3-2 win over Capitals: Power play strong again; Ryan Spooner impresses 09.23.13 at 9:55 pm ET
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Chris Kelly scored in overtime to give the Bruins a 3-2 win over the Capitals in their final home game of the preseason Monday night at TD Garden.

They’ll finish out the preseason later this week with a pair of games against the Jets before opening up the regular season at home next Thursday against the Lightning.

The Bruins iced the following lineup:

Lucic – Krejci – Iginla
Soderberg – Kelly – Smith
Caron – Spooner – Johnson
Paille – Lindblad – Thornton

Chara – Boychuk
Bartkowski – McQuaid
Seidenber – Miller

Here are some takeaways from the game:

– The Bruins got a power-play goal with who else but Zdeno Chara in front. Chara tipped a Dennis Seidenberg shot from from the point past Braden Holtby in the second period to tie the game at one. This is the power play the Bruins used and had been working on in practice earlier in the day:

Krejci – Seidenberg
Iginla – Lucic
Chara

The B’s also got a 5-on-3 goal from Chara at the point with Seidenberg, while Jarome Iginla was up front with David Krejci and Milan Lucic on the wings.

– There were quite a few fights, with Kevan Miller squaring off with Aaron Colpatti, Lucic and Johnny Boychuk dropping the gloves with Joel Rechlicz in separate fights. Additionally, Adam McQuaid and Dane Byers fought at the same time as Nick Johnson and Michal Cajkovsky in the third period.

Players can and do work on their technique in practice without having to land punches, so there isn’t much of a point in risking injury (or suspension if things get out of hand like they did in Toronto on Sunday night) during the preseason. Lots of fights = lots of unnecessary risk.

Ryan Spooner was one of the best players on the ice for the B’s as he continues to try to force the team to make a tough decision. The team isn’t interested in making him a wing, and they probably shouldn’t be given that Reilly Smith has had a strong camp, but Spooner could at the very least push to be the team’s extra forward. At the very least, Spooner is outperforming Jordan Caron, who entered camp as a favorite to earn the 13th forward spot.

– Smith looked good in the first period and was kind of underwhelming the rest of the way. He came out flying on his first shift and made a fool out of Connor Carrick in the offensive zone as he cycled the puck to himself, and in general the former Star seems to be everything that Caron is supposed to be. He’s good in his own end and tough to out-muscle, which is strange because he’s two inches shorter and more than 35 pounds lighter than Caron. Either way, Smith plays bigger than his body and is making a good case to keep that third-line right wing job. Smith was on the ice for both of Washington’s goals, however, with the first goal coming on Smith’s first PK shift of the night.

– The Bruins allowed just seven shots on goal through the first 53-plus minutes of the game, but two of them went past Tuukka Rask. The Caps could have scored on what would have been their eighth shot following a Krejci turnover in the third period, but Miller was able to break up the 2-on-1 bid before the Caps could get a shot on goal. The B’s outshot the Capitals, 37-12, in regulation.

– Speaking of Krejci and turnovers, he made some in the offensive zone in what certainly wasn’t his prettiest game. He’s also gotten rather drop-pass happy.

Read More: Chris Kelly, David Krejci, Jordan Caron, Reilly Smith
David Krejci, Jaromir Jagr invited to Czech Republic orientation camp 09.06.13 at 2:38 pm ET
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The orientation camp roster for the Czech Republic Olympic team was announced Friday, with Bruins center David Krejci and former B’s winger Jaromir Jagr among the names.

The two are part of a group of 67 candidates to represent the Czech Republic this winter in Sochi.

If he is to make the team, this would be Krejci’s second Olympics and Jagr’s fifth. Both players were a member of the 2010 team.

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: David Krejci, Jaromir Jagr,
Milan Lucic: ‘This is where players are remembered the most’ 06.24.13 at 2:14 pm ET
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Bruins players spoke to a jam-packed room of reporters in comically large media scrums after what might have been their last morning skate of the season. They answered their questions, sounded optimistic, but Milan Lucic sounded tired of his own words. He looked, pretty obviously, like a guy who just wanted to get back on the ice for Game 6.

After all, the Bruins know their situation: Win and it’s Game 7. Lose and it’s over.

“When you’re in a moment like this, there’s definitely nothing to save it for. You don’t come this far to lose, right?” Lucic said. “It would have been easy to quit two months ago in that Game 7 in Toronto to get ourselves through that game. There’s no reason why we can’t dig deep and find a little bit extra to get us through this one.”

Added Lucic: “This is where players are remembered the most. You’ve got to find it within you to do whatever you can. You never know when you’re going to be back in this situation, and you’ve got to make the most of the opportunity that’s given to you. Right now you’ve got to view this as an opportunity and try to do everything you can to force a Game 7.”

The Bruins came back against Toronto in the most unfathomable way possible. If they’re trailing by three goals midway through the third on Monday (or maybe Wednesday), you can bet that they’ll be toast. Still, the lesson in Toronto’s collapse is that anything is possible. Both teams will have the rosters they’ve had throughout the series (Patrice Bergeron and Jonathan Toews are in), so the Bruins don’t need to worry about anything but coming out of Game 6 with a win.

How might they do that? Getting better looks against Corey Crawford would be a start. The B’s outshot the Blackhawks in the early going of Game 5 (the Blackhawks held the overall edge at 32-25), but they didn’t pepper his glove side the way they did when they scored five against him in Game 4. Lucic says the B’s need to take whatever chances they can get.

In general the Bruins could stand to get more out of the top line of Lucic, David Krejci and Nathan Horton. Though they produced a goal in Game 5, the members of the line have yet to score since Lucic’s two-goal performance in Game 1.

Consider the circumstances of their most promising period in a while. The Bruins had the Blachawks on their heels at points in the third period and saw the Krejci line produce a goal, but they were able to do that with Jonathan Toews not in the game. The Krejci line scored against the Bickell – Kruger – Kane line on a Zdeno Chara blast, but given that the Blackhawks were mixing and matching without this season’s Selke winner, the Krejci line played against the Kane line and also Dave Bolland‘s line in the third. Still, you’ll take results either way, and though Chicago got that goal back on a Bolland empty-netter and sealed up Game 5, Krejci was encouraged by his line’s third period.

“I think we had a great third period,” Krejci said. “Maybe the best in the whole finals. We’ve got to try to build on that and bring it to tonight’s game from the first minute to the end.”

Krejci still leads all playoff skaters in a landslide with 25 points (the next guys have 19), but he has yet to go off in the finals like he has in series past — most notably, they could use some production like he had in the first round. After having 13 points (five goals, eight assists) against the Maple Leafs, Krejci has put up four points in each of the last three series: four assists against the Rangers in five games, four goals against the Penguins in four games, and four assists against the Blackhawks through four games.

If the Bruins are to push this to seven, more offensive output from their top line would go a long way.

“We need to do more. We’ve definitely talked about being better,” Lucic said. “We’ve been playing well throughout the whole playoffs, and we’ve talked about [how] there’s no reason we can’t bring our best in situations like this.”

Read More: David Krejci, Milan Lucic, Nathan Horton,
Pierre McGuire on M&M: Bruins ‘played with the heart of a champion’ 06.13.13 at 8:08 pm ET
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NBC hockey analyst Pierre McGuire joined Mut & Merloni on Thursday afternoon to discuss Wednesday’€™s Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals and the ramifications of the Bruins’€™ marathon loss going forward.

Sure, the 4-3, triple-overtime loss was disappointing, McGuire said, but the Bruins don’€™t have much reason to be down on themselves going into Saturday’€™s Game 2.

‘€œBoston played with the heart of a champion, and I don’€™t expect it to be anything different [the rest of the series]. It could be a long, hard series,’€ McGuire said. ‘€œI saw so many positive things from the Bruins. I saw a lot of positive things from the Blackhawks. These are the two best teams. There’€™s no Cinderella here. Both of these teams deserve to be in the Stanley Cup final.’€

What will be interesting is when the series shifts back to Boston for Game 3 Monday and the Bruins get the last line change before the game time. McGuire suspects Claude Julien will match up Patrice Bergeron‘€™s line with that of Jonathan Toews, and David Krejci‘€™s unit with Michal Handzus.

Speaking of Bergeron’€™s line, McGuire also said Tyler Seguin is a likely candidate to play with Krejci and Milan Lucic should Nathan Horton be unable to play. Horton left Game 1 during the first overtime and did not return.

McGuire also expects Seguin, who has five points (one goal, four assists) and is a minus-2 in 17 playoff games, to break out soon.

‘€œHe wants the puck. He wants to make a difference. His speed is very apparent, especially at ice level,’€ McGuire said. ‘€œFor those that weren’€™t at the morning skate [Wednesday], everything he shot went in. It was unbelievable watching him in practice. He was letter perfect with his passing and shooting. His skating is great. I just get the feeling he’€™s about the break out, I really do.”

McGuire gave much credit to goalies Tuukka Rask and Corey Crawford, even calling Crawford ‘€œsuperhuman’€ in the first overtime,’€ and said while Torey Krug‘€™s crucial, third-period turnover was quite unfortunate, the defenseman can bounce back, just as the Bruins can.

‘€œIt’€™s a tough situation for a young player, an undrafted player, to go into the Stanley Cup finals,’€ McGuire said. ‘€œIt was an egregious turnover. Obviously it ends up in the back of the net. Nobody wants to see that.

‘€œBut I thought he got better as the game went along. I know they weren’€™t afraid to use him in overtime, and he had some good chances. They used him on the power play, too, with [Dennis] Seidenberg. He’€™s a young player. He’€™s going to grow. I think he’€™ll be better off with the experience. Was it his best game? No. Was it a terrible game? No. He just made one bad mistake.”

To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page. For more Bruins news, visit the team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Claude Julien, David Krejci, Nathan Horton, Patrice Bergeron
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