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Tyler Seguin: ‘My understanding is I could go to [AHL]‘ 09.14.12 at 2:18 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — As players figure out where they might spend the NHL lockout, Tyler Seguin helped clear up his situation a bit by saying he believes he is eligible to play in the AHL this season.

Seguin is a veteran of 175 NHL games (including playoffs) and would seemingly have to go through waivers, but the third-year winger said (vaguely) that he thinks he can play in the AHL.

“My understanding is I could go to Providence,” he said. “I haven’t decided anything and we haven’t talked about anything. I haven’t talked to management since [signing] the contract, so nothing’s going in forward motion with that stuff. I’m just trying to wait it out and hopefully something happens here with the CBA.”

A source told WEEI.com that Seguin could not get to the AHL without clearing waivers because of how many games he’s played, though the possibility exists (as pointed out by Mike Loftus of the Patriot Ledger on Twitter) that waivers could be avoided if a situation arises in which Seguin could simply sign an AHL contract.

The rule regarding waivers states that players who signed their entry-level deals at age 18 (as Seguin did) would be exempt from waivers if they played less than 160 NHL games. Seguin, at the aforementioned 175 games, does not qualify.

Earlier in the week, Seguin said that he was considering either the AHL or potentially looking at Europe, something he reiterated Friday.

“You’ve got to be cautious and have some options,” he said. “Obviously I have mine, but for right now you want to play NHL hockey first. That’s what I’m hoping for.”

According to the Boston Globe’s Kevin Paul Dupont, Jordan Caron will play for Providence if there’s a lockout. Given that he has played 73 games at the NHL, he will be exempt from waivers. The B’s placed Garnet Exelby, Christian Hanson, Jamie Tardif, and Trent Whitfield on waivers this week in order to have them play in the AHL.

Read More: Jordan Caron, Tyler Seguin,
Thoughts from after the NHL draft 06.23.12 at 11:32 pm ET
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Unlike the NFL or NBA draft, many fans won’€™t be familiar with the name they hear when their team make a pick. It’€™s safe to say that every Bruins fan knew the name well when Boston chose 24th overall Friday night.

The Bruins opted for goaltender Malcolm Subban, brother of Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban, in the first round to the surprise of many. The pick means that the Bruins and Canadiens could have brothers starring on each side of the rivalry down the road, but that’€™s all years away.

‘€œWe draft on best player available, fit, need and then rivalries,’€ Peter Chiarelli said with a laugh when asked about the pick. ‘€œThat was on top for this one.’€

While fans’€™ initial reactions may have been to the fact that the Bruins drafted a Subban, the far more intriguing aspect is that they drafted such a highly rated goalie. The organization could have stood to add another netminder in this year’€™s draft, but adding Subban immediately makes him Boston’€™s brightest goaltending prospect.

Like many goaltenders in their draft years, Subban is years away from being NHL ready. Zane Gothberg and Lars Volden, who were sixth round picks of the team in 2010 and 2011, respectively, are similarly far off from having an impact at the NHL level.

Last season while playing for Bellville (OHL), Subban had a 2.50 goals-against average and .923 save percentage. He stands at 6-foot-1 and 195 pounds and was the second goalie off the board this year behind Russian goaltender Andrey Vasilevskiy, whom the Lightning chose 19th overall.

In addition to NHL netminders Tuukka Rask and Anton Khudobin, the Bruins also have Niklas Svedberg, Adam Courchaine, Michael Hutchinson and Adam Morrison under contract. Gothberg is expected to attend the University of North Dakota in the fall, while Volden is playing in the SM-liiga in Finland.

Here are some more thoughts following the 2012 NHL draft.

IS IT CARON’€™S TIME?

Perhaps the happiest member of the Bruins this draft weekend was their 2009 first-round pick in Jordan Caron. By dealing away restricted free agent Benoit Pouliot‘€™s rights to the Lightning, the Bruins opened up a spot for Caron to potentially step in and stay in the lineup for good.

Free agency and the trade market can change that, of course, as the Bruins could bring in a veteran forward (something Chiarelli has said he’€™d like to do), but Caron’€™s emergence down the stretch last season indicated he’€™s finally ready for a full NHL season. The Bruins would be wise to give him that opportunity. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: James Van Riemsdyk, Jordan Caron, Luke Schenn, Malcolm Subban
Looking back and ahead: Jordan Caron 05.18.12 at 4:23 pm ET
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With the Bruins’ season in the books, WEEI.com will take a look at each player on the roster one-by-one to provide some perspective on what went wrong this season and what the future holds for the 2011 champions.

Jordan Caron

Age: 21

2011-12 stats: 48 games played, 7 goals, 8 assists, 15 points, even rating

Contract status: signed through 2012-13 season ($1.1 million cap hit), restricted free agent after next season

Looking back: After going back and forth between Boston and Providence and playing in 23 NHL games in the 2010-11 season, Caron’s goal this time around was to stay with the big club for the entire 2011-12 campaign.

That didn’t exactly happen, as Caron was sent to Providence six different times this past season. Unlike his first taste of the NHL in the Bruins’ Cup-winning season, however, Caron was able to sustain a stretch in which he made clear why the Bruins selected him in the first round of the 2009 draft.

Caron totaled eight points over a six-game run from March 4-13 (four goals, four assists), and even saw his impressive play earn him time as a top-six forward after spending the vast majority of his NHL ice time as a third-or-fourth-liner.

Though his improved play down the stretch forced Daniel Paille to sit as the healthy scratch late in the season, Caron began the postseason in the press box. When the Bruins were struggling for offensive production in the first round, it seemed Caron could be inserted into the lineup in place of a fourth-liner in hopes of giving the team a bit of an offensive spark. Such strategy became a moot point, as Patrice Bergeron‘s oblique injury (which prevented him from taking faceoffs), forced Julien to play Caron instead of Shawn Thornton for the last two games against Washington just in case Bergeron went down during the game and the team needed a noter top-six forward.

Bergeron was able to play through the pain in Games 6 and 7, so Caron averaged 6:41 of ice time in his first two career playoff games.

Looking ahead: While Benoit Pouliot‘s surprising consistency and the trade for Brian Rolston made it tough for Caron to stay in the lineup (and even on the NHL roster) for the entire season, you would have to think that next season will be Caron’s time to stick.

Given the plethora of free agent forwards (Rolston, Chris Kelly, Paille, Gregory Campbell and the restricted Pouliot) and the fact that the B’s wouldn’t want to stunt to their former first-round pick’s development, the stars seem to be aligning for Caron to finally be given a full-time chance in the NHL.

Caron has spent practically all of his time in the NHL this point as a bottom-six forward when he’s been in the lineup, and it would seem that he’ll be in for more of the same next year. If Paille isn’t re-signed, Caron could end up skating with Campbell and Thornton while pushing for time on the third line. That isn’t to say there might not be immediate opportunity for Caron on the third line by the time training camp rolls around. Rolston could retire, the team could opt to not retain Pouliot or Kelly could opt for a bigger paycheck in a different market. Should Kelly leave, Rich Peverley could be an option to play center in Kelly’s place, and if either Rolston or Pouliot isn’t back, Caron could take the vacated wing spot. The Quebec native has played both left and right wing in the NHL for the B’s.

The thinking here is that the Bruins should do what they can to ensure Caron gets a prolonged look on the third line next season, preferably with Kelly as the pivot should they bring back the alternate captain. While the team’s offensive depth is undeniable, the Bruins have yet to fully replace Michael Ryder‘s offensive production with a third-line winger. With a full season, something along the lines of 18 goals shouldn’t be too out of reach for Caron.

Regardless of line he plays on next season, Caron will also be an option to serve more as a penalty killer for the B’s. Claude Julien obviously values two-way players highly, so don’t think he won’t try to get everything he can out of the defensively savvy youngster.

Read More: Benoit Pouliot, Brian Rolston, Jordan Caron,
Looking back and ahead: Daniel Paille 05.17.12 at 12:32 am ET
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With the Bruins’ season in the books, WEEI.com will take a look at each player on the roster one-by-one to provide some perspective on what went wrong this season and what the future holds for the 2011 champions.

Daniel Paille

Age: 28

2011-12 stats: 69 games played, 9 goals, 6 assists, 15 points, minus-5

Contract status: Unrestricted free agent ($1.075 million cap hit in 2011-12)

Looking back: While the retirement of Mark Recchi and the free agent defection of Michael Ryder left some uncertainty as to how Boston’s top three lines would look entering the season, it seemed a certainty entering camp that Claude Julien would not touch the fourth line of Paille, Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton. That was indeed the case, and Julien kept the “Merlot Line,” as Thornton has long called it for the maroon practice sweaters of fourth-line players, intact.

Though the line (at least the incarnation with Paille rather than Brad Marchand) did not see its offensive success of the previous season, the trio of Paille, Campbell and Thornton continued to bring what’s required of it: energy and prolonged stays in the offensive zone.

For the most part, the former Sabres first-round pick had horrible luck this season. He was hit in the face by a Steve Staios slapshot to the face on Nov. 7. He also suffered a mild concussion on Dec. 8 and dealt with an arm injury in early March. He also found himself as the odd man out when Jordan Caron‘s torrid play down the stretch left him in the press box for four games in late March. Despite the numerous injuries and healthy scratches, Paille missed only 13 games over the course of the regular season.

It wasn’t his best statistical campaign (he still hasn’t repeated his 19-goal performance of 2007-08 with the Sabres), but it was a season in which Paille proved to be a bit of an iron man for Boston due to his ability to get back into the lineup quickly after injuries. If such goofy statistics were kept, it wouldn’t be surprising if Paille led the league in shorthanded scoring opportunities. As has long been the case with Paille, his finishing skills often let him down, but his ability to do everything but score makes him perfectly suitable as a fourth-liner and penalty killer.

Paille actually did not take a penalty in the first half of the season. In fact, his first trip to the box of the season was a fighting major that came on Jan. 16 against Ed Jovanovski, the second second fighting major of the 28-year-old’s career. He finished the regular season with 15 penalty minutes.

Looking ahead: When it comes to the Bruins’ priorities with their free agents this summer, Paille is certainly no Chris Kelly, but he’s still someone who has carved out a niche in Boston and would be a good guy to have back.

Paille is one of five Bruins forwards who are free agents (the others are Kelly, Campbell, Brian Rolston and the restricted Benoit Pouliot), so Boston’s offense could look pretty different next season. If Paille isn’t brought back, it could open up a full-time job for Caron or provide an opportunity for a youngster like Jared Knight. If Rolston retires (which he has yet to decide), a spot for Caron might be there anyway.

The 28-year-old Paille is also a great character guy who is a good presence in the Bruins’ dressing room. After spending the previous season seeing significant time as a healthy scratch, it seemed he had earned himself a full-time job in the Boston lineup this season, but he didn’t feel entitled or pout when Julien had to scratch him in favor of Caron late in the regular season. Of course, if Paille does re-sign with the Bruins, he’ll probably do so in hopes of being in the lineup every night.

Paille might never end up justifying his first-round selection (20th overall back in 2002), but he serves his role as a fourth-liner very well in Boston. Perhaps there there will be opportunities in free agency for the Ontario native to play more and on a higher line, but the Bruins would be smart to do what they can to retain his services.

Read More: Daniel Paille, Jared Knight, Jordan Caron,
Will Bruins go with Jordan Caron or Shawn Thornton in Game 7? 04.25.12 at 1:28 pm ET
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Shawn Thornton or Jordan Caron?

That’s the question that Bruins coach Claude Julien faces going into the most important game of the season. Caron played in his first career postseason game Sunday when Julien called his number for Game 6.

“I was waiting for that for a little while, so I was pretty happy when Claude told me I was going to play,” Caron said. “It went well, so I was pretty happy with it.”

Julien had been saying throughout the series that he was keeping Caron in mind when it came to Boston’s lineup. When Patrice Bergeron had to leave Game 5 but was healthy enough to go in Game 6, the B’s went with Caron, presumably because he could play on the second line if anything were to happen to the Selke finalist.

On Wednesday, Bergeron was on the ice for morning skate but did not take faceoffs. That means that he’s still banged up a little bit, something that could have been assumed when No. 37 wasn’t on the ice in Tuesday’s practice.

Julien has confirmed multiple times that Bergeron will be in the lineup in Game 7, but if his status is still even the least bit shaky, the team could elect to keep Caron in and Thornton out. Another option is to play Thornton anyway, and if anything happens to Bergeron the team could explore putting Brian Rolston on right wing of the line with Rich Peverley at center.

With Caron unsure of his status, he’s had to do something he’s done a lot of over the last two seasons: prepare as though he’s playing and hope for the best.

“I think a lot of it is mentally. You just need to prepare,” he said. “You don’t know if you’re playing or not, so I think you’ve just got to be ready to jump in and do your job.”

Said Julien: “We talked to him before the series started, because I thought if anything, he was a real good player for us in that last stretch of the regular season. It was tough to take him out [before the playoffs] but we went with some experienced guys, first and foremost. The one thing that we said to him ‘€“ we said you’€™ve got to stay ready because there’€™s going to come a point where we’€™re going to need you and obviously we did last game.”

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Jordan Caron, Shawn Thornton,
Patrice Bergeron absent from Bruins practice 04.24.12 at 11:47 am ET
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WILMINGTON — The Bruins took the ice at Ristuccia Arena Tuesday for what may be their last practice of the season. All players were present with the exception 0f Patrice Bergeron and Adam McQuaid, the latter of whom remains out after not practicing yet this postseason. The B’s will host the Capitals in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals on Wednesday night.

With Bergeron not on the ice, Jordan Caron wore a gold sweater and skated on the second line. Joe Corvo (lower-body) skated after missing Sunday’s Game 6, but didn’t appear to be among the Bruins’ top six defensemen in practice. The lines were as follows:

Milan LucicDavid KrejciTyler Seguin

Brad MarchandRich Peverley – Jordan Caron

Benoit Pouliot – Chris KellyBrian Rolston

Daniel PailleGregory CampbellShawn Thornton

Zdeno CharaDennis Seidenberg

Andrew FerenceJohnny Boychuk

Greg Zanon – Mike Mottau

(Andrew Bodnarchuk – Joe Corvo)

Tim Thomas

Tuukka Rask

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Jordan Caron, Patrice Bergeron,
Thoughts on the Bruins’ new lines 04.20.12 at 11:03 pm ET
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Claude Julien has changed his lines an uncharacteristic number of times this postseason, but his latest work is more drastic than perhaps any of the tinkering he’s done this season.

Out of the top six are Tyler Seguin and Brad Marchand. Seguin skated with the third line in Friday’s practice, while Brad Marchand was back to the Merlot Line with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton.

Marchand began last season on the fourth line before moving up to Patrice Bergeron‘s line mid-season and never looking back. After finishing second on the Bruins with 28 goals in the regular season, he’s been among the many B’s who have opened the postseason with rather uninspired play.

Here are what the lines were in Friday’s practice, according to reports:

Milan LucicDavid KrejciBrian Rolston
Daniel PaillePatrice BergeronRich Peverley
Benoit Pouliot – Chris KellyTyler Seguin/Jordan Caron
Brad Marchand – Gregory CampbellShawn Thornton

“Making line changes, that’€™s a part of trying to find solutions and it’€™s as simple as that,” Julien told reporters after Friday’s practice. “You’€™ve got to mix up guys who are not getting the results that we’€™d like to, so you’€™re trying to make changes that will maybe spark that part of our game.”

Here are some thoughts on the new lines for the Bruins:

- Not one line is the same as it was when the postseason began. The most radically changed trio is Bergeron’s, as Rich Peverley played only parts of the last two games with Bergeron, while Daniel Paille makes the jump from the fourth line.

- Julien obviously did this hoping that he can wake up some of his snoozing superstars. The top two lines in each game have gone scoreless thus far this series, as the team has had to rely on bottom-six forwards primarily for their scoring.

- While Seguin has been one of the Bruins’ worst players this postseason, taking him away from Bergeron is a risk. Seguin has underachieved in the past when playing on lower lines, but perhaps Chris Kelly and Benoit Pouliot — two of Boston’s better forwards this series — can get him going.

- The Bruins are deep enough that they can be tied in a series through four games despite the fact that their best forwards have been kept off the score sheet, but the Bruins really need to get something out of David Krejci. If Krejci repeats his first-round performance from last postseason (one assist), the B’s could be in trouble. Remember, he was having difficulty generating points against Carey Price in the first round a year ago. This is Braden Holtby, and the Bruins still haven’t consistently tested him for three periods.

- The Bruins should try to get Jordan Caron into the lineup, but for whom? As bad as Seguin was in the first three games before looking a little better on Thursday, scratching your regular-season leader in points should be out of the question. Caron brings a strong two-way game and had a stretch of eight points (four goals, four assists) in six games in March.

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Brad Marchand, David Krejci, Jordan Caron
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