Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Dennis Seidenberg’
Peter Chiarelli’s willingness to trade Maple Leafs pick makes things interesting 02.08.11 at 3:59 pm ET
By   |  5 Comments

Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli, making an appearance on Dale & Holley on Tuesday, fired the proverbial gun to kick off trade speculation with the NHL’s deadline just 20 days away. While he reiterated his preference to add a defenseman and potentially a forward, he shed light on the team’s financial situation as it moves toward the trade deadline (something he generally refers people to capgeek.com for), but that isn’t the real news. The GM said that, unlike last year, he is willing to put the Maple Leafs’ first-round pick, which has had “top five” written all over it for quite some time, in play.

“Yeah, I’d look at it, sure. I would,” Chiarelli said. “I’ve had discussions involving that pick. I certainly would look at it. We’ve got a lot of assets, so that alone allows us to be creative also, but I would look at it.”

Already having opened a big door, Michael Holley asked Chiarelli to elaborate on how Toronto’s first rounder, one of two received in the Phil Kessel deal in September of 2009, has come up in trade talks.

“There’s been one [deal] that we’ve thrown around here internally. I don’t know that I would do it, but it’s something that warrants further discussion,” Chiarelli said.

The fact that Chiarelli is willing to consider dealing the Maple Leafs’ selection ‘€” on pace to be fifth overall in a draft in which he admitted there being “uncertainty as to what the order of the top five is” ‘€” gives the Bruins a leg up on other contending teams. Sellers want top prospects or the ability to obtain top prospects, and the Bruins are the only team with two first-rounders this year, let alone a potential top five pick.

Plus, with Marc Savard being shut down and thus placed on long-term injury reserve, the team has cap space (seemingly enough to add a player with a cap hit in excess of $4.5 million without removing anyone from its own roster) to add a top player.

“Basically you can replace [Savard's] salary, that cap number,” Chiarelli said. “So that’s [$4 million] and a little bit of change [$4,007,143 to be exact]. We’ve got about $500,000 in cap space, so with Savard on LTI you have the ability to replace that player with a number of players up to an amount of $4 million. That’s not cap space, that’s actual salary. We’ve got some good flexibility right now.”

While the Bruins have been able to make deadline deals in recent seasons to land them major contributors including Dennis Seidenberg and Mark Recchi, the team has not made a blockbuster at the deadline since perhaps 2004, when the old regime gave up first and second round picks as well as Shaone Morrisonn for Sergei Gonchar. If the team is willing to see how far that Toronto pick can take them on the trade market, Chiarelli might be able to pull off something of similar magnitude.

While you can count out guys like Brad Richards (possessing a no-trade clause and playing on a third-place team in the West) or Jarome Iginla (no-trade clause and captain of a playoff team) the Bruins might not be kidding around when it comes to more realistic options. A top-five pick can go a long way, especially if it’s sent to a team that will need young stars to anchor a rebuilding effort.

This isn’t to say that Chiarelli will blindly toss the chip of all chips up for grabs blindly. It is, to borrow a term from the GM, an asset that franchises throughout the league would take considerable steps to acquire. And now, it seems an asset that could land the Bruins the major piece they’re hoping for without having to announce it at a podium in Minnesota.

Chiarelli said that he would “bet” the Bruins make a trade before the deadline. After Tuesday, how big a deal it is seems to be the only thing in question.

Read More: Dennis Seidenberg, Mark Recchi, Peter Chiarelli, Sergei Gonchar
Dennis Seidenberg has Bruins leading Sabres after one 01.20.11 at 7:44 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Dennis Seidenberg scored his fourth goal of the year when he sent a shot from the point past a Nathan Horton screen and Sabres netminder Ryan Miller. After one, the B’s have a 1-0 lead.

The B’s have 13 shots on net, with Tuukka Rask stopping all 11 shots he saw in the period.

Steven Kampfer drew the game’s first penalty when he hooked Thomas Vanek as the winger came around the net and sent a pass to Jason Pominville, who was promptly robbed by Rask.

With Kampfer in the box, David Krejci made a sharp move to keep the puck in the zone on a shorthanded bit. He sent it a few feet up Blake Wheeler, who was promptly tripped by Marc-Andre Gragnani, who was called up to take the place of the Drew Stafford (groin) in the lineup.

Vanek and Milan Lucic would add penalties for slashing and tripping, respectively, with each team going 0-for-2 in the period. The Bruins’ best opportunity on the power play came when, with Vanek in the box, a puck bound in front of the net to Horton with Miller out of position. Rather than taking the easy shot, Horton looked for Michael Ryder, and the play disintegrated.

Read More: 120 Sabres, Dennis Seidenberg,
Goals from Dennis Seidenberg, Michael Ryder have B’s tied with Penguins through two 01.15.11 at 2:34 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

The Bruins provided proof that plenty can happen in a short period of time, as they scored two goals in 13 seconds and enter the third period tied, 2-2, with the Penguins.

After Pascal Dupuis scored on generous bounce off the end boards, the Bruins found themselves trailing by a pair of goals. Dennis Seidenberg got them on the board with a blast from the point at 11:28, while Michael Ryder fired a wrist shot past Marc-Andre Fleury to tie it at 11:41.

Steven Kampfer left the game after getting hit in thecae by the stick of Dupuis. Zdeno Chara appeared to influence Dupuis’ stick on the play, and Kampfer left a small puddle of blood on the ice. Dupuis was given a double-minor, though the B’s failed to capitalize. They are 0-for-4 on the power play so far.

Through two periods, the Bruins are outshooting the Penguins, 26-25.

Read More: Dennis Seidenberg, Michael Ryder,
Bruins lead Sabres, 4-3, after one 01.01.11 at 8:13 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Tuukka Rask probably wasn’t planning on allowing three goals in the first period, but he’s got a 4-3 lead to play with as the Bruins and Sabres enter the second period.

Just 1:29 into the contest, Marc Savard won a face-off to set up an Andrew Ference goal from the point. After Ference’s streak of 99 games without a goal ended last month, the blueliner saw to it that there would only be five games between occurrences of him scoring.

Jason Pominville got the Sabres on the board shortly after, though Dennis Seidenberg and Brad Marchand would add goals for the Bruins to make it 3-1 just over five minutes into the game.

With the Sabres on a 2-on-1, Thomas Vanek appared to trip Ference when going for the puck, but when no penalty was called, Vanek beat Rask to make it a 3-2 game. To make matters worse, Savard was called for a questionable slash four seconds later.

The penalty would prove to be a blessing in disguise. With the B’s on the penalty kill. Mark Recchi got the puck up to Patrice Bergeron to create a 2-on-1, and Bergeron slid it across to Zdeno Chara, who put sent it past Ryan Miller for a shorthanded goal. It was Chara’s first goal in 24 games.

With less than a minute remaining in the period, Rask was unable to hold onto a puck long enough to get a whistle, and Drew Stafford knocked it in to make it 4-3.

The Sabres have outshot the Bruins, 16-11.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Brad Marchand, Dennis Seidenberg, Tuukka Rask
That’s what Christmas means to Zee: A look at European Bruins’ traditions 12.24.10 at 6:10 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

The Bruins gave fans an early Christmas with a statement-making win on Thursday, but when it comes to the Black and Gold, there’s plenty about Christmas that the average Bostonian doesn’t know. David Krejci, Zdeno Chara, Tuukka Rask, and Dennis Seidenberg spoke to WEEI.com about what Christmas is like in their native countries.

Here’s a look at each player’s customs and holiday memories:

DAVID KREJCI: STERNBERK, CZECH REPUBLIC

Santa who? Jezisek (pronounced “eshishik”) is the man, er, boy for the job back home for Krejci. Czech for “Child Jesus,” Jezisek is a child who delivers gifts to families, much like St. Nick would in these parts.

As is the case in Europe, Krejci’s family is all done with sharing gifts by the time the 25th rolls around.

“We have dinner on the 24th, and right after, we open gifts, so Christmas is the 24th,” Krejci said.

Given his years in juniors and now in the NHL, Krejci, like his European teammates doesn’t get to celebrate Christmas back home.

“It’s been a long time since the last time I was back home for Christmas,” Krejci said. “I guess I’m used to it. It still sucks that you’re not with your family, but I’m getting older and it’s been a long time, so I guess I’m getting used to it now.”

Teammate Tyler Seguin, like many North American kids in the ’90′s, remembers asking for Power Rangers toys and all things Barney. Over in Sternberk, then a part of Czechoslovakia, Krejci couldn’t think of anything but his future career.

“When I was growing up I always wanted skates, hockey sticks, and all the cool stuff that was really expensive that I couldn’t afford,” Krejci said. “So I asked my parents. I never got it, but I was excited for it anyways.”

TUUKKA RASK: SAVONLINNA, FINLAND

What do Rask and Santa Claus share in common? Nothing, besides the fact that they hail from the same land.

“Santa Claus is Finnish,” the 23-year-old goaltender told a now-enlightened WEEI.com. It’s a fact that can be confirmed here.

Aside from that interesting tidbit and opening presents on the 24th (“That’s the only thing I’ve known, ever since growing up”), Rask doesn’t think his time on Christmas as a child is too dissimilar from that of an American.

“The food is different,” Rask, who remembers meals of ham, salmon, and bread, said. “I think every family has their different traditions, but to stay at home and be with the family, that’s the same everywhere.”

DENNIS SEIDENBERG: VILLINGEN-SCHWENNINGEN, WEST GERMANY

The biggest difference that Seidenberg notices between the States and West Germany around the holidays is level to which it’s taken.

“It feels like there’s a lot more toys under the Christmas tree here,” said a smiling Seidenberg. “It’s just a lot more done-up, it seems, than in Europe.”

A traditional Christmas meal is also different from in the USA, and from the countries of his European teammates.

“We eat a lot of duck with cabbage, mashed potatoes, and stuff like that,” Seidenberg said.

The Bruins will practice on Sunday, which probably wouldn’t take place over in West Germany. After eating and opening presents on the 24th, they get the 25th and 26th off as Christmas holidays.

ZDENO CHARA: TRENCIN, SLOVAKIA

While Krejci had Jezisek and Rask had Santa Claus, the Bruins’ captain grew up with both.

“One thing we have is Santa — that’s ‘Mikalas’ — and then whoever brings the presents is Jezisek,” Chara said.

Chara shares Rask’s logic that despite the differences between the countries, there’s no cultural differences (hey, remember those? Those were funny!) when it comes to the most important part of the holidays: family.

“It’s pretty much the same as over here,” Chara said. “We all get together, the families gather together and want to spend it together. We have a nice dinner, and in Europe we open the presents on the 24th at night.

“As far as everything else, it’s almost the same. We have different food traditions for dinners. You guys have different over here, but I think the atmosphere around Christmas is pretty much the same.”

Happy holidays from the Big Bad Blog and WEEI.com.

Read More: Christmas, David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg, Tuukka Rask
Dennis Seidenberg on Marco Sturm: ‘He agreed to waive’ no-trade 12.02.10 at 11:38 pm ET
By   |  2 Comments

Life in the NHL – or any sport for that matter – can be unsettling. Just ask Marco Sturm, or his Bruins teammate and fellow German countryman Dennis Seidenberg.

Just hours after multiple media reports had Bruins forward Marco Sturm waiving his no-trade clause and being traded to the Los Angeles Kings, the Bruins made a formal effort to put the brakes on the story. Immediately following Thursday’s win over Tampa, the team – through GM Peter Chiarelli – released a statement on the report that they had traded Sturm to the Los Angeles Kings.

“I am aware of the various media reports today regarding Marco Sturm,” said Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli. “I can confirm that I spoke to Marco about waiving his no trade clause and have had discussions regarding Marco with other teams. I can also confirm that there is no trade in place with Marco. At this time, Marco is a member of the Boston Bruins and will continue to train with our team.”

Seidenberg said he spoke with Sturm earlier in the day and said Sturm confirmed to him that he had waived the no-trade. Now, Seidenberg and the rest of the team await the next move as Sturm’s future with the team appears in limbo.

“It is very tough, everybody loves Marco here,” Seidenberg said following the 8-1 thrashing of the Lightning. “He’s been a big part of our organization and he’s a great guy and I think any time you see a guy leave, especially in an awkward situation right now, it’s just tough.”

Seidenberg said he spoke to Sturm before Thursday’s game and he was under the impression that Sturm had already accepted the deal to L.A.

“He told me he agreed to waive it,” Seidenberg said. “I don’t know what’s going on. I haven’t talked to him since.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Los Angeles Kings, Marco Sturm
Bruins lead Lightning, 2-0, after one at 7:46 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

It may be Marc Savard‘s season debut, but after a period, the Bruins have another center and a wacky play to thank for their 2-0 lead over the Lightning.

David Krejci took a pass from Milan Lucic at the blue line, flew past a defender and fired a wrist shot past Lightning goaltender Mike Smith at 10:52. It was his third goal of the season and first since Oct. 30. Dennis Seidenberg puked up first goal tally of the season thanks to a lazy shot gone awry from center ice. Smith misplayed the puck to allow the odd goal with 20 seconds left in the period.

Tim Thomas kept up the impressive play that shut out the Flyers a night earlier, as he stopped all 15 of the Lightning’s shots in the first period. He did allow Tampa Bay an opportunity on a big rebound when he was out of position, but Steven Stamkos‘ line was unable to capitalize on it.

Savard got a standing ovation when he took his first shift of the night, and was once again recognized on the jumbotron during a timeout.

Both teams are 0-for-1 on the power play. The Lightning are outshooting the B’s, 15-9.

Read More: David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg, Marc Savard,
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines