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Don Sweeney on Sunday Skate: Bruins not limiting their search at trade deadline, ‘nothing that’s set in stone’ with David Pastrnak 02.08.15 at 12:46 pm ET
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Don Sweeney

Don Sweeney

Bruins assistant general manager Don Sweeney joined Sunday Skate to discuss the Bruins’€™ roster as the team gets closer to the March 2 trade deadline. To listen to the interview, click here.

The B’€™s have been looking for a wing nearly all season, though they are among a large number of teams who could stand to improve defensively. Sweeney said the Bruins continue to look for a wing, but that general manager Peter Chiarelli isn’€™t limiting his search.

“Everybody’€™s sort of focused on the fact that maybe our depth on the wings or scoring ability would be an area that we would like to address, having the types of players that we’€™ve lost over the last couple of years,” Sweeney said. “I don’€™t think it’€™s any trade secret that that’€™s probably the area that we’€™ve primarily been focused on, but I don’€™t think if any trade situations and discussions come up, that Peter wouldn’€™t have the opportunity to pursue in any one area that might strengthen our club.”

The search for a forward is part of an ongoing process to find David Krejci a permanent right wing. David Pastrnak’€™s play with Krejci was enough for the Bruins to burn the first year off his entry-level contract and keep him on the roster, though the B’€™s moved Pastrnak off Krejci’€™s line last week to keep the rookie away from other teams’€™ top lines.

Pastrnak was moved back to Krejci’€™s line with Milan Lucic in the second period of Saturday’€™s game, however, as the Bruins had last line change and were matching Patrice Bergeron‘€™s line against New York’€™s first line. Sweeney said Pastrnak remains a candidate to play with Krejci, but that the team is still figuring out what his role will ultimately be this season.

“There’€™s nothing that’€™s set in stone,” Sweeney said. “We’€™re just going to continue to evaluate. We’€™ll go to the trade deadline, and Peter’€™s trying to improve our hockey club. If we can do that, then David may find his way out of the lineup, may find his way back in Providence. It doesn’€™t matter. The boy has been a sponge with all things, and we’€™re so excited about his development trajectory and hopefully he doesn’€™t hit a wall here as he goes down the stretch.”

Sweeney did say that if either Pastrnak or Reilly Smith forces the Bruins’€™ hand and fills the spot themselves, it would be “the perfect scenario.”

The Bruins have around $2.2 million in cap space, though they have an undisclosed amount of unused long-term injured reserve space that will allow them to exceed the upper limit. Though they don’€™t have too much money to spend — something that can be helped by a trade partner retaining a player’€™s salary — Sweeney did say that the Bruins have the assets to add players to their liking.

“I think we have the assets to be able to pursue any type of deal outside of a straight cap add-on,” he said. “Obviously, the wiggle room we have from just adding a player without necessarily moving some money around is going to be more problematic than not, but from an organizational standpoint of having assets to be able to pursue deals and talk deals and potentially explore them, we absolutely are in a position to do that.

“Obviously, the cap dollars are what they are. We’€™ve been in the station all year long. We’€™ve managed that and we have to continue to do that down the stretch. Our cap situation doesn’€™t grow as the season goes along because we’€™re in LTI, but we do have some wiggle room.”  Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: David Pastrnak, Don Sweeney,
Pierre McGuire on MFB: Bruins need ‘proven’ veteran who can score goals 02.05.15 at 1:50 pm ET
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Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

NBC Sports NHL analyst Pierre McGuire made his weekly appearance Thursday on Middays with MFB after the Bruins’ loss to the Rangers Wednesday night, and to look ahead to their stretch of games before the trade deadline. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

With the trade deadline approaching, McGuire feels the Bruins’ biggest need is a veteran presence on the first line who can score goals, and play with Milan Lucic and David Krejci. He feels the defense can be corrected on its own.

“I don’t know about the top four [defenseman], it’s a fair question,” McGuire said. “I think it is more pressure and get more consistent offense in the first line and insert with [Milan] Lucic and [David] Krejci, and this isn’t a knock on whomever they have tried there — whether it’s [Loui] Eriksson or Reilly Smith, whenever it be anybody, David Pastrnak — it doesn’t matter. I think they really need a veteran presence, a proven guy that can score goals in a first line situation and then the rest of the batting order kind of stabilizes itself.

“I think they can do it by committee on defense really because of the way the team plays. I think they need to get more run support with consistency, I think that is one of the reasons why they play so many one goal games, they are in so many close games, they just don’t have consistent run support for their defense and their goalie.”

McGuire has been impressed with the rookie Pastrnak and compared him to Tyler Seguin in a way that he could make an impact in the postseason once he gets fully acclimated to the NHL.

“The one thing that stands out to me and not even being 19 years of age or pretty darn close to it, he can still dominate the puck,” said McGuire. “He made some pretty creative plays last night. It’s a hard league for kids that weigh 165-170 pounds to play in. I don’t see him tailing off. I think this will be a lot like what we saw with Tyler Seguin in the Bruins run to the Cup in [2011], just because it took awhile for Tyler to get comfortable and once he got comfortable you saw what he did in the Tampa Bay series in particular.

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Read More: David Krejci, David Pastrnak, Milan Lucic, Pierre McGuire
David Pastrnak’s first year burned off as his line comes down to earth 01.17.15 at 10:59 pm ET
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David Pastrnak

David Pastrnak

Forget the fact that the Bruins lost; did you notice that David Krejci‘€™s line with David Pastrnak and Milan Lucic didn’€™t even score on Saturday?

Given all of the attention that’€™s been placed on Pastrnak prior to the Bruins deciding to keep him and the success that the trio has had, the goose-egg from Boston’€™s trio actually is somewhat notable, really only because it’€™s the first time the line hasn’€™t been very good since being united.

Pastrnak, who has now officially accrued one season of service time in the eyes of the NHL and NHLPA (Saturday was 10th NHL game this season, which means this season is officially the first of his three-year entry level contract) and his linemates came down earth against the Blue Jackets, overpassing and losing the possession battle in Boston’€™s first regulation loss in 10 games.

“A lot of passing, a lot of missed passes,” Lucic said. “Maybe trying to do too much and didn’€™t play that north-south type of game that gave us success when we were put together originally.

“We have to know night-in, night-out as a line that in order to be successful and get results and contribute to the team, that there’€™s a certain way that we need to play. That’€™s a straight-ahead game and using our speed and obviously using our skill, but when we’€™re moving straight ahead and using all those things, that’€™s when we’€™re going to have success.”

The line nearly scored in the first period when David Krejci threw a puck on net from the top of the right circle that bounced off Pastrnak’€™s skates in front with half the net open. Pastrnak whiffed on his shot attempt as the puck glided to Blue Jackets netminder Curtis McElhinney. That stood as the line’€™s best chance, though Pastrnak did draw a penalty in the final minute of the period when he was tripped by Scott Hartnell.

But that was the extent of the good for the line offensively. Though Lucic tied for the team lead with five shots on goal, the Czech Davids combined for zero. Saturday was Pastrnak’€™s first game without a shot on goal since his NHL debut on Nov. 24.

Since coming up, Pastrnak has been a standout player. He’€™s found instant chemistry with Krejci, whose vision and creativity could make him a 30-goal scorer in future seasons. Yet there will be speed bumps along the way, such as when Pastrnak took a drop pass from Krejci entering the zone in the first period and, rather than shooting or finding Krejci again, forced a n0-look pass across the ice to Lucic that would have earned him an intentional grounding penalty in the NFL.

“That line didn’€™t do much for us tonight; nobody did as a matter of fact,” Julien said. “We need David to use his speed on the outside; we need Krech to make sure to use his speed on the outside and find him. If you’€™re going to be cute and try and overpass, you’€™re not going to get the results. That’€™s not how we’€™ve had success in the past. I don’€™t think that’€™s how we’€™re going to get success in the future.”

One telling takeaway that should bode well for this line’€™s future: In eight periods together, the Lucic-Krejci-Pastrnak trio has yet to get scored on. They have four goals for and none against.

Read More: David Krejci, David Pastrnak, Milan Lucic,
Bruins to keep David Pastrnak, burn off first year of entry level contract 01.15.15 at 7:57 pm ET
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David Pastrnak

David Pastrnak

Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli announced Thursday night that the team intends to keep rookie forward David Pastrnak on the NHL roster and play him for a 10th NHL game, at which point this season will officially become the first of the 18-year-old’€™s three-year entry level contract.

The Bruins can still send Pastrnak down and up between Providence and Boston going forward this season, as burning the first year one’€™s entry level does not require a team to keep the player on its NHL roster. The incentive for the Bruins to have not kept Pastrnak in the NHL for 10 games was that his three-year window would have slid ahead to begin next year, meaning he would be up for a new contract as a restricted free agent after the 2017-18 season rather than after the 2016-17 season, the latter of which will now be the case.

Chiarelli credited Pastrnak’s work with Providence both at the beginning of the season and following his November/December callup — which Chiarelli said was dominant — as a major reason as to why the Bruins felt he was ready for the NHL.

“He went down there and he did what we told him to do, which was play without the puck, play heavier, play on the wall, the defensive wall, offensive battles,” Chiarelli said. “Then he came up here and played in the West Coast trip and I think he got his feet wet a little bit, went back down and dominated down there again. I think in making this decision, we really scrutinized his play in Providence and we felt that he was able to play and excel at that level with the proper physicality for him and against the proper physicality.

“He’€™s going to be up here and we’€™re happy to make that decision and we’€™re going to continue to look at it as a development piece, which means that, as we’€™ve done before with some of the younger players, it doesn’€™t mean you’€™re in the lineup all the time. There may be points in time when his play dips a little bit and we may sit him down for a game or two here or there, but I think the important thing to take away from this is that he’€™s going to be up with the big team, practice with the team, and hopefully play on a regular basis.”

Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, in which Pastrnak remained on the Bruins’€™ first line with David Krejci and Milan Lucic and was a plus-1 in Boston’s victory, marked Pastrnak’s ninth NHL game.

In his brief NHL career, Pastrnak has four goals and one assist, with his goals coming in back-to-back two-goal performances Saturday and Tuesday. Pastrnak was first recalled on Nov. 23 and made his NHL debut the next night against Pittsburgh. The right wing stayed up with Boston for a six-game stretch in which he played five games and was a healthy scratch in another.

After the game, Krejci expressed excitement for both Pastrnak and himself, quipping, “I have a Czech buddy.” He won’t have a Czech roommate, however, as the Bruins will make other living arrangements for the 18-year-old. Teenage players often live with veteran players in their first years, as Patrice Bergeron did with Martin Lapointe and Dougie Hamilton did with Adam McQuaid.

Boston chose Pastrnak with the 25th overall pick of the first round last June and kept him in North America with the Providence Bruins rather than sending him back to Sweden, where he’€™d played the previous two seasons. After sending him down in December, the B’€™s loaned him to the Czech National Team for the World Junior Championships and sent him to Providence for a one-game pit stop before bringing him up to the NHL club on Jan. 6.

Pastrnak has been the youngest player at both the AHL and NHL levels this season. In 24 AHL games, Pastrnak has 10 goals and 17 assists for 27 points.

Read More: David Krejci, David Pastrnak, Peter Chiarelli,
Pierre McGuire on MFB: Bruins ‘unbelievably difficult team to play against’ at 2:05 pm ET
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Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

NBC Sports NHL analyst Pierre McGuire made his weekly appearance Thursday on Middays with MFB to discuss the Bruins’ recent hot streak and to talk about rookie forward David Pastrnak. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

The Bruins have won four games in a row and are starting to get into a nice rhythm. Even with their struggles early on, McGuire remained optimistic, so their turnaround isn’t much of a surprise to him.

“I really like the way the coaching staff has developed the roles for the players, so you’re seeing now [Carl] Soderberg evolve into the role I think they had envisioned for him,” McGuire said. “I think Gregory Campbell is getting into the role they envisioned for him. Daniel Paille same thing. Milan [Lucic] has really picked up the pace of his game physically. Getting [Zdeno] Chara back, he seems to be getting a little more comfortable with the timing issues that he might have had earlier. That helps you a lot. That puts players deeper on the depth chart in terms of minutes played, so I do.

“It is pretty much the way I envisioned this team. I still think it’s an unbelievably difficult team to play against. They are rounding into form.”

One of the players who has stepped up of late has been Pastrnak, as he has put up four goals in two games. He also thrived at the World Junior tournament earlier last month, scoring a goal and two assists in five games. McGuire says playing in that tournament can help a player prove he can play at the next level. He also doesn’t believe for a second the Bruins would send him down to Providence, thus keeping a year on his entry-level contract for playing less than 10 games in the NHL.

“I’ve been telling you about this player for a little while now, and when you can dominate a World Junior like he did and he is playing on a team from the Czech Republic that wasn’t very good and he was still dominant, that tells you he’s ready to play in the National Hockey League,” said McGuire. “I know that is a foreign concept for a lot of people to understand — I’ve been around that tournament for 20 years and I’ve watched the very best players come out of that and I’ve seen some kids that actually grew over the course of that tournament and that propelled them to being NHL players. That is one tournament, if you can dominant it best-on-best in your own peer group, you’re ready to play at the next level.

“I would be absolutely flabbergasted and shocked if he were set back [to Providence].”

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Read More: David Pastrnak, Dennis Seidenberg, Pierre McGuire,
Bruins prepare for surging Rangers at 12:00 pm ET
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After missing Wenesday’€™s practice, Brad Marchand took part in Thursday’€™s morning skate as the Bruins prepared to host the Rangers.

The left wing was back in his usual spot with Patrice Bergeron and Reilly Smith, while rookie David Pastrnak remained on Boston’€™s top line with David Krejci and Milan Lucic.

Thursday will be Pastrnak’s ninth NHL game, meaning it could be his last if the Bruins opt against burning the first year of his entry level contract. That would be silly, of course, but the Bruins have yet to announce their intentions to keep the offensively gifted 18-year-old.

Based on morning skate, Boston’€™s lineup for Thursday night is as follows:

Lucic-Krejci-Pastrnak
Marchand-Bergeron-Smith
Kelly-Soderberg-Eriksson
Paille-Campbell-Cunningham

Chara-Hamilton
Seidenberg-McQuaid
Krug-Miller

Rask

The Bruins, riding a season-best four-game winning streak, will face a red-hot Rangers team. Though the Rangers coming off a 3-0 loss to the Eastern Conference-leading Islanders, they have won 13 of their last 15 games and, with 52 points on the season, have as many points as the Bruins do with four games in hand. The B’€™s and Rangers both possess wild card spots in the Eastern Conference entering Thursday night’€™s game.

The Rangers will start backup goaltender Cam Talbot. The 27-year-old made 12 saves Tuesday night against the Islanders in a scoreless third period after entering in relief of Henrik Lundqvist.

Read More: Brad Marchand, David Pastrnak,
Bruins confident David Pastrnak can hold up defensively 01.14.15 at 6:11 pm ET
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David Pastrnak was a plus-4 on Tuesday. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

David Pastrnak was a plus-4 on Tuesday. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

With David Pastrnak, the Bruins’€™ first line will be able to score goals. The question is how many it will give up.

Given that Pastrnak, though clearly offensively gifted, is the youngest player in the NHL, it’€™s only fair to question how Krejci and Milan Lucic‘€™s line will do in the plus-minus department when playing against other teams’€™ top players. The line did not allow a goal in its first game together on Tuesday (really half a game, as they were united midway through the second), but it did score three. Claude Julien will take that any day of the week.

Yet the cautionary tale of the Tyler Seguin Experiment exists, as Pastrnak isn’€™t the first highly talented youngster to see time in the spot that has typically reserved for veteran power forwards (Nathan Horton, Jarome Iginla) over the years.

When Horton was out for the season with a concussion in March of 2012, Julien went for broke offensively by sticking the then-20-year-old Seguin with Lucic and Krejci. They produced at over a goal-per-game clip, but gave up 10 goals before Julien separated them. When the B’s were desperate for offense in Game 7 of the first round in 2013, Julien again put Seguin with Krejci and Lucic, only to see them allow goals on their first two shifts.

In case you haven’€™t noticed by now, Julien isn’€™t comfortable with lines that give up more goals than they score (insert then-why-does-he-ever-play-the-fourth-line quip here), so if he plays a trio together, he does so because he thinks it can do more good on the scoreboard than damage.

As such, it was interesting to see that, after the Lightning scored to make it a one-goal game Tuesday night, Julien kept Pastrnak with Krejci and Lucic for the top line’€™s next shift.

Or, put it this way: With the Bruins defending a one-goal lead in a game they had to win against the division leaders, Julien put the youngest player in the league — one whose defense seemed to be one of the things he’d need to improve in order to make the NHL —  on the ice against Steven Stamkos and the Bruins lived to tell about it.

“This is not a time to test guys,” Julien said Wednesday of his decision to play Pastrnak in such an important spot. “If he was out there, it was because I felt comfortable with him.”

Julien said that he considers such decisions with young players to be ‘€œcalculated chances.’€ He noted Pastrnak’€™s improvement getting pucks out along the wall in his defensive zone (Julien makes a good point; Pastrnak had some struggles there in his first five game stint with the B’€™s) and sound decision-making he’€™d seen from the rookie all night that made him confident that Pastrnak would not be defensive liability in the game’€™s most crucial minutes.

“I think for a player to develop, when you see the right things on certain nights, you’€™ve got to allow that player to have an opportunity,” he said. “That’€™s how you gain that kind of experience in those situations. Throughout the game, if you’€™ve seen situations where he’€™s kind of struggled and had some tough situations come up, you try to keep him away from that. It’€™s up to me to stay on top of the player and the game itself and see whether he’€™s earned it.”

Both Krejci and Lucic have given their endorsements to Pastrnak; it would be rather difficult to do given that he’€™s scored four goals over his last two games. Yet while Lucic acknowledged that the trio must stick to the team’€™s system to avoid suffering the same score-a-goal, allow-two-goals fate that they did in the Seguin days, Krejci said that Pastrnak, who hopes to become a strong two-way player like Krejci, will become better and better at applying his defensive learnings as he gains experience.

“It’€™s going to happen that we’€™re going to get scored on, that’€™s for sure, but we have to try to minimize the mistakes,” Krejci said. “On the other hand, he knows what to do defensively, but he has just been here a small amount of games and sometimes in a situation, he has to think twice of what do, and in that split second, something can go wrong. It will come with games played and I’€™m sure he’€™ll be fine.”

Read More: David Krejci, David Pastrnak, Milan Lucic,
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