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Joe Corvo looks to give power play a shot in the arm 09.14.11 at 1:26 pm ET
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Joe Corvo had 191 shots on goal last season. (AP)

WILMINGTON — In case being traded to the Bruins the day Tomas Kaberle signed with his team wasn’t enough of a hint, Joe Corvo is well aware that he’s in Boston to fill a role.

“From what I hear, it’s some power-play time, some shots on the power play and getting it to guys, just moving the puck, skating the puck, trying to bring a little of the offensive flair to it and making plays with some of the guys on the team, the skill guys,” Corvo said Wednesday as he met the Boston media.

Shooting is something on which Corvo prides himself on, and something Kaberle rarely did in his days as a Bruin. It would seem it’s simply a difference in philosophy for the two players, as the pretty passes may now be absent with Kaberle gone.

“He looks for the pass, looks to set guys up. If the shot’s there, I’m going to take it most of the time,” Corvo said. “I think a lot of power-play goals aren’t the cute, tic-tac-toe goals. A lot of them are rebound goals. And the more you hit the net and put it on goal, guys are going to be around the net and score.”

Corvo said the day Kaberle signed with the Hurricanes was a strange one, as he had known the Bruins were interested him but that a deal wouldn’t be made unless Kaberle signed with Carolina.

“I had heard that it kind of hinged on him signing there, whether they would sign him there or what they were going to do,” he said. “But it was obviously a great surprised. I was just happy to kind of be in a market again where everybody’s so crazy about hockey and hockey’s so important. It’ll just be fun to play.”

More to come later on Corvo.

Read More: Joe Corvo, Tomas Kaberle,
Brad Marchand, Joe Corvo among those in attendance at Bruins’ first veterans practice 09.08.11 at 12:25 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — The Bruins held their first veterans practice of 2011 as they prepare for the start of training camp next weekend. The skate lasted about an hour and saw several familiar faces.

There was one notable attendee and one notable absence in the group, as Brad Marchand was on the ice despite not having a contract for the coming season. Winger Nathan Horton, who participated in each and every veterans practice a season ago, was not in attendance. He was knocked out of the playoffs in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals on a hit from Aaron Rome and had a separated shoulder in addition to his concussion, but said last month that he was ready to go. We’ll see if he takes the ice in the coming days.

Speaking of newcomers, defenseman Joe Corvo, who came to the team in a July trade with the Hurricanes, was out there. No sign of Benoit Pouliot yet.

Here’s the list of those spotted: Andrew Ference, Zdeno Chara, Johnny Boychuk, Tyler Seguin, Steven Kampfer, Milan Lucic, Marchand, David Krejci, Sean Thornton, Corvo, Adam McQuaid, Dennis Seidenberg, Gregory Campbell, Rich Peverley, Chris Kelly, Daniel Paille, Colby Cohen, Max Sauve, Jamie Arniel, Michael Hutchinson.

Read More: Brad Marchand, Joe Corvo, Nathan Horton,
Will Joe Corvo be able to replace Tomas Kaberle? 08.26.11 at 1:51 am ET
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With captains’ practices just two short weeks from commencing, WEEI.com will be looking at the questions facing the defending Stanley Cup champions in the 2011-12 season.

Today’s question is whether Joe Corvo will be able to replace Tomas Kaberle on the Bruins’ blue line. Corvo isn’t nearly as talented, but he’s definitely capable of doing what Kaberle did in a so-so stint in Boston. When you look at the fact that Corvo is in the last year of a deal with a $2.25 million cap hit, while Kaberle got a three-year, $12.75 million deal in Carolina, the exchange looks good for the Bruins.

Though it became trendy to give Kaberle a big pat on the back during the Cup finals for his improved play, the fact of the matter is that things had gotten to the point where Kaberle was getting less ice time than he’d ever gotten in his career (he actually played less than 10 minutes in Game 7 of the finals). Not to compare two different players in two different situations, but as a point of reference, Corvo averaged a little under 25 minutes per game last season (Kaberle had 21:15 with the B’s), but Corvo is sure to get less than that, assuming he becomes one of the six regular defensemen in Boston.

For the sake of comparison, Kaberle is a little bigger than Corvo, while Corvo is a better skater. (While Kaberle’s passing skills were as-advertised, one thing that stood out here with the Czech blueliner was how poor a skater he was). Corvo’s 40 points last season tied a career-high, while Kaberle had 47 points in a season that was close to on par with his recent output, but far from the 67 he had in the 2005-06 season.

One player with plenty of perspective on the matter is Dennis Seidenberg. He’s played with both defensemen, as he was teammates with Corvo in Carolina in the 2007-08 and 2008-09 seasons. Seidenberg, who occasionally played on a pairing with Corvo (Corvo was usually paired with Tim Gleason, while Seidenberg skated with Joni Pitkanen), gave his new and former teammate a glowing review this week.

“[He’s] a very, very good skater,” Seidenberg said of Corvo. “Good hands, good passer. Very fast. I like playing with him like I did in Carolina. I’m looking forward to it and I think he’ll fit in really well.”

But can he replace Kaberle? Seidenberg seems to think so.

“He’s an offensive guy and I’m sure he likes to shoot the puck, and that’s what we need – guys getting the puck to the net and creating rebounds,” Seidenberg said. “I think he’s been doing that in the past and I’m sure he’s going to do it again.”

The Bruins certainly did their offensive defenseman to shoot the puck, but that was not part of Kaberle’s repertoire. It is that area in which the Bruins are in luck. Corvo had 191 shots on goal last season, which would have placed him behind only Zdeno Chara (264) amongst Bruins defensemen. Kaberle had 130 over the course of last season, including 31 shots on goal in 24 regular-season games with the B’s.

There’s also the fact that Corvo will need to stave off Steven Kampfer, who hasn’t gone anywhere. On paper, it would seem that Kampfer could start next season in the role Adam McQuaid filled early last year as the seventh defenseman, but one shouldn’t count out Kampfer now that he’s healthy. Based on experience, though, it would seem a spot would be Corvo’s to lose.

In the end, Corvo can meet, exceed, or fall below expectations when it comes to replacing Kaberle. Ultimately, that could come down to whether people are talking about the pre-Boston Kaberle or the one who underwhelmed in black and gold. If it’s the latter, Corvo is certainly capable of doing what Kaberle did for $2 million less this year.

Read More: Joe Corvo, Steven Kampfer, Tomas Kaberle,
Andrew Ference has inkling he and Joe Corvo have at least one thing in common 07.20.11 at 3:10 pm ET
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When players begin showing up for captains practices and eventually training camp as the summer winds down and the preseason begins, Andrew Ference, like the other returning players from the Stanley Cup champions, will have a couple of new faces to meet.

Joe Corvo (Canada.com)

Ference will have a new fellow blueliner in defenseman Joe Corvo, for whom the B’s traded a fourth-round pick to the Hurricanes the day Tomas Kaberle signed with Carolina. Ference may not know Corvo personally, but he knows they’ll have a good ice-breaker for when they meet.

“I know he’s got a lot of tattoos, so we’ll be able to swap,” Ference said with a laugh.

Ference, the team’s resident tattoo aficionado, flew his tattoo artist in from Calgary so he and his teammates could commemorate their Stanley Cup championship with ink on breakup day. While many players discussed what types of tattoos they were considering that day, the final tally of players to go through with it was a measly seven, including Ference, Brad Marchand and Tyler Seguin. Ference noted that other teammates simply got them on other days, such as Chris Kelly, whom Ference said was set to get his this week.

While a simple google search will show that Seguin and Marchand (the latter of whom rarely wore a shirt in the week that followed the Cup win) got “Stanley Cup Champions Boston Bruins 6-15-11″ on the side of their ribs, Ference went with a very plain black-and-white spoked B on his right arm.

“Some guys got the writing, and I went with the B,” Ference said. “I don’t know. I left room for more years though.”

Ference will also meet Benoit Pouliot, with whom he’s already had at least one dealing. It was Ference who sparred with Pouliot in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals after the then-Canadiens forward attempted to hit Johnny Boychuk high on a dangerous play in the corner. Ference isn’t concerned about having any difficulty befriending who was once the enemy, citing the team’s ability to do it in the past.

“We got along fine with Michael Ryder,” Ference pointed out, as Ryder spent his entire career in the Montreal organization before becoming a popular guy in the Bruins’ dressing room.

While there are similarities between the two situations of Ryder and Pouliot in that both came to the Bruins after playing for the Habs (Ryder signed a three-year, $12 million deal with the B’s back in the summer of 2008), one would generally be far more skeptical of Pouliot today than they were of Ryder in 2008. Ryder was an established scorer in the NHL, while Pouliot, to borrow a bit of logic from Jack Edwards, has been nothing short of a fantastic bust since being drafted fourth overall by the Wild in 2005. For Pouliot to do anything like Ryder on the stat sheet would make the $1.1 million they dropped on the 24-year a sound investment.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Benoit Pouliot, Brad Marchand, Chris Kelly
Claude Julien optimistic about Joe Corvo’s impact with Bruins 07.11.11 at 1:29 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Bruins coach Claude Julien discussed the Bruins’ offseason moves and their prospects on the final day of development camp Monday. The B’s lost Michael Ryder and Tomas Kaberle to free agency, replacing them with Montreal’s Benoit Pouliot and Carolina’s Joe Corvo.

In the case of Kaberle and Corvo, Julien said the 34-year-old Corvo can help the power play, much like Kaberle was expected to when the B’s sent a package of commodities (a 2011 first-round pick, a 2012 second-rounder and center Joe Colborne) to Toronto or the defenseman.

“It’s not about replacing [Kaberle] but taking on his role,” Julien said of Corvo. “I think you look at Corvo, who’s got a really good shot. He’s a player that may be a little bit more physical and more engaged. We’re going to have to work with him as far as making him understand the way we play here. And I think the way we play will certainly help him a little bit, because we don’t want him running around. We want him playing well positionally.

“Again, he skates well and he’ll move the puck well. That’s where Kaberle … people that thought he underachieved a little bit. I think at the beginning we weren’t quite getting what we wanted. But once you saw him get a little comfortable, we’ve got to give him credit. He’s a smart player, he sees the ice well, makes good plays and that’s where his strength is. When you look at Corvo, his shot is going to be a lot better and hopefully on the power play which we did [get] some good shots from the back end, it will certainly help us.”

Corvo, for whom the Bruins traded a fourth-round pick, had 11 goals and 29 assists for 40 points last season. Kaberle had four goals and 43 assists for 47 assists with the Maple Leafs and Bruins in the regular season. He signed a three-year, $12.75 million deal with Carolina last week.

Read More: Claude Julien, Joe Corvo,
Bobby Orr on M&M: Tomas Kaberle let criticism get to him in Boston 07.06.11 at 12:07 pm ET
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Bruins legend Bobby Orr joined Mut & Merloni live from the Pinehills Golf Club for a charity golf event benefiting Mark Herzlich‘s foundation. Orr discussed the Bruins’ Stanley Cup run and offered updates on a couple of players his agency represents. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

“The Bruins have given us a lot to cheer about and talk about,” Orr said. “The heart that that team showed this year was incredible. Again, [Tim] Thomas shows that you cannot win without goaltending. This guy was incredible. If you look at that team everyone did something, someone came up one night and the next night it was someone else.”

Orr was asked about the Stanley Cup and its whereabouts. Orr noted how it is much different from when it was back when he won titles with the Bruins in 1970 and ’72.

“We didn’t get it like they do today,” he said. “We had it for the parade and that was it. I think it is wonderful. The Stanley Cup will be all over the world. I think it’s the only trophy in sports that it’s ‘The’ trophy, the others every year there is a new one. This is it. To have it all over the world, and let the kids touch it and see it. It is wonderful.”

Orr gave an injury update on forward Nathan Horton: “He’s fine,” Orr said of his client. “We really won’t know until he starts working out that will be the true test. I talked to him a few days ago and he feels great. He loves Boston, he was so excited to be in Boston. … We really won’t know until he starts working out. He has to let things settle down. He also hurt his shoulder in the Montreal series and probably shouldn’t have been playing, so he is trying to heal the shoulder and the concussion.”

On Tuesday the Bruins lost defenseman Tomas Kaberle to the Hurricanes but acquired defenseman Joe Corvo from Carolina in exchange for a fourth-round pick in 2012. Orr said that Corvo is a good player who can shoot the puck.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Bobby Orr, Joe Corvo, Nathan Horton, Tomas Kaberle
Meet new Bruins defenseman Joe Corvo 07.05.11 at 10:51 pm ET
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The Bruins didn’t take long in their search to replace Tomas Kaberle, as they traded a fourth-round pick to Carolina for Hurricanes defenseman Joe Corvo. The former Kings, Senators, Hurricanes and Capitals blueliner comes to Boston after his second stint in Carolina.

Joe Corvo is coming off a career-high 40-point season. (AP)

THE SKINNY

Age: 34

Height/Weight: 6-foot-0, 204 pounds

Draft: Fourth round, 83rd overall in the 1997 draft by the Kings.

Contractual status: Has one year remaining on his current deal, commands a $2.25 million cap hit.

2010-11 stats: 11 goals, 29 assists, 40 points, minus-14.

WHAT HE BRINGS

The Bruins are replacing one mid-thirties puck-moving defenseman with another, just at a lower price. Corvo will likely inherit Kaberle’s power play minutes, but he doesn’t give the puck up as easily as Kaberle did in his time with the Bruins. Fans in Boston likely won’t complain about Corvo’s shooting the way they did with Kaberle. Corvo had 191 shots on goal last season to Kaberle’s 130.

Corvo also provides the Bruins with another righty-shooting defenseman, meaning the B’s blueline will now be evenly split. Adam McQuaid and Johnny Boychuk are also right shots.

WHY THEY MADE THE DEAL

At the end of the day (literally), the final product after a busy hour seems to favor the Bruins. All things considered, losing Kaberle but saving money with a replacement who also happens to be right-handed is arguably a better scenario than re-signing Kaberle in the first place.

Kaberle’s new deal will call for the same annual cap hit ($4.25 million) as his last one. Corvo’s cap hit saves the B’s $2 million, and considering that he will be a free agent at the end of the season, they don’t need to worry about being saddled with the money of a player whose production is declining. With Kaberle, that would have to be an obvious concern over the next three seasons.

This now means three of the Bruins’ defensemen (the three right-handed shots in Corvo, McQuaid and Boychuk) will see their contracts expire at season’s end, and while McQuaid is restricted, the other two will be unrestricted free agents. They could have Dougie Hamilton ready for the start of the 2012-13 season, so it shouldn’t be hard to make room.

HE SAID

“This came as a surprise to me and a very pleasant surprise. I’m very happy to be with a team that’s coming off such an outstanding season and really hasn’t made many changes at all. I just think at this point in my career, this is just an excellent opportunity to win, and to have the chance to win. I couldn’t be any happier.”

CHIARELLI SAID

“He’s a tremendous skater, very quick so he’s good at retrieving pucks and skating them up through the neutral zone and making a good clean pass. He’s got a terrific shot, and I’ve seen him score often on one timers, I’ve seen him score often on receiving a pass and shooting. He’s very dangerous that way, so he gives us another hard shot from the right side. To me, with respect to the power play… obviously I liked his shot, but his skating and passing helps with the entries and he’ll be an asset to our power play.”

FUN FACT

Hailing from Oak Park, Ill., Corvo is now the third American player in the 2011-12 projected lineup. Goaltender Tim Thomas and defenseman Steven Kampfer are both from Michigan. Matt Bartkowksi, who played six games in the NHL last season, is a Pittsburgh native.

VIDEO

Read More: Joe Corvo, Tomas Kaberle,
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