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Tony Amonte on M&M: Roberto Luongo ‘pumps his own tires enough’ 06.13.11 at 12:55 pm ET
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CSNNE Bruins analyst Tony Amonte spoke with the Mut & Merloni show Monday morning. To hear the interview, go the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

Amonte said the key to the Bruins winning Game 6 Monday night is to ‘€œride [Zdeno] Chara and [Dennis] Seidenberg.’€

‘€œI think that’€™s what they’€™ve done at home is been able to ride those two defensemen, their top D pair,’€ Amonte said. ‘€œThey don’€™t get scored on much, and they help you out, create a lot of offense for the Bruins.’€

Amonte said that a key to the offense is getting Tyler Seguin more minutes, especially on the power play.

‘€œSeguin’€™s a guy that could break the game open,’€ he said.

‘€œYou have to play the odds. You have to put a guy out there you know is going to score a little bit more than another guy.’€

While Gregory Campbell is good on faceoffs and penalty kills, Amonte said he lacks the puck control necessary to play in front of the net on power plays.

‘€œIf you can’€™t get control of the puck and you can’€™t get it set up, you’€™re never going to see a net-front guy,’€ Amonte said, adding: “That second unit just never had the ability to get the puck, settle it down, and establish a net-front presence.’€

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Gregory Campbell, NHL Stanley Cups
Barry Pederson on D&C: Bruins ‘let Vancouver off the hook’ at 9:34 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined the Dennis & Callahan show Monday morning to discuss the Stanley Cup finals. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

Pederson said he was surprised at the Bruins’ inability to match the Canucks’ intensity in Game 5 Friday night.

“Momentum has been funny this series,” Pederson said. “The Bruins had momentum going out to Vancouver and I thought let Vancouver off the hook. They didn’t make [Roberto] Luongo‘s life very difficult. They had four power plays, and all they needed was just even one to get some momentum. Vancouver, to me, was the far more desperate hockey club, outhitting and taking the play to the Bruins.”

Asked about Luongo’s comments regarding Tim Thomas, Pederson said Luongo may have been affected by all the pressure he faced going back to Vancouver and felt a little smug after posting a shutout following two routs in Boston.

“Tim Thomas has played spectacular this entire series, every game,” Pederson said. “Win, lose or draw, I think Tim Thomas is going to be your Conn Smythe winner anyway. To me, it was more of [Luongo] was just relieved they had won the game.”

Pederson talked about the Bruins’ matchups ‘€” specifically how they try to get defensemen Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg on the ice against the Canucks’ first line ‘€” and how it’s affected the attack.

“I think they work so hard at trying to get that, I think sometimes it takes away from your offense,” Pederson said. “If they’re able to win tonight, which I expect, then I would think maybe they may try to change things up a little bit [for Game 7] and maybe split Chara and Seidenberg so that one of two of those are on the ice every time.”

Pederson picked Milan Lucic as the key to the Bruins’ offensive success.

“I think that’s going to be the key for the Bruins, is attacking, five-man attack, get the forechecking game going and get the Garden crowd into this thing early on,” he said. “We said it all season long, obviously Thomas is the key in goal, but to me, the key person up front is Milan Lucic. He’s the key that sets the pace for this hockey club. He’s the guy that gets that puck dumped softly into the corner, making the defenseman turn around, and that’s defenseman knows ‘€” he can hear him coming ‘€” he knows it’s going to be a big hit. And as soon as that big hit happens, the Garden crowd goes crazy, momentum happens and the Bruins can get a team on the run.”

Read More: Barry Pederson, Dennis Seidenberg, Milan Lucic, Roberto Luongo
Green Men on D&C: ‘We’re two grown idiots in spandex’ 06.06.11 at 9:15 am ET
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Vancouver’s Green Men, Force and Sully, stopped by the WEEI studio for a visit with Dennis & Callahan Monday morning while in Boston for Games 3 and 4 of the Stanley Cup finals. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

The two Canucks fans clad in spandex bodysuits made a name for themselves by annoying opposing players in the penalty box at Rogers Arena, but the NHL restricted their behavior after they became cult favorites.

“The NHL directly told us: ‘No more handstands, you can’t touch the glass.’ We were told we were not allowed to agitate the players,” Sully explained. “So, we just have to step up our game and be more creative. It seems to be working. We’re getting under a few people’s skin.”

Diminutive Bruins forward Brad Marchand engaged in a feud with the pair last week. “Marchand gave us a couple of chirps, I got doused with some water,” Sully explained. “You get that when you ask if he’s sitting on phone books.”

Bruins defenseman Dennis Seidenberg, on the other hand, enjoyed the Green Men’s tribute to Bruins legend Cam Neely‘s acting career. “We had the Cam Neely ‘Sea Bass’ from ‘Dumb and Dumber’ reference ‘€” the trucker caps,” Force explained. “Seidenberg appreciated that. He said he’d pass that along to Cam Neely.”

Added Force: “I think Cam Neely upstairs is either laughing or wanting to fight us. I’m not sure.”

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Read More: Brad Marchand, Cam Neely, Dennis Seidenberg, Force
Dennis Seidenberg doesn’t feel disrespected by Dirk Nowitzki, hopes to be second German to win Cup 06.03.11 at 8:35 pm ET
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VANCOUVER ‘€“ The Bruins and Canucks were scoreless during Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals when an interesting video was played on the video board at Rogers Arena. It was Dallas Mavericks star Dirk Nowitzki, who had two messages, the first of which was ‘€œGo Canucks.’€ From there, he gave a shout-out to defenseman Christian Ehrhoff, whom he called ‘€œmy boy ‘€˜Hoff.’€

The connection was easy to make right off the bat. Both Nowitzki and Ehrhoff hail from Germany, and with both playing in the finals of their respective sports, it is an exciting time. Yet in endorsing one side of this matchup, Nowitzki may have slighted another German player in Bruins’€™ defenseman Dennis Seidenberg.

‘€œI talked to a German reporter, I talked to Dirk,’€ Seidenberg said Friday at the University of Vancouver. ‘€œThe Dallas Mavericks’€™ trainer is either a Vancouver fan or from Vancouver, I’m not sure. He always keeps him up to date, tells him stories. I guess that’s the reason he’s cheering for them.’€

If Nowitzki is a fan of German hockey players, he’€™s in a win-win scenario. Because both Ehrhoff and Seidenberg are in the series, one will become the second German player in NHL history to win the Stanley Cup. Prior to this series, only defenseman Uwe Krupp has won the Cup, which he did in 1996 as a member of the Avalanche. In that series, Krupp scored the Cup-clinching goal in triple overtime of Game 4 against the Panthers.

‘€œThere’s going to be a second German Stanley Cup champion after Uwe Krupp,’€ Ehrhoff said with a smile earlier this week. ‘€œThat’s definitely very special for German hockey. Hopefully it’s going to be me.’€

Ehrhoff and Seidenberg know both each other and Krupp very well. The two have played together on national teams since they were 17, and they were defensive partners in the Olympics last year under Krupp, the head coach of the national team.

Seidenberg said Krupp had wished him and Ehrhoff luck prior to the series. No. 44 has been perhaps the Bruins’€™ best defenseman throughout the playoffs, though it would take a lot for him to be able to top Krupp’€™s game-winner against John Vanbiesbrouck. Seidenberg remembers when Krupp became the first German player to win the Cup, even if he didn’€™t catch it live.

‘€œI was sleeping, but I watched it the next day, and I remember histshot from the point,’€ Seidenberg said with a laugh. ‘€œI remember the goal. It was pretty big back then, so it was exciting.’€

Though Ehrhoff and Seidenberg haven’€™t been in much contact with one another as they battle for the Stanley Cup, they are close with one another and have tried to see one another for dinner or coffee when their teams have met in past regular seasons.

‘€œWe’ve known each other since the Under-18 national team,’€ Ehrhoff said. ‘€œWe like each other, we understand each other well off the ice, but right now we’re not really talking. It has to wait until after.’€

Both players noted that there is a heightened interest in North American sports in Germany at the moment given that Nowitzki, Seidenberg and Ehrhoff all have a shot at a title. Ehrhoff said he’€™s spent plenty of time in interviews with radio stations back in Germany, and relatives of both defenseman have travelled or will travel to see it in person.

Either way, Germany will get its second Stanley Cup champion, but don’€™t expect either player to be happy with seeing the other guy do it.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Christian Ehrhoff, Dennis Seidenberg, Dirk Nowitzki
Dennis Seidenberg is looking forward to defending the Sedins 05.30.11 at 5:26 pm ET
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Dennis Seidenberg knows what the main assignment for him and Zdeno Chara is going to be in the Stanley Cup finals — contain Daniel and Henrik Sedin. It certainly isn’t going to be easy, but Seidenberg said he’s looking forward to the test.

“I love shutting down those guys, trying to at least,” Seidenberg said. “There’€™s nothing better than having a big challenge ahead of you.”

The Sedins can make their opponent look like a JV team with their ability to possess the puck for entire shifts at a time. They always know where the other is, and the two of them make no-look and indirect passes seem easy. Eventually, they wear their opponent down to the point where someone ends up open in a quality scoring area.

Seidenberg said the key in defending the Sedins is to not get caught chasing them around.

“You want to try to not be over-aggressive, because once you do that, they spin off of you,” Seidenberg said. “They’€™re really good at finding each other with the give-and-gos and the blind pass behind the back. So that’€™s a real challenge for us, to be aggressive without being stupid about it. We have to be smart in our defensive play.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Daniel Sedin, Dennis Seidenberg, Henrik Sedin
Bruins can’t close out Lightning despite David Krejci hat trick 05.25.11 at 10:46 pm ET
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TAMPA — The Bruins and Lightning are heading back to Boston to decide the Eastern Conference finals, as a hat trick from David Krejci was not enough to propel the B’s into the Stanley Cup Finals — instead, it was a 5-4 loss in Game 6 Wednesday night.

After the Bruins erased an early 1-0 Bolts lead with goals from Milan Lucic and Krejci. Tampa would come back with three unanswered goals before a back-and-forth third period left the B’s down by one following Krejci’s third goal.

Teddy Purcell did most of the Lightning’s damage to Tim Thomas, opening the scoring just 36 into the contest and giving Tampa a 3-2 lead 13:35 into the second period. Purcell now has six goals this postseason, three of which have come this round.

Thomas made 21 saves for the Bruins, while Dwayne Roloson stopped 15 of the Bruins’ 19 shots.

Game 7 will be played at TD Garden on Friday.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR BRUINS

– Another goal allowed very early for the Bruins. Krejci was set to take the face-off against Vincent Lecavalier and was tossed from the dot, allowing Lecavalier to go against Chris Kelly. The Tampa center won it cleanly, allowing for Purcell to blast one past Thomas. It was the Lightning’s second goal in the first minute of a game this series, and third goal in the first 1:09. Amazingly, it was the only game in the aforementioned three that the Lightning won.

– Yes, Eric Furlatt was officiating and the Lightning were penalized more than the B’s, but it was Tampa that won out when it came to actually capitalizing. The Bruins’ power play looked improved with Zdeno Chara in front, and Krejci scored his second of the game with the B’s on the man advantage in the third, but the Lightning went 3-for-4 as opposed to Boston’s 1-for-5.

– Once again, the Bruins simply couldn’t build momentum at St. Pete Times Forum. After blowing a 3-0 lead in Game 4, the B’s blew a 2-1 lead in the second and got no boost from Krejci’s goal that brought them within one in the third. Martin St. Louis scored 29 seconds after Krejci’s tally.

– Taking an interference penalty with 13:02 remaining in a game in which your team is trying to make a two-goal comeback probably isn’t what you want to do if you’re Tomas Kaberle. The polarizing defenseman did just that in the corner on a play that left Ryan Malone bloodied. Kaberle actually had a good night defensively, but the penalty won’t help his reputation around Boston as a bust of an acquisition.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

– Krejci’s hat trick gives him five goals in six Eastern Conference finals games. The dominance from the second round hasn’t been there, but the numbers have been.

– Say what you want about Lucic disappearing this postseason, but he always smells blood when his team has a chance of ending a series. Lucic had a pair of tallies in Game 4 against the Flyers in the second round last year, and had three goals in Games 6 and 7 combined against Philly last year. Taking Games 6 and 7 against the Habs this year into consideration, Lucic now has 6 goals in the last six games in which the Bruins could eliminate an opponent.

Dennis Seidenberg had a big play for the Bruins on a play in which the Lightning could have made it 4-2 late in the second. A Marc-Andre Bergeron shot yielded a rebound that Steven Stamkos tapped toward the net with Thomas out of position. Seidenberg literally put his foot down, stepping in front of the puck before it could hurt the B’s and starting a circus that landed Andrew Ference in the box for cross-checking Stamkos. The Lightning would score on the power play early in the second period on a goal from Stamkos, thus making the transaction a wash.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Andrew Ference, Chris Kelly, David Krejci
Bruins players: Canucks are only ones in Stanley Cup finals so far at 1:43 pm ET
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TAMPA — In case you haven’t heard, one team is in the Stanley Cup finals. After tying it with 14 seconds left in regulation and getting the game-winner in overtime from Kevin Bieksa, the Canucks have moved past the Sharks and into the the finals.

“I watched the tying goal and I was like ‘I’m going to bed,'” Dennis Seidenberg said Wednesday. “I went to bed, and this morning I watched the goal and was like, ‘Oh my God, that’s a tough one to lose on.'”

Of course, now the Bruins know that they have a team waiting for them. All they need is one more win vs. the Lightning before it becomes all about Vancouver and the Cup. They can close it out in Game 6 Wednesday night and send Boston into a frenzy. They were quick to note on the morning of the game that while they know that one team is in, they don’t know who else is.

“Obviously, you know that whoever goes through this series is going to play Vancouver, but at the same time, we don’t know who’s going through,” rookie forward Brad Marchand said. “If we start thinking that it’s us, then Tampa’s going to come back and take over control of the series. We have to make sure we don’t worry about that and just worry about our game.”

Shawn Thornton has been in this situation before. In fact, for the man who won a Cup with the Ducks in 2007 after sinking the Red Wings in the west for a spot in the finals, it’s comically similar.

“I was actually in the exact same position. I was in the press box watching Games 5 and 6,” Thornton, a healthy scratch since Game 3 this round, said Wednesday morning. “I remember. It was against Detroit, and it was the same type of thing. ‘€¦ Two good teams, and a tough series.”

Now that he’s once again one win from going back, the last thing he wants to talk about is the finals. In fact, he politely declined talking about the next round.

“I can’t speak for everybody, but my mentality is I never look past what’s going on here. If you start looking [ahead] and then you forget about what you’re [doing]. That’s not even in our heads. It shouldn’t be, anyways,” Thornton said. “We have to focus on Game 6 tonight, and that should be our only focus.”

One more win, and a very realistic possibility becomes even more real. The players aren’t trying to let the fact that a team and Cup awaits them, even if it’s a finals matchup some saw coming.

“I think the whole playoffs, we’ve kind of seen who could be possible opponents, and for me at the beginning, I thought it was Vancouver,” Seidenberg said. “They were one of the strongest teams, but at the end, it doesn’t really matter who it is. Right now, our main focus is on tonight and focusing on our game and making sure we’re gonna win tonight.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Dennis Seidenberg, Kevin Bieksa
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