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Bruins send Malcolm Subban, Zane McIntyre to Providence, return early draft picks to junior clubs 09.27.15 at 3:15 pm ET
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Malcolm Subban

Malcolm Subban

The Bruins have made another round of cuts, most notably sending goaltenders Zane McIntyre and Malcolm Subban to Providence.

Also sent to Providence were Noel Acciari, Chris Breen, Anthony Camara, Brandon DeFazio, Justin Hickman, Zane McIntyre and Ben Sexton. The B’€™s sent first-round picks Jakub Zboril (Saint John of the QMJHL) and Jake DeBrusk (Swift Current of the WHL), as well as second-rounder (Tri-City of the WHL) back to their junior teams. Fifteenth overall pick Zach Senyshyn was sent back to his OHL club (Sault Ste. Marie) earlier in the week.

Free agent defenseman Ben Youds was released from camp and will attend Providence’€™s training camp.

Though McIntyre and Subban could still be brought back up (a la Ryan Spooner last training camp), it would appear that Jeremy Smith and Jonas Gustavsson are now the finalists to be Tuukka Rask‘s backup.

Read More: Malcolm Subban, Zane McIntyre,
Malcolm Subban off to good start on road to redemption 09.22.15 at 11:18 pm ET
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Malcolm Subban

Malcolm Subban

Malcolm Subban had just one opportunity to make a National Hockey League impression last season, and the resulting impression was not a good one.

After stopping all 17 pucks he faced on Tuesday night at TD Garden, Subban improved his chances at getting some redemption opportunities in 2015-2016.

It was only half of a pre-season game, of course, but it’€™s a start.

“It felt pretty good,”€ the Boston goaltending prospect said of his 29:43 of ice time in a Bruins 2-1 overtime victory against the Washington Capitals. “To be honest, [I was] maybe a little nervous at the start because from the start of [training] camp up until this game I didn’€™t feel at my best in practice. I didn’€™t feel too good like I was tracking the puck [well] but thankfully it all came together tonight and I thought I played pretty well.”

Subban, 21, looked focused throughout his period-and-a-half of action, with perhaps his best save coming on a second period penalty-kill deflection and ensuing skirmish in front.

“I thought Malcolm was really good at times there where he was flooded with some shots,” said Bruins coach Claude Julien. “He made a couple of big saves.”

Boston’€™s first-round selection (24th overall) of the 2012 draft, Subban made his NHL debut last year on February 20 at Scottrade Center in St. Louis and gave up goals on three straight shots in the second period before being pulled. It sent Subban back to the drawing board this offseason, with the help of goaltending coach Bob Essensa.

“In that game, I felt all the goals I was way too deep on,” Subban said. “€œEven though some of them might have been a tip or a screen, I felt I was too deep and didn’€™t give myself a chance to make the save. It wasn’€™t just that game, it was in the AHL, too. I felt the goals that were scored I was too deep. I’€™ve worked on that with Bob. That’€™s the biggest thing I need to work on, using my speed a bit more.”

Subban’€™s athleticism has always been one of his biggest assets, and he’€™s learning when to unleash it.

“€œI felt I could have played the puck a lot better,” Subban said of his Tuesday performance, admitting that he tends to be critical of himself after games. “I was challenging too early, so by the time they started to rim the puck I was way too far out and couldn’€™t get to it. [But] I felt I had pretty good rebound control. One squirted out in the first but other than that I was putting them into the mesh or the corner, or smothering them, so not too much was going on in front which helps the ‘€˜D’€™ out a lot. It helps us get the puck out and not be trapped in our zone.”

The battle for Tuukka Rask‘€™s backup will continue throughout the next few weeks of Bruins’€™ camp, with Jeremy Smith, Zane McIntyre and Jonas Gustavsson his competition. Although Subban is aware of the job that is up for grabs, he’€™s trying to stay focused on himself.

“You look around too much, you forget you’€™ve got to do the same job,”€ Subban said. “€œI’€™m trying to play my game. Obviously it’€™s a great competition for the guys to push you, knowing that these guys are competing for the same job, but at the same time we’€™re all trying to help each other.”

And if he wins the job, he’€™s ready for the redemption story to begin.

“€œIt’€™s the mentality you’€™ve got to have, whether it comes or not,” said Subban. “You’€™ve got to be ready. I felt I had that chance last year and wasn’€™t ready so, I’€™m looking forward to this year and made the necessary adjustments and hopefully I can make a better opportunity.”

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Providence Bruins headed for Game 5 of first-round series with Hartford 04.28.15 at 9:24 pm ET
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Malcolm Subban

Malcolm Subban

PROVIDENCE — The Providence Bruins’€™ first-round series with the Hartford Wolf Pack will come down to a decisive Game 5, as the Baby B’€™s suffered a 2-1 Game 4 loss at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center Tuesday to leave the series knotted at two games apiece.

Seth Griffith scored his second goal in as many games as he fired a shot from the point past Yann Danis during a third-period man advantage, but it wasn’€™t enough on a night in which Providence squandered five of its six power plays.

Mat Bodie scored Hartford’€™s first goal, scoring off the rush in the second period following the expiration of Providence’€™s fourth power play of the game. Bodie’€™s shot, which came at 3:06 of the second, was just the fourth shot that Malcolm Subban faced on the night. Providence’€™s early power plays allowed them to outshoot Hartford, 8-2, in the first period. While that prevented Hartford from scoring early, it also left Providence’s goaltender cold.

“It’s pretty tough,” Subban said of not facing shots early. “You’re not really in the game and you’re trying to get in the game and they get a three-on-two. It’s kind of tough. Obviously the first goal, maybe if I’m in the game I make the save. It’s not that I can’t make it when I’m not in the game, it’s just it’s a really tough save to try to get into the game on.”

After a good chance for the Bruins during a late second-period power play, Joe Morrow took a cross-checking penalty to leave the sides playing four-on-four late in the period and give Hartford an abbreviated power play to open the third period. Less than a minute after that power play ended, Tyler Brown tipped a point shot past Subban to give Hartford a two-goal lead.

Minutes later, Providence forward Zach Phillips was assessed a double-minor for butt-ending, forcing the B’€™s to spend the next four minutes shorthanded. Providence survived the double-minor and eventually cashed on its next power play with Griffith’€™s goal with 7:06 remaining in regulation.

Providence was unable to find the equalizer in the final minutes, pulling Subban with about 90 seconds to play but failing to tie it.

“We’re going to put this behind us,” Providence coach Bruce Cassidy said after the game. “It wasn’t awful; it’s just we had the chance to finish the job and we didn’t. It’s that simple.”

David Pastrnak did not play in the game. He left Sunday’€™s Game 3 with a lower-body injury suffered on a hit from defenseman Dylan McIlrath. Pastrtnak’s status for Friday’s game is still unclear, Cassidy said.

Claude Julien was among those on hand, watching alongside assistant coach Doug Jarvis. Julien is still Boston’€™s head coach, but that could change once the Bruins hire their next general manager. Assistant GMs Don Sweeney and John Ferguson were also in attendance.

The Baby B’s finished the game with a 29-17 edge in shots on goal. Game 5 will be played Friday in Hartford.

Read More: Malcolm Subban, Seth Griffith,
5 things we learned: David Krejci injured, Malcolm Subban pulled and Bruins could be toast 02.20.15 at 10:37 pm ET
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Both Malcolm Subban and David Krejci left Friday’€™s game in the second period. Subban’€™s night was disappointing. Krejci’€™s could end up being the final nail in the coffin for the 2014-15 Bruins.

Krejci left the ice and needed help down the tunnel after colliding with Alexander Steen at the blue line in the second period. He did not return to the game. His injury appeared to be of the lower-body variety.

The injury came amidst a three-goal stretch for St. Louis to open the period and chase Subban, who was making his NHL debut, from the game. Subban was brought back into the game in the final minutes of the third period with the Blues holding a 5-1 lead, which would stand as the game’€™s final score (box).

Should Krejci’€™s injury cost him significant time, this season is toast for the Bruins. If it costs him any time, Boston’€™s chances of piecing things together and holding down a playoff spot (they have just a one-point lead over the Panthers for the last Wild Card spot; Florida has a game in hand) still take a big hit.

In losing Friday’€™s game, the Bruins have lost the first four games of their current road trip. They have lost six straight games (0-2-4).

Here are four more things we learned Friday.


Subban faced only three shots in the first period. He let the next three in.

Whether as a result of rookie jitters, the fact that he was a 21-year-old goalie playing in an NHL game or anything else, Subban struggled mightily with his glove. Petteri Lindbohm’€™s slapshot in the first minute of the second period went off Subban’€™s glove and in, while Alex Pietrangelo’€™s shot from the left circle snuck under the netminder’€™s glove. T.J. Oshie beat Subban glove-side high from a tough angle less than a minute after Pietrangelo’€™s goal, giving the Blue three goals on three shots in 4:21.

Subban was not happy as he left the game, slamming his stick down as he reached the bench.


Tuukka Rask didn’€™t look much happier as he got ready to take the ice following St. Louis’€™ third goal. Rask tossed a chair down the tunnel, looking more dejected than angry as he did so.

With Friday’€™s game, Rask has now played in 16 straight games and 25 of the Bruins’€™ last 26. He allowed a pair of goals, the first of which was on a St. Louis power play and the second of which came on a 2-on-1.

This is not good for the Bruins. It would be one thing if the Bruins had to ride Rask to victories while they worked things out solidified their postseason position. Yet by playing Rask and playing as poorly in front of him as they have, they’€™re both wearing down their No. 1 goalie and making the possibility of missing the playoffs very realistic.


The Bruins played a strong first period, which despite their struggles this season shouldn’€™t have come as a huge surprise given that they’€™ve played well against the Blues in recent seasons.

Part of that was probably the fact that Subban was in net. When a team knows that it doesn’€™t have a sure thing like Rask behind them, it naturally tends to tighten up and limit chances. That was the case when they held St. Louis without a shot until 12:14 into the period. The B’s took a 1-0 lead into the intermission thanks to a Brad Marchand goal, but things unraveled quickly.


The Bruins only got one power play in Wednesday’€™s loss and they scored on it. A new-look first unit played about a minute and a half and scored, so the second unit was not revealed.

That finally happened Friday, and the changes included Zdeno Chara moving back to the point after playing in front of the net since the beginning of last season. Chara and Reilly Smith manned the points on the second unit, with Milan Lucic, David Pastrnak and Carl Soderberg up front.

The first unit remained Torey Krug, Dougie Hamilton, Patrice Bergeron, Krejci and Loui Eriksson.

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Malcolm Subban, Brian Ferlin to make NHL debuts, Daniel Paille to sit amidst Bruins’ lineup shuffle at 1:27 pm ET
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Malcolm Subban

Malcolm Subban

Malcolm Subban reportedly was the first goaltender off the ice in Friday’€™s morning skate, indicating the 2012 first-round pick will make his NHL debut against the Blues. Right wing Brian Ferlin also will make his NHL debut.

Subban, who is in his second recall of the season, spent a four-game stretch with the B’€™s earlier this month but did not play. He was recalled again this week, with the B’€™s opting against starting him Wednesday against the Oilers. Despite starting Tuukka Rask in the game, the B’€™s still lost to Edmonton in a shootout.

Should Subban play the entire game Friday, it will break up a stretch of 15 straight games played for Rask, who has also played in 24 of the Bruins’€™ last 25 games.

Bruins coach Claude Julien told reporters that both Ferlin and Jordan Caron will play Friday. Both players took line rushes with Gregory Campbell on the fourth line in morning skate, according to the Boston Herald. As such, Daniel Paille and Craig Cunningham will be healthy scratches.

According to Steve Conroy of the Boston Herald, the lines in morning skate were as follows:


For more Bruins news, visit

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5 things we learned as Bruins play Tuukka Rask over Malcolm Subban, still lose to Oilers in shootout 02.19.15 at 1:09 am ET
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The Bruins opted against starting Malcolm Subban Wednesday night, further underscoring the importance placed on getting two points against the second-worst team in the NHL.

They still lost.

After coming back from a 3-1 deficit in the second period, the Bruins held even with the Oilers through the third period and overtime before losing in a 12-round shootout that saw Boston fail to score once. Tuukka Rask finally surrendered the shootout’€™s only goal to Martin Marincin on the 24th overall attempt.

The loss was Boston’€™s fifth straight (0-3-2) and sixth in the last seven games (1-4-2). The Bruins have two more games on their current road trip, as they’€™ll play the Blues Friday and the Blackhawks Sunday. Rask has now played in 24 of the Bruins’€™ last 25 games, so the Bruins, entering must-win mode each night, may face more tough decisions regarding whether to risk burning out their best player.

Here are four more things we learned Wednesday night:


Claude Julien hasn’€™t been afraid to tinker with his forward lines, and on Wednesday that extended to the power play.

When Andrew Ference went off for tripping Brad Marchand late in the first period, Julien sent out a unit that featured Dougie Hamilton and Torey Krug at the points, with David Krejci and Patrice Bergeron up front and Loui Eriksson in front of the net. The group stayed out there for all 91 seconds of the power play until Eriksson tipped a Hamilton shot past Ben Scrivens. The goal was the group’€™s sixth shot on goal of the power play.

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Read More: Malcolm Subban, Tuukka Rask,
Bruins shouldn’t make Malcolm Subban a trade chip yet 02.17.15 at 7:36 pm ET
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Malcolm Subban

Malcolm Subban

If this callup for Malcolm Subban is a “showcase,” it had better not have anything to do with this season.

Subban is a goaltending prospect, which means you can flip a coin as to whether he’€™ll be a Vezina winner or just another guy, but he’€™s a highly regarded prospect nonetheless. Tuukka Rask is signed at a very reasonable $7 million for six more years after this season and Subban will be NHL-ready before that. For a team that’€™s set at goaltender, he’€™s a great chip to have if they are so inclined to move him.

But not for a two-month rental. If the Bruins want teams to have some video of Subban in case they talk trade in the offseason, fine. Airplanes exist and scouts are allowed to watch AHL games, but sure. By all means. Let teams watch him play in an NHL game against the second-worst team in the NHL (and one of the nine that scores less than the Bruins).

We’€™ve already outlined that the Bruins should absolutely not move anything of significant value at the trade deadline. They should take their chances as is in a weak Eastern Conference this postseason with the understanding that this has turned into a transition year. If guys start performing like their usual selves in April and May, they’€™re capable of beating any Eastern Conference team that doesn’€™t a C and an H on their sweaters, but they’€™re better off waiting until the cap goes up and they aren’€™t paying nearly $5 million in overages before they go out and start trading good young guys.

What would the Bruins even move Subban for this season? The Sabres reportedly asked for him in exchange for Chris Stewart, which they must have known was a ridiculous request. Stewart, an inconsistent right wing whose motivation probably hasn’€™t matched his talent over the last three years, might be the type of addition the Bruins should make at the deadline, but only because he realistically should only cost a mid-round pick and/or a mid-level prospect.

The team’€™s needs (if they go for it, which again, they probably shouldn’€™t) are a top-four defenseman, a potential first-line right wing and anything that can fix the fourth line. Subban maybe gets you one of those things in this seller’€™s market. Unless there’€™s an affordable player at one of those positions that’€™s controllable beyond this season, there’€™s really no point in using such a good piece now while the prices are high.

Playing Subban Wednesday could bring something the Bruins need as much as anything else: a win. You’€™d certainly hope the Bruins would be able to beat the Oilers on any night anyway, but the Bruins have been positively dreadful in front of Tuukka Rask the last four games. Playing a backup goaltender can be an effective means of getting a team to pay better attention defensively, and right now Subban might be better than Niklas Svedberg, who has been pulled from two of his last three starts.

Subban might not be a big part of the Bruins’€™ 2014-15 season, but he can impact future ones far more than he would by fetching a rental over the next couple months.

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