Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Jordan Caron’
Looking back and ahead: Daniel Paille 05.17.12 at 12:32 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

With the Bruins’ season in the books, WEEI.com will take a look at each player on the roster one-by-one to provide some perspective on what went wrong this season and what the future holds for the 2011 champions.

Daniel Paille

Age: 28

2011-12 stats: 69 games played, 9 goals, 6 assists, 15 points, minus-5

Contract status: Unrestricted free agent ($1.075 million cap hit in 2011-12)

Looking back: While the retirement of Mark Recchi and the free agent defection of Michael Ryder left some uncertainty as to how Boston’s top three lines would look entering the season, it seemed a certainty entering camp that Claude Julien would not touch the fourth line of Paille, Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton. That was indeed the case, and Julien kept the “Merlot Line,” as Thornton has long called it for the maroon practice sweaters of fourth-line players, intact.

Though the line (at least the incarnation with Paille rather than Brad Marchand) did not see its offensive success of the previous season, the trio of Paille, Campbell and Thornton continued to bring what’s required of it: energy and prolonged stays in the offensive zone.

For the most part, the former Sabres first-round pick had horrible luck this season. He was hit in the face by a Steve Staios slapshot to the face on Nov. 7. He also suffered a mild concussion on Dec. 8 and dealt with an arm injury in early March. He also found himself as the odd man out when Jordan Caron‘s torrid play down the stretch left him in the press box for four games in late March. Despite the numerous injuries and healthy scratches, Paille missed only 13 games over the course of the regular season.

It wasn’t his best statistical campaign (he still hasn’t repeated his 19-goal performance of 2007-08 with the Sabres), but it was a season in which Paille proved to be a bit of an iron man for Boston due to his ability to get back into the lineup quickly after injuries. If such goofy statistics were kept, it wouldn’t be surprising if Paille led the league in shorthanded scoring opportunities. As has long been the case with Paille, his finishing skills often let him down, but his ability to do everything but score makes him perfectly suitable as a fourth-liner and penalty killer.

Paille actually did not take a penalty in the first half of the season. In fact, his first trip to the box of the season was a fighting major that came on Jan. 16 against Ed Jovanovski, the second second fighting major of the 28-year-old’s career. He finished the regular season with 15 penalty minutes.

Looking ahead: When it comes to the Bruins’ priorities with their free agents this summer, Paille is certainly no Chris Kelly, but he’s still someone who has carved out a niche in Boston and would be a good guy to have back.

Paille is one of five Bruins forwards who are free agents (the others are Kelly, Campbell, Brian Rolston and the restricted Benoit Pouliot), so Boston’s offense could look pretty different next season. If Paille isn’t brought back, it could open up a full-time job for Caron or provide an opportunity for a youngster like Jared Knight. If Rolston retires (which he has yet to decide), a spot for Caron might be there anyway.

The 28-year-old Paille is also a great character guy who is a good presence in the Bruins’ dressing room. After spending the previous season seeing significant time as a healthy scratch, it seemed he had earned himself a full-time job in the Boston lineup this season, but he didn’t feel entitled or pout when Julien had to scratch him in favor of Caron late in the regular season. Of course, if Paille does re-sign with the Bruins, he’ll probably do so in hopes of being in the lineup every night.

Paille might never end up justifying his first-round selection (20th overall back in 2002), but he serves his role as a fourth-liner very well in Boston. Perhaps there there will be opportunities in free agency for the Ontario native to play more and on a higher line, but the Bruins would be smart to do what they can to retain his services.

Read More: Daniel Paille, Jared Knight, Jordan Caron,
Will Bruins go with Jordan Caron or Shawn Thornton in Game 7? 04.25.12 at 1:28 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Shawn Thornton or Jordan Caron?

That’s the question that Bruins coach Claude Julien faces going into the most important game of the season. Caron played in his first career postseason game Sunday when Julien called his number for Game 6.

“I was waiting for that for a little while, so I was pretty happy when Claude told me I was going to play,” Caron said. “It went well, so I was pretty happy with it.”

Julien had been saying throughout the series that he was keeping Caron in mind when it came to Boston’s lineup. When Patrice Bergeron had to leave Game 5 but was healthy enough to go in Game 6, the B’s went with Caron, presumably because he could play on the second line if anything were to happen to the Selke finalist.

On Wednesday, Bergeron was on the ice for morning skate but did not take faceoffs. That means that he’s still banged up a little bit, something that could have been assumed when No. 37 wasn’t on the ice in Tuesday’s practice.

Julien has confirmed multiple times that Bergeron will be in the lineup in Game 7, but if his status is still even the least bit shaky, the team could elect to keep Caron in and Thornton out. Another option is to play Thornton anyway, and if anything happens to Bergeron the team could explore putting Brian Rolston on right wing of the line with Rich Peverley at center.

With Caron unsure of his status, he’s had to do something he’s done a lot of over the last two seasons: prepare as though he’s playing and hope for the best.

“I think a lot of it is mentally. You just need to prepare,” he said. “You don’t know if you’re playing or not, so I think you’ve just got to be ready to jump in and do your job.”

Said Julien: “We talked to him before the series started, because I thought if anything, he was a real good player for us in that last stretch of the regular season. It was tough to take him out [before the playoffs] but we went with some experienced guys, first and foremost. The one thing that we said to him ‘€“ we said you’€™ve got to stay ready because there’€™s going to come a point where we’€™re going to need you and obviously we did last game.”

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Jordan Caron, Shawn Thornton,
Patrice Bergeron absent from Bruins practice 04.24.12 at 11:47 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

WILMINGTON — The Bruins took the ice at Ristuccia Arena Tuesday for what may be their last practice of the season. All players were present with the exception 0f Patrice Bergeron and Adam McQuaid, the latter of whom remains out after not practicing yet this postseason. The B’s will host the Capitals in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals on Wednesday night.

With Bergeron not on the ice, Jordan Caron wore a gold sweater and skated on the second line. Joe Corvo (lower-body) skated after missing Sunday’s Game 6, but didn’t appear to be among the Bruins’ top six defensemen in practice. The lines were as follows:

Milan LucicDavid KrejciTyler Seguin

Brad MarchandRich Peverley – Jordan Caron

Benoit Pouliot – Chris KellyBrian Rolston

Daniel PailleGregory CampbellShawn Thornton

Zdeno CharaDennis Seidenberg

Andrew FerenceJohnny Boychuk

Greg Zanon – Mike Mottau

(Andrew Bodnarchuk – Joe Corvo)

Tim Thomas

Tuukka Rask

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Jordan Caron, Patrice Bergeron,
Thoughts on the Bruins’ new lines 04.20.12 at 11:03 pm ET
By   |  5 Comments

Claude Julien has changed his lines an uncharacteristic number of times this postseason, but his latest work is more drastic than perhaps any of the tinkering he’s done this season.

Out of the top six are Tyler Seguin and Brad Marchand. Seguin skated with the third line in Friday’s practice, while Brad Marchand was back to the Merlot Line with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton.

Marchand began last season on the fourth line before moving up to Patrice Bergeron‘s line mid-season and never looking back. After finishing second on the Bruins with 28 goals in the regular season, he’s been among the many B’s who have opened the postseason with rather uninspired play.

Here are what the lines were in Friday’s practice, according to reports:

Milan LucicDavid KrejciBrian Rolston
Daniel PaillePatrice BergeronRich Peverley
Benoit Pouliot – Chris KellyTyler Seguin/Jordan Caron
Brad Marchand – Gregory CampbellShawn Thornton

“Making line changes, that’€™s a part of trying to find solutions and it’€™s as simple as that,” Julien told reporters after Friday’s practice. “You’€™ve got to mix up guys who are not getting the results that we’€™d like to, so you’€™re trying to make changes that will maybe spark that part of our game.”

Here are some thoughts on the new lines for the Bruins:

– Not one line is the same as it was when the postseason began. The most radically changed trio is Bergeron’s, as Rich Peverley played only parts of the last two games with Bergeron, while Daniel Paille makes the jump from the fourth line.

– Julien obviously did this hoping that he can wake up some of his snoozing superstars. The top two lines in each game have gone scoreless thus far this series, as the team has had to rely on bottom-six forwards primarily for their scoring.

– While Seguin has been one of the Bruins’ worst players this postseason, taking him away from Bergeron is a risk. Seguin has underachieved in the past when playing on lower lines, but perhaps Chris Kelly and Benoit Pouliot — two of Boston’s better forwards this series — can get him going.

– The Bruins are deep enough that they can be tied in a series through four games despite the fact that their best forwards have been kept off the score sheet, but the Bruins really need to get something out of David Krejci. If Krejci repeats his first-round performance from last postseason (one assist), the B’s could be in trouble. Remember, he was having difficulty generating points against Carey Price in the first round a year ago. This is Braden Holtby, and the Bruins still haven’t consistently tested him for three periods.

– The Bruins should try to get Jordan Caron into the lineup, but for whom? As bad as Seguin was in the first three games before looking a little better on Thursday, scratching your regular-season leader in points should be out of the question. Caron brings a strong two-way game and had a stretch of eight points (four goals, four assists) in six games in March.

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Brad Marchand, David Krejci, Jordan Caron
Claude Julien hopeful Johnny Boychuk (knee) will play in Game 1 04.12.12 at 1:17 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Bruins coach Claude Julien would only say he “hopes” defenseman Johnny Boychuk will be in the lineup Thursday night in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals against the Capitals.

Based on this week, it would appear that Boychuk should be ready to return after missing the last two games of the regular season with a sprained knee. He participated in Thursday’s morning skate, marking the fourth straight day he’s been on the ice with the team. In practices and line drills, Boychuk has played on the second pairing with Andrew Ference.

Julien would not reveal the healthy scratch among forwards, but it should be either Jordan Caron or Daniel Paille, as the two have shared the left wing on the fourth line this week in practice.

Adam McQuaid (upper-body) and Tuukka Rask (abdomen/groin) will not dress. Anton Khudobin will serve as the team’s backup to Tim Thomas.

Here are the Bruins’ lines:

Milan Lucic ‘€“ David Krejci ‘€“ Rich Peverley
Brad Marchand ‘€“ Patrice Bergeron ‘€“ Tyler Seguin
Benoit Pouliot ‘€“ Chris Kelly ‘€“ Brian Rolston
Daniel Paille/Jordan Caron ‘€“ Gregory Campbell ‘€“ Shawn Thornton

Zdeno Chara ‘€“ Dennis Seidenberg
Andrew Ference ‘€“ Johnny Boychuk
Greg Zanon ‘€“ Joe Corvo

Tim Thomas
Anton Khudobin

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Claude Julien, Daniel Paille, Johnny Boychuk
Johnny Boychuk, Tuukka Rask present for first postseason practice 04.09.12 at 10:48 am ET
By   |  2 Comments

WILMINGTON — The Bruins held their first practice of the postseason Monday at Ristuccia Arena. Johnny Boychuk (knee) and Tuukka Rask (abdomen/groin) were both present for the skate, while Adam McQuaid (eye) was missing.

The lines are as follows:

Milan LucicDavid KrejciRich Peverley
Brad MarchandPatrice BergeronTyler Seguin
Benoit Pouliot – Chris KellyBrian Rolston
Daniel PailleGregory CampbellShawn Thornton

Jordan Caron served as the extra forward on the Campbell line. One could assume the final spot in the lineup will come down to Caron and Paille.

Boychuk took regular turns when the Bruins did line rushes early in the skate. Rask was moving around well, taking shots as one of three goaltenders on the ice. Tim Thomas and Anton Khudobin are the other two, as Marty Turco is ineligible because he signed after the trade deadline.

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Adam McQuaid, Johnny Boychuk, Jordan Caron
Bruins finally win two in a row, defeat Sabres 03.08.12 at 9:29 pm ET
By   |  2 Comments

It took the Bruins long enough, but they finally won their second game in a row thanks to Thursday’s 3-1 win over the Sabres. The victory marked the first time in 26 games that the B’s have won back-to-back contests.

Jason Pominville gave the Sabres the lead in the first period when he beat Tim Thomas with a rocket over the veteran netminder’s glove. Gregory Campbell tied the game in the second, redirecting a Shawn Thornton slap shot past Buffalo starter Jhonas Enroth. Johnny Boychuk gave the B’s the lead in the third period with his fourth goal of the season, with David Krejci providing insurance at 15:52.

Thomas made 19 saves on 20 shots faced. The game was the seventh consecutive contest in which Thomas has played.

The Bruins will host the Capitals Saturday as they go for their — get this — third straight win.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

Claude Julien called for more secondary scoring after Saturday’s loss to the Islanders, and for the third straight game since, he got it. After Jordan Caron dominated Sunday and Tuesday as a third-liner (three goals, two assists over the two games), it was the fourth line that chipped in with the equalizer in the second period. A Buffalo turnover left the puck waiting for Thornton to fire on not, and Campbell got a piece of it to tie the game. The goal was Campbell’s seventh of the season.

— Speaking of Caron, Julien switched Caron and Brian Rolston, putting Caron with Brad Marchand and Patrice Bergeron on the second line and Rolston with Chris Kelly and Benoit Pouliot. Rolston hasn’t made enough of a statement to earn top-six minutes since coming over in a trade from the Islanders last week, and it’s good for Julien to reward Caron for his improved play of late.

In picking up the assist on Boychuk’s goal, Caron extended his point streak to three games. The 21-year-old has three goals and three assists over his last three contests.

— The B’s new top line of David Krejci, Milan Lucic and Tyler Seguin has produced at least one goal in all five games since Julien put the trio together. Krejci has five goals over the last five games, while Seguin has four and Lucic has one. Some quick arithmetic shows that the members of the line have totaled 10 goals over their last five contests.

— The Bruins outscored their opponent in the second period for the third consecutive game. As has been well-documented, the Bruins have not been a good second-period team over the difficult stretch they’ve found themselves in since mid-January, but they have outscored their opponents 6-2 in the second over the last three games.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

Greg Zanon was made a healthy scratch for the first time since debuting with the B’s last week. Julien spoke highly of Zanon Thursday morning, calling him “sturdy” for the Bruins in his first four games with the Bruins, but the truth is that Zanon’s had a rough go of it since his debut. Zanon impressed in his first game with the B’s last Thursday, handling everything that was thrown his way and adapting to new partners as the team twice went to a five-man rotation. Since then, he’s had a rough time for the Bruins, having multiple flubs in front of Tim Thomas‘ net, knocking a puck in and posting a minus-4 rating over his last three games. He was one of just two Bruins (Thornton being the other) to have a minus rating (minus-1) in Tuesday’s 5-4 win over the Maple Leafs.

Mike Mottau played in Zanon’s place, skating on pairing with Adam McQuaid.

— Bergeron and Marchand have both gone the last six games without a goal. The second line is one that’s effective for its prowess in all three zones, but the B’s need two of their better forwards in Bergeron and Marchand to get going.

Read More: David Krejci, Johnny Boychuk, Jordan Caron, Tim Thomas
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines