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Barry Pederson on D&C: Bruins ‘are going to be a good team for a long time’ 06.25.13 at 10:05 am ET
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NESN analyst Barry Pederson, in an interview on the Dennis & Callahan show, identified a number of roster decisions that now face the Bruins following their elimination in a Game 6 loss to the Blackhawks. Still, Pederson suggested that the team’s long-term outlook remains excellent.

With a number of young, still-improving talents like Tyler Seguin, Matt Bartkowski and Dougie Hamilton, Pederson suggested that if Boston can re-sign restricted free agent Tuukka Rask and lock up Patrice Bergeron — who now has one year left in his contract — to an extension, the team has the core to continue to build upon its run of two Stanley Cup Finals and one championship in the last three years.

He emphasized the need for players like Tyler Seguin, Carl Soderberg and Jordan Caron to get stronger to help carry the Bruins through a 2013-14 season that starts in 13 weeks, but overall, Pederson pointed to a sunny outlook for a team that just endured a devastating defeat. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Barry Pederson, Carl Soderberg, Jordan Caron, Matt Bartkowski
Bruins still deciding between Kaspars Daugavins and Carl Soderberg 06.22.13 at 3:03 pm ET
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CHICAGO – Kaspars Daugavins or Carl Soderberg?

The reaction to that should be “whichever guy isn’t Carl Soderberg” given how little Soderberg has played in the NHL, but Claude Julien is making it clear — whether for gamesmanship’s sake or because he’s actually considering it — that the fourth line left wing spot is up in the air as the Bruins approach Game 5.

The options, in a nut shell: Daugavins, a defensive guy who has been pretty bad so far, from not ending Game 1 in triple overtime when he had the chance, taking a bad penalty in Game 3 then putting himself offsides on an opportunity out of the box and everything in between, or Soderberg, a star in the Swedish Elite League who has played just six NHL games and didn’t look particularly impressive. Daugavins has the experience, Soderberg has the offense and both have Julien’s consideration.

[Of course, Jordan Caron, who has experience with this team and has played more recently than Soderberg, would figure to be a better option than both, but for some reason the B’s say it’s down to Daugavins and Soderberg. Why Caron isn’t getting consideration is rather puzzling, but oh well.]

Daugavins and Soderberg took turns skating on the fourth line with Rich Peverley and Shawn Thornton in Saturday’s morning skate, a day after Soderberg donned a fourth-line jersey and Daugavins wore a green (healthy scratch) jersey. Julien was noncommittal regarding who would be in the lineup in Game 5, but said it would be one of the two.

“Why? Because I’m the coach and because I can,” he said. “You guys ask me why I make those changes. I didn’t spend three days thinking about that. It’s a situation that I can do. If I do that tonight, we’ll see where it goes. I may just go back to Daugavins, because again I’m tinkering between those two like I have from the beginning of the series.”

Well, he actually hasn’t been tinkering considering that Daugavins has been in the lineup the entire series, but sure. While Soderberg politely declined to talk to the media after morning skate, Daugavins said that he doesn’t know whether he’s in. He did say that it’s been an interesting series for him thus far whether or not he stays in the lineup, as he’s seen his ice time go down over the course of the series (from 15:09 to 8:28 to 6:30 to 5:57), which has meant sweating it out on the bench a lot more.

“It’s more nerve-racking sitting on the bench than being on the ice, because when you go out there, you go into game mode. You don’t even think about it. You just do it. Your instincts come into play,” he said. “When you sit on the bench and watch, you’re like a super fan. You cheer for the guys and you get nervous when the puck is close to your net, and you pull your hair when there’s a good scoring chance for somebody. It’s definitely more nerve-racking sitting on the bench than playing.”

Julien has mentioned multiple times that in today’s NHL, players communicate with the coach far more than they used to. If they’re not playing, they want to know why, and if they are playing, they want to know how they can be better. Daugavins says he hasn’t bugged Julien about his situation, just trusting that if he learns from each game, he’ll improve.

“I watch my own tape and talk to a couple guys,” he said. “It’s a learning [experience] for me, obviously my first time in the finals, so I try to make the best of it. I’ve gotten a couple of scoring chances and should have scored. Maybe in the regular season you do, but in the finals you should bear down and you’re a little nervous, but things happen. If you get another [chance], you try to put it in. You just have to watch the tape and fix it instead of being pissed about it.”

Read More: Carl Soderberg, Jordan Caron, Kaspars Daugavins,
Barry Pederson on D&C: Torey Krug’s third-period turnover ‘turning point’ in Game 1 06.13.13 at 10:19 am ET
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NESN Bruins analyst Barry Pederson joined Dennis & Callahan on Thursday morning, and following the Bruins’€™ 4-3 triple-overtime loss to the Blackhawks in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals, Pederson pegged defenseman Torey Krug‘€™s third-period turnover that led to Chicago’€™s second goal as a turning point.

Krug’€™s cross-ice pass got intercepted by Andrew Shaw, who assisted Dave Bolland‘€™s goal to cut the Bruins’ lead to 3-2 midway through the third period.

‘€œThe Bruins had complete control of this hockey game early in the third with that 3-1 lead. People I think are talking about the deflection, the bad break they got. But to me the turning point of the hockey game was the giveaway by Krug in his own end,’€ Pederson said. ‘€œThat’€™s one of those plays that’€™s a rookie mistake under pressure. You have the near-side wall is wide open. You either have to carry it up or make that play. As we’€™re taught as youngsters throughout your hockey career, there’€™s one play you don’€™t make in your own end, and that’€™s cross ice. That to me was the one that really changed things.”

It was that turnover ‘€” and the ensuing ‘€œemotional letdown’€ ‘€” that did in the Bruins more than potential complacency up by two goals with about half a period to go, Pederson noted.

Despite the error, Pederson said he doesn’€™t think Claude Julien will bench Krug for Game 2 Saturday, nor does he think the rookie defenseman should be benched. Pederson noted that Krug’€™s ice time was lessened for much of the rest of the game, but he doesn’€™t expect that to carry over.

‘€œI would hope not,’€ Pederson said, ‘€œbecause they really need him. He brings that element of speed and offense to the lineup, and I think he helps their power play as well.”

When the hosts expressed concern that the Bruins, particularly the older players, might be lagging come Saturday, Pederson said not to worry ‘€” the Blackhawks are in the same position, after all.

The bigger concern should be replacing Nathan Horton, if needed, after the forward left with an upper-body injury in the first overtime. Pederson suggested moving Tyler Seguin up to replace Horton on the first line, as Julien played it the rest of Game 1.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Barry Pederson, Carl Soderberg, Claude Julien, Jordan Caron
A look at every (realistic) scenario to replace Gregory Campbell in Bruins lineup 06.06.13 at 2:17 pm ET
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With Gregory Campbell done for the season with a broken right leg, the Bruins have some decisions to make as they go about addressing their lineup.

Of their four options — Kaspars Daugavins, Jordan Caron, Carl Soderberg and Jay Pandolfo — all but Soderberg present them with multiple moves that would need to be made to fill Campbell’s role at center. That means that either Rich Peverley or Chris Kelly could be looking at moving down to center the fourth line. It’s also worth noting that the B’s might want to consider someone who can take Campbell’s role on the penalty kill.

Soderberg is the only option of the four who can play center, while the other three can kill penalties. The guess here is that it will be Daugavins or Caron. And before we jump into the case for each player, don’t even think about Tyler Seguin moving to center. It’s not happening because he — at this point at least — can’t play the position in the NHL.

Here’s a look at Claude Julien‘s options and how the bottom six forwards look with them in:

KASPARS DAUGAVINS

Last game played: May 1

Why he would make sense: Can kill penalties, has played a game thus far in the postseason.

Why he wouldn’t make sense: Not a center. Hasn’t been overly impressive in his brief time in Boston’s lineup. More turnovers than you’d expect from a defensive-minded forward.

What the bottom six would look like with him:

Paille – Kelly – Seguin
Daugavins – Peverley – Thornton

OR

Daugavins – Kelly – Seguin
Paille – Peverley – Thornton

OR

Paille – Peverley – Seguin
Daugavins – Kelly – Thornton

OR

Daugavins – Peverley – Seguin
Paille – Kelly – Thornton

JORDAN CARON

Last game played: May 22 (for Providence)

Why he would make sense: He’s played the most recently of the Bruins’ options and doesn’t make mistakes. He also kills penalties.

Why he wouldn’t make sense: Putting him in would mean making multiple moves as far as shuffling the lineup goes.

What the bottom six would look like with him:

Paille – Kelly – Seguin
Caron – Peverley – Thornton

OR

Caron – Kelly – Seguin
Paille – Peverley – Thornton

OR

Paille – Peverley – Seguin
Caron – Kelly – Thornton

OR

Caron – Peverley – Seguin
Paille – Kelly – Thornton

CARL SODERBERG

Last game played: April 28

Why he would make sense: Of the options, he’s the only center. You could plug him into Campbell’s spot on the fourth line and not have to make any further changes to the 5-on-5 lineup.

Why he wouldn’t make sense: Lack of experience and the fact that he doesn’t kill penalties. He’s played just six career NHL games, and though he’s had lots of time to get used to the smaller ice in practice, having him figure out the NHL in the playoffs would be a bit risky.

What the bottom six would look like with him:

Peverley – Kelly – Seguin
Paille – Soderberg – Thornton

JAY PANDOLFO

Last game played: April 6

Why he would make sense: Has played 131 career playoff games, can kill penalties.

Why he wouldn’t make sense: Has been out of the lineup for a long, long time. Part of the reason the Bruins played Torey Krug over Aaron Johnson is because Johnson had been out of game action for so long.

What the bottom six would look like with him:

Paille – Kelly – Seguin
Pandolfo – Peverley – Thornton

OR

Paille – Peverley – Seguin
Pandolfo – Kelly – Thornton

Read More: Carl Soderberg, Gregory Campbell, Jay Pandolfo, Jordan Caron
Johnny Boychuk out, Rich Peverley back in Bruins lineup vs. Maple Leafs 03.23.13 at 7:13 pm ET
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Johnny Boychuk will miss Saturday’s game against the Maple Leafs, with Matt Bartkowski making his season debut in Boychuk’s place. Boychuk suffered a leg injury in Friday’s practice, causing the B’s to recall Bartkowski from Providence.

Rich Peverley, who was a healthy scratch Thursday against the Senators, is back in the lineup. Claude Julien is keeping Ryan Spooner in the lineup, with Jordan Caron a healthy scratch against the Leafs. Spooner will center Peverley and Jay Pandolfo.

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Johnny Boychuk, Jordan Caron, Matt Bartkowski, Rich Peverley
Bruins prepare for another back-to-back 03.10.13 at 11:44 am ET
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WILMINGTON — The Bruins returned to practice Sunday at Ristuccia Arena in preparation for a back-to-back in Ottawa Monday and Pittsburgh Tuesday. This week’s will be the Bruins’ second of three back-to-backs in the month of March.

The lines appeared to be the same as they have been since the team called up Jordan Caron, with the 22-year-old splitting duties with Jay Pandolfo on Chris Kelly‘s line.

The 16-3-3 B’s woke up Sunday with the second most points in the Eastern Conference, trailing the 16-5-4 Canadiens by one point. The Habs, who have 36 points to Boston’s 35, have played three more games (25) than the Bruins (22).

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After bad luck and bad games, Jordan Caron happy to be back with Bruins 03.08.13 at 2:57 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Jordan Caron feels that Friday’s call-up was a long time coming, but a myriad of factors — the lockout, injuries and inconsistency — made his wait to resume his NHL career a little longer.

Caron, who was drafted 25th overall by the Bruins in 2009, was called up and sent down over half a dozen times last season, but he strung together some success at this time last year. From March 4 to March 10, Caron had points in four straight games, scoring three goals and adding four assists for seven points.

When the Bruins traded Benoit Pouliot in the offseason and Brian Rolston did not return, it appeared Caron could be destined to finally be given a full-time shot for the B’s after going up and down between Boston and Providence in his first two seasons. That didn’t happen, as the lockout forced him to begin the season in Providence, where he suffered a shoulder injury that kept him out of training camp when the NHL finally got the ball rolling in January.

“I had a really good second half last year, and I wanted to come here this year and keep going in the same path,” he said. “Obviously with the lockout, it didn’t go that way. Going down to Providence, I wasn’t really happy about it, but there was nothing I could do. I just wanted to go out there and play and be ready for the when the [NHL] season would start.”

It wasn’t the only injury he had to deal with. After Caron returned from his shoulder injury, he took to the face on Jan. 31 (there is still a noticeable cut under his right eye), which caused him to miss time. Factor in that he wasn’t playing necessarily well in Providence (10 goals, five assists in 44 games), and there’s more than enough evidence that it’s been a frustrating season for the 22-year-old winger.

“I wanted to be here,” he said. “With the lockout, it was kind of bad luck, but I was trying to focus as much as I could in Providence. I’m not having my best season ever, but I think right now, just being here, it’s like a new season, a new start. Hopefully I can get it going even better.”

The good news for Caron is that he has picked it up of late, with four goals and three assists for seven points over his last nine games. He attributes his recent success to being put on a line with Christian Hanson and Bobby Robins, which he says has allowed him to “get back to basics.”

With Chris Bourque down in Providence, it would appear Caron’s new linemates figure to be Chris Kelly and Rich Peverley when he gets into the lineup. Caron skated with the line in Friday’s practice, splitting left wing duties with Jay Pandolfo. Claude Julien wouldn’t say after Friday’s practice whether the B’s intend to get Caron into the lineup Saturday against the Flyers, but Caron would welcome a reunion with Kelly after spending time on his line last season.

“Obviously Kells is a really good defensive player and is really smart on the ice,” Caron said. “For my part, my job is to go on the forecheck and create turnovers, so I know with Kells, I’ve just got to go and not think about posting up as the third man.”

In 71 career NHL games, Caron has 10 goals and 12 assists for the Bruins. Despite how long ago it may have been, he’s still encouraged by what he was able to do in the second half of last season, and the Bruins expect him to build on it.

“I thought he played pretty well at the end of last year,” Julien said. “He’s a big body. He’s strong along the walls. We asked him to do some things in Providence this year — take pucks to the net and go to the net — and he’s done that. It’s about giving him that opportunity now to show us that he’s gotten better.”

Read More: Jordan Caron,
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