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Dennis Seidenberg ‘pretty close,’ Brad Marchand expected to play vs. Rangers 01.22.13 at 11:51 am ET
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WILMINGTON — With the 0-2-0 Rangers waiting in New York, the Bruins on Tuesday returned to practice in anticipation of a rematch of the season-opener.

Dennis Seidenberg, who missed Monday’s 2-1 shootout win over the Jets with a lower-body injury, skated by himself prior to the session and participated in the full practice. With Seidenberg back at practice, his pairing with Dougie Hamilton was reunited, as was the Zdeno Chara-Johnny Boychuk duo. The Andrew Ference-Adam McQuaid pairing remained intact in Monday’s game and Tuesday’s practice.

Brad Marchand was the only absence, with Jay Pandolfo filling in for him on Patrice Bergeron‘s line. Lane MacDermid wore a Merlot jersey as the fourth member of Gregory Campbell‘s line.

Claude Julien said after the practice both Seidenberg and Marchand are day-to-day, though he expects Marchand to play Wednesday vs. the Rangers and said that Seidenberg is “pretty close.”

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Dennis Seidenberg out with lower-body injury 01.21.13 at 12:16 pm ET
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Bruins defenseman Dennis Seidenberg will not play in Monday’s matinee against the Jets due to a lower-body injury, according to the team. Aaron Johnson is in the lineup in his place. The team said Seidenberg is day-to-day.

Based on pre-game warmups, Dougie Hamilton, Seidenberg’s partner in the season-opener, will skate on a pairing with Zdeno Chara. The other pairings are Andrew Ference-Adam McQuaid and Johnson-Johnny Boychuk.

Claude Julien said prior to Monday’s matinee that it will be Tuukka Rask in net for the B’s. Rask, who inherited the No. 1 netminding job with Tim Thomas taking the year off, made 20 saves on 21 shots in the season-opening win over the Rangers Saturday.

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Claude Julien: Dougie Hamilton-Dennis Seidenberg pairing not ‘carved in stone’ 01.16.13 at 1:46 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Bruins rookie defenseman Dougie Hamilton has been paired with Dennis Seidenberg from the start of training camp, and with little time to mix and match in a shortened camp, it would appear that the two will be partners as the season opens this weekend.

Claude Julien did his best to pump the brakes on the buzz the pairing has created, saying Wednesday that while the two are partners for now, there’s still the possibility that Hamilton will play with another B’s blueliner in the coming days or weeks.

“You put those guys with the guys you know you can trust, but this is just a start,” Julien said. “I don’t want anybody thinking that it’s carved in stone that that’s his partner. You’re probably going to see throughout the year pairs moved around a little bit, but certainly he can benefit from the wisdom of those veteran players around him.”

Julien did say that he’s liked the job that Seidenberg, 31, has done helping the 19-year-old along.

“Any time a young player plays with a veteran you can gain a lot, especially if the veteran is a good veteran that will share his experience, his expertise with the player and help calm him down when maybe he gets running around a little bit or he gets uptight, whether it’s on the bench or on the ice. Coaches do a lot, but a teammate with some experience can do a lot as well.”

Though Hamilton and Seidenberg seem to be the pairing for now, it wouldn’t be crazy for the B’s to try to get some games out of the usually reserved-for-playoffs pairing of Seidenberg and Zdeno Chara early on. That would certainly be an easy way to prevent getting off to a slow start in the 48-game season.

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Dennis Seidenberg back from Germany after family-filled lockout 01.08.13 at 2:26 pm ET
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Dennis Seidenberg had a great time reuniting with his brother, Yannick, in Germany during the lockout. He’s just surprised he had to spend so much time there.

“It was nice to play with him for the last three months — longer than I expected — but it was a good time and a good experience being back with him on one team,” Seidenberg said Tuesday after joining a group of his teammates at Agganis Arena. “It was fun.”

Seidenberg, who arrived in Boston on Monday afternoon, played for the Mannheim Eagles of the Deutsche Eishockey Liga. Seidenberg’s younger brother, Yannick, has played for the Eagles since 2009-10 (all but 67 games of the 28-year-old’s 12-year career has been played in the DEL), while the Bruins’ defenseman spent parts of three seasons playing for the Eagles before coming to the NHL.

In 26 games for the Eagles during the lockout, Seidenberg had two goals and 18 assists for 20 points and a plus-15 rating. He didn’t play the heavy minutes he’s been accustomed to logging for the Bruins — Seidenberg averaged 24:02 of ice time per game last season — but he thinks that will be a good thing when the B’s really need him during the season.

“It started out slow. I wasn’t even on the power play for the first few games,” he said with a laugh before adding, “I’m not saying I’m an offensive player, but they [rotated] through six, seven, sometimes eight guys. It was good. You got your shifts in, you got your ice time, but you never really tired yourself out too much.”

Seidenberg said he was “crazy” as he sat in front of his laptop throughout the lockout awaiting its end. He was in town in November and was hoping he would only have to practice in Germany a couple more times before returning for good. That obviously didn’t happen, but the biggest letdown was when talks blew up between the two sides last month after player/owner-only meetings that had brought about an optimistic vibe.

“Like everyone else, in the middle of December, when they had the stretch of talks, a lot of guys thought to get ready, but that was a false alarm again,” Seidenberg said. “‘€¦ They finally worked it out and I think everyone’s excited.”

Though Yannick was sad to see him go, Dennis is obviously glad to be back in Boston. The 31-year-old didn’t like the lockout, but he’s happy with the experience he got out of it.

“I hadn’t been home [for an extended period] for seven years,” Seidenberg said. “Just being able to enjoy hanging out with people I hadn’t hung out with for a long time and playing for the team I started with was a good time.”

Now his attention is on the upcoming season. Seidenberg is happy he’s in shape, but even happier he’s in Boston and days away from competing in what should be a hectic season.

“I just drove by [TD Garden] this morning and I got a real good feeling in me when I passed the Garden, just imagining going back out on the ice in front of the fans and being able to play here again,” Seidenberg said. “I think everybody feels the same way and is excited to get going.”

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Players more educated, but no more confident after returning from New York 09.14.12 at 2:12 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Two-hundred-eighty-three players left this week’s NHLPA meetings in New York without any promising news about the start of the season, but they came away from the meetings a heck of a lot smarter.

It isn’t exactly easy to understand the nuts and bolts of the league’s labor dispute as the owners and NHLPA try to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement, so players who entered the meetings as confused as the next guy at least left them a bit educated.

“I was taking notes,” Tyler Seguin said on Friday. “Obviously there’s a lot of stuff I’m not going to understand. We do the meetings and obviously I’m not going to get into much detail, but then we split up into our teams and talk about it amongst ourselves and our questions. It was good. I learned a lot. Going into that, I don’t think I knew too much about HRR [hockey-related revenue] or anything like that and all the percentages and statistics, but I know a lot more about it now.”

Dennis Seidenberg said that while the meetings were beneficial given the unity the players showed and the things they learned, he doesn’t see any more reason for optimism now than he did before.

“The feeling is it hasn’t really changed much,” the defenseman said. “We were hoping that going to New York, we’d get some news in a positive way, but the main thing we did was get educated on what’s going on and what our proposal looks like and how we’re going forward from here. Other than that, not much has changed.”

Said Gregory Campbell: “I think it’s important to go to those meetings and definitely get the knowledge on what’s going on. As players, it’s really important to be informed. It’s one thing to hear it on the phone or hear it from somebody else, but to actually go there and really be informed — this is our livelihood, so we really have to make sure that we’re all on the same page.”

The owners are set to lock the players out at midnight on Saturday. A vote led by Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs yielded unanimous agreement for the move on Thursday.

“Going to New York was probably a good idea at this point in time, just because with this date looming, I guess it seems like the inevitable that there will be a lockout,” Campbell said. “We all have to be in the right frame of mind if and when this happens.”

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Dennis Seidenberg knows one person who wants a lockout at 1:07 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — There aren’t many people rooting for an NHL lockout, but Yannic Seidenberg is one of them.

Seidenberg, the younger brother of Bruins defenseman Dennis Seidenberg, plays left wing for Adler Mennheim of the Deutsche Eishockey Liga. His team has reached out to Dennis saying there’s a spot for him if he wants somewhere to play during the upcoming NHL lockout, and Dennis has indicated he would interested if it came to that.

“I was definitely happy that they were interested,” he said. “There’s an opportunity for me to go over once I decide to do that, but for now I’m just trying to hold tight and see where things are going.”

As if the team hasn’t pressed hard enough for him to go back to Germany to play, Yannic has been anxious to get his brother over there.

“Every day,” he said with a laugh. “He’s very excited. He keeps calling me every day and asking if I talked to them yet, to his team and got anything going, but I keep telling him I’m going to hold tight and see what’s going to happen here.”

Seidenberg spent the last lockout playing in the AHL for the Philadelphia Phantoms. While he doesn’t to see a work stoppage in the NHL, there’s a silver lining for him that doesn’t exist for most of the other players.

“The last time I played with him was like 10 or 11 years ago,” Seidenberg said of Yannic, “so it would be nice to get back there if you could take one positive out of this.”

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Bruins players discuss plans for potential NHL lockout 08.22.12 at 8:39 pm ET
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LOWELL — Several Bruins players weighed in on the NHL’s situation regarding the collective bargaining agreement prior to Milan Lucic‘s Rock & Jock softball game Wednesday night. Among the things discussed were their potential plans for the coming season in the event that there is a lockout. The current collective bargaining agreement is set to expire on Sept. 15.

Lucic hasn’t been able to attend any meetings thus far, but he said he has paid close attention to the negotiations between the league and the players’ association. Executives from the league and NHLPA, including league commissioner Gary Bettman and NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr, met in Toronto Wednesday, but got nowhere. The negotiations were cancelled before they began, and the two sides will meet again Thursday.

“Obviously there’s a lot of stuff that needs to be resolved,” Lucic said. “There’s a lot of issues that are being talked about and there’s a lot of things that from a player and a union standpoint, that we want and obviously from an owner’s standpoint, what they want. You’ve heard Don and Gary talk about it, that there’s still a wide gap between the two sides coming together. Like I said, hopefully it can get resolved sooner than later, but from a union standpoint and a player standpoint, we’re just trying to make sure we get a fair deal and have whatever’s right.”

Dennis Seidenberg played in the AHL during the 2004-05 lockout, but he hinted at playing in his native Germany next season if the NHL isn’t an option. One draw of playing in Germany would be the opportunity to play with his younger brother, Yannic, who is a forward for Adler Mannheim of the German Hockey League.

“Well, my brother plays in Germany, so it would be nice to play with him if it gets to that point,” Seidenberg said, “but for now I haven’t put enough thought into it to say what I’m going to do.”

Added Seidenberg: “It would be nice to play with him again, but I hope it’s not going to happen.”

Finland native Tuukka Rask said he also isn’t sure where he’d play, but did say it’s unlikely that he would play in Finland. Tim Thomas played in Finland during the 2004-05 lockout.

“I’m sure a lot of guys are thinking Russia and stuff like that, but I don’t think I’d go to Finland,” Rask said. “Maybe I’d try something new, because I played in Finland and I know what it is. Nothing against the league or anything, but maybe I’d try something else.”

Lucic said he knows he might have to consider alternative plans for next season, but he isn’t doing so yet.

“I’m still hopeful that there will be a season,” Lucic said. “‘€¦ I’m still hopeful that hockey will be played [in the NHL] this season, but that’s something that I’m going to have to think about and make a decision on at a later date.”

Another noteworthy bit of information from the players is that they still plan on having informal practices in early September, as they do each season.

“I’ve talked to a lot of guys on the team, and it seems like a lot of guys are coming back — especially the ones with kids going to school — as if everything’s going to plan,” Lucic said. “The CBA only lasts until September 15, so we don’t have much time even if we do start in Wilmington, but definitely for us guys that are on the Bruins and are here in Boston, we’ll definitely be skating together and doing whatever until whatever needs to be resolved.”

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