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Second period summary: Bruins vs. Sabres – Game 1 04.15.10 at 8:46 pm ET
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Maybe the Bruins power play is starting to come back to life.

They scored one in the regular season finale against Washington to break an 0 for 23 funk and then turn around to score on their first opportunity of the postseason after a Toni Lydman cross checking penalty. Mark Recchi found the back of the net off a rebound in the low slot from a Zdeno Chara slap shot from the high slot. The play was set up by a nice touch pass by defenseman Matt Hunwick on the point to give Chara the one-timer that split the Sabres forward penalty killers. Patrice Bergeron did not register and assist on the play, but he should have as his tangling play in front of Ryan Miller helped keep the puck loose from Buffalo defenseman Henrik Tallinder long enough for Recchi to find it and put it home to tie the game at 9:30.

Boston absolutely lived in the Sabres’ zone for most of the period but, outside of the power play strike, did not have much to show for it except a bunch of shots and Recchi’s goal. Then, the moment that the Bruins let their foot off the gas pedal for a minute, Buffalo struck.

It was captain Craig Rivet that did the damage with a back pass assist from Tim Kennedy. Rivet came down the right wing from the point with a head of steam and let go a slap shot at the top of the circle that whittled its way through traffic passed Rask at 14:10.

Boston had another power play opportunity late in the period when Thomas Vanek went for tripping Milan Lucic flying through the neutral zone at 16:28. The Sabres penalty kill was more effective this time around to preserve their 2-1 lead heading into the third.

Boston outshot Buffalo 24 to 8 on the period and lead the game 33 to 20.

Read More: Buffalo Sabres, Craig Rivet, Mark Recchi, Ryan Miller
Bruins foil Sabres, take step closer to playoffs 04.08.10 at 9:35 pm ET
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Summary — Boston took a big step towards the playoffs on Thursday with a 3-1 win over the Sabres at TD Garden. Boston now leads the idle Rangers by three points for the final playoff spot as each team has two games in the regular season.

Tuukka Rask got the start for the Bruins and was his usual solid self in turning away 31 shots for the victory. The Bruins may have thought they had dodged a bullet when Buffalo started backup goaltender Patrick Lalime over All-Star Ryan Miller but he backstop was solid and contributed to Boston’s goal-scoring frustration with a steady 31 saves in the loss.

Dennis Wideman got the game-winner for Boston at 1:59 in the third period with a blast from the point that had eyes through Lalime towards the back of the net. It was Wideman’s sixth of the year.

The Bruins found a familiar refrain at 11:00 in the first period. Wideman could not control the puck off the wall in neutral ice and lost it for a breakaway by Derek Roy. The defenseman could not recover and Roy had an easy time picking his spot, high glove side, against Rask for the opening goal of the game.

Boston came back early in the second. Miroslav Satan found himself in a small scrum on the half wall in the Bruins offensive zone against two Sabres and lost control of the puck but got enough stick on it to keep it live. David Krejci circled around from behind the goal line to keep the puck in play, hit a touch pass to back to Satan who skated into Lalime’s crease and put a backhander home at 2:15.

Zdeno Chara [Mark Recchi] gave the Bruins the breathing-room goal late in the third period on a one-time blast from the corner on a pass from Milan Lucic at the left point that deflected off of Recchi and  overpowered Lalime at to make it 3-1 at 16:35.

Three Stars

Miroslav Satan — The veteran forward tied the game in the second period with his ninth of the season for the Bruins.

Derek Roy — The Sabres center was pesky presence all night and was rewarded for his efforts in the first period when he plundered Wideman and took his booty to the net to beat Rask for the opening goal of the game.

Tuukka Rask — the statistical league leading netminder did his thing in shutting down the Sabres to keep the Bruins in the game and give them a position to claim points to be applied to their playoff pursuit.

Turning Point — When Wideman redeemed himself early in the third. He stood up a little short of the right point and time his shot perfectly with the screening body of Blake Wheeler to catch Lalime in a blind moment for his sixth of the season and game-winning goal.

Key Play — A lot of good Rask saves to choose from. One of the most important was a point blank shot from Sabres’ forward Tyler Ennis that was unleashed two feet in front of the crease that Rask stoned cold with a little more than a minute to play in the second period. Had Ennis been able to score and Buffalo entered the third period with a goal lead, the dynamic of the final frame would have been much different as Boston would have had a more aggressive (riskier) offensive attack as opposed to playing tighter defense with the lead.

UPDATE — There was a scoring change on the Bruins third goal after the game with the tally being awarded to forward Mark Recchi on a deflection from Chara’s shot. The goal was Recchi’s 18th of the year.

Read More: Blake Wheeler, David Krejci, Dennis Wideman, Derek Roy
Recchi nominated for Masterton Trophy 04.07.10 at 1:21 pm ET
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Mark Recchi has been nominated by Boston chapter of the Professional Hockey Writers’ Association for the 2010 Bill Masterton Trophy, presented to the player who exhibits “to a high degree the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey.”

“It is a great honor, obviously. I kept on plugging along here, and it also means I am old,” Recchi said. “There have been some great players who have been awarded this, and it is just a great honor to be able to play in the NHL still, and I love it and it is nice to be recognized.”

The 42-year-old Recchi has played in all 79 games for the Bruins this season, collecting 17 goals and 25 assists for 42 points. He has gradually moved up the NHL’s all-time scoring and games played lists. He is now ninth all time in games played (1,569), 22nd in goals scored (562), 17th in assists (922) and 13th in points (1,484).

With all his accomplishments, Recchi said that he is leaning toward playing next year as opposed to going into retirement.

“I definitely am leaning toward the other way than I am towards retirement,” Recchi said. “I am still having a lot of fun, and this time of year coming up here is what we ultimately play for and I am looking forward to it.”

Recchi has been a dressing room leader for the Bruins since being acquired at the trade deadline last season, and the young Bruins appreciate having him around. Milan Lucic, who is half Recchi’s age, knows how important it is to have a veteran like Recchi available to him.

“Yeah, there is no question that he should be up for that award,” Lucic said. “You know, he comes to the rink and works hard every day. There are not a lot of 42-year-olds who can move like him, but he is great and he is a great leader. Definitely as a young guy he is someone you can look up to and even if you have a question about anything just someone you can talk to and he is there for you all the time. Congrats to him, and he has a great chance to win.”

Lucic said that the shock of playing with a future Hall of Fame member has worn off a little bit since Recchi’s arrival, but it is still great to be around the elder forward as he climbs various all-time lists.

“It was more so [a sense of awe] when he first came here, but obviously this year when he is moving up the goal ladder, it is fun to see, it is cool to see,” Lucic said. “One day when I am done playing I can say that I played with Mark Recchi, so that will be something cool to say.”

Bruins coach Claude Julien has appreciated having Recchi around as a player as much for his play on the ice as well his ability to help the young players along, especially guys such as Lucic and Blake Wheeler, who should be able to make decent livings in the NHL camped out in front of the net, Recchi’s forte.

“Well, we have talked a lot about that this year and rightfully so,” Julien said. “He has led us on the ice without a doubt, and obviously his experience in different situations in the dressing room and with our captain and assistants, he has been a good player that way as well. It is hard for young guys to not want to follow when they see a guy that has been around that long lead by example. His work ethic and commitment, I can’t say enough about what he has brought to our team this year.”

Read More: Mark Recchi,
Recchi doesn’t see everybody there 04.02.10 at 9:50 am ET
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After another frustrating home loss and the Bruins’ second straight game without a regulation goal, B’s coach Claude Julien and team leader Mark Recchi openly questioned the team’s desire and heart.

“We have to find ways to win these games,” Recchi said. “We did in New Jersey because we had everyone in. Tonight, we didn’t have everybody there, so the results are there.”

Julien added that he was frustrated to see the team’s best shooter, Michael Ryder, finish with zero shots on goal. “There’s no doubt we have some players who could’ve been much better for us tonight,” Julien said. “Ryder is probably our best shooter and ends up with zero shots. Those are the things we needed from those players.”

After the game, Julien said the ‘push’ has to come from within the dressing room.

And at 42 years young, it was Recchi pushing the hardest.

“We had a lot of good chances and we just didn’€™t score,” Recchi said. “I mean, we can’€™t ask for much more, effort-wise. I still don’€™t think we had 20 guys tonight, but you know, the guys that were going were generating a lot of opportunities and you got to put those in. We need ‘€“ like I said, this time of year, you need 20 guys, regardless, so that’€™s a little bit of a disappointment, but we definitely controlled the game and played the right way and we should have won this one.”

Recchi saw a Florida Panthers team that, while not in the playoff chase, would come in and play a conservative, hard-checking style. And, when the visitors went up, 1-0, in the first period, that’s exactly what the Bruins got.

“They played hard,” Recchi said. “We knew they were going to play hard. I mean, we’€™ve had some tough games against them this year and, you know, if anybody watches the games and I don’€™t know, I’€™m not sure how many guys do, but they play hard. They compete. They haven’€™t quit. They’€™ve got some young players that want to play well and you know, they’€™ve got some, obviously some leaders over there who are not letting those young guys quit and I don’€™t know if we underestimated them or not, but this time of year, I don’€™t think you should underestimate anybody.

“I’€™ve been on the other end where you’€™re spoiling opportunities and there’€™s nothing more enjoyable when you know you’€™re five games away from the end of the season and if you can hurt somebody’€™s chances of making the playoffs, that’€™s what you play for and that’€™s what those guys are playing for right now.”

Recchi was trying so hard on the ice, he thought he was rewarded midway through the second period when he re-directed a shot and raised his stick a bit prematurely, almost willing the puck in the net when nothing else was working.

“Yeah, I thought it went in, but obviously, it didn’€™t, but yeah, I thought it went in,” Recchi admitted. “We had a lot of good opportunities. Their goalie [Scott Clemmensen] made some good saves. You’€™ve got to give him some credit too, but, you know, a lot of pucks ‘€“ he’€™s a big kid and he played big, and a lot of pucks hit him and we weren’€™t able to capitalize.”

But again, it comes down to having everyone in and Recchi made it clear Thursday night that, with just five games left, that’s something he expects.

“In a game like this, if you have 20 guys, we don’€™t lose, and we still miss,” he said. “[In] New Jersey, we had 20 guys, and we win. It’€™s no secret this time of year. The teams that have guys that are ‘€“ and we talked about this after the last game ‘€“ you might not feel good, but this time of year, chances are you don’€™t feel great but, you know, you have to dig deep down and do it for your teammates, do it for yourself. You have to find ways.

“If you’€™re a goal scorer and you’€™re not scoring goals, you got to be physical; and you got to play great defensively, and if you’€™re a physical guy, then you know, you got to chip in at times, so there’€™s a whole bunch of factors that play into this and I think we have to, with five games remaining, I think we shouldn’€™t have to be talking about it, but the results are there. [If] we don’€™t have 20 guys, we don’€™t win, and [if] we do, we win.”

Read More: Bruins, Claude Julien, Mark Recchi, NHL
Bruins fall flat in loss to Panthers 04.01.10 at 9:21 pm ET
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Summary — The Bruins had that familiar feeling on Thursday as they had trouble finishing chances against the Florida Panthers in a game they lost 1-0 at TD Garden. Tuukka Rask took the loss for Boston on the night with 19 saves while Scott Clemmensen got the shutout for the Panthers in turning away 36 Bruins shots and plethora of opportunities.

The Panthers got on the board in the first period when Keith Ballard pinched the slot with space in front of Rask and went underneath the goaltender’s pads to give Florida a 1-0 lead at 7:15 in the first period. The goal ended a 121:42 shutout streak by Rask over parts of four games.

Boston knocked on the door repeatedly in the second period with 17 shots and two power play opportunities but the Bruins could not beat Clemmensen as every puck that came close was turned away, inches wide or above the net and the game entered the third period with the Panthers still up by the lone goal. Both Milan Lucic and Mark Recchi thought at one point they had scored goals only to see the end result of the puck on the wrong side of the net.

One of Boston’s best chances to score was on a short-handed opportunity in the third period when Blake Wheeler found himself on a 2-on-1 break with David Krejci following him on the right wing. Wheeler ended up waiting too long to make the decision to shoot or pass and put and ineffective tip on the edge of the crease at 4:40.

Rask received the Bruins Seventh Player Award before the game as the player who “went above and beyond the call of duty and exceeded the expectations of Bruins fans during the season.”

Three Stars

Keith Ballard — The defenseman’s first period goal was the only scoring in the game. He also blocked a least a half dozen shots to help his goaltender keep the puck out of the net.

Scott Clemmensen — The former Boston College Eagle was good enough in net to keep the Bruins off the board and out of the win column with (#) saves.

Tuukka Rask — Even in a losing effort the Bruins net minder was solid in turning away the Panthers chances and keeping Boston in the game.

Turning Point – At 15:40 in the second penalty on a delayed penalty the Bruins Mark Recchi thought he had beat Clemmensen with a redirection. He went so far as to raise his hands and stick thinking that it went in but turned out to go wide right. Later in the period on the power play Milan Lucic did almost the same thing as he deflected a puck that went over the net, causing Clemmensen’s water bottle to stir in the process. Lucic raised his hands just as Recchi had but again the puck did not go into the net (though the officials did review Lucic’s tip).

Key Play – Keith Ballard pinched the slot in the first period after a Bruins flurry on the other end of the ice and caught the defense sleeping while the Boston forwards were not being aggressive on the back check. Given a few seconds right in front of a goaltender, most NHL players will take advantage of the situation and Ballard was no exception as he used Rask’s pads against him as he went up and underneath them for the first (and only) goal of the game.

Read More: Keith Ballard, Mark Recchi, Milan Lucic, Scott Clemmensen
Bruin’s shutout extinguishes Flames 03.27.10 at 3:33 pm ET
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Summary — The Bruins found their stroke on Saturday with a 5-0 victory over Calgary at a sold out matinee game at TD Garden. Tim Thomas got the start and the win with his fifth shutout of the year by stopping 31 shots. Miikka Kiprusoff took the loss for the Flames by allowing five goals on 29 shots before giving way to backup Vesa Toskala in the third period.

Boston broke out of its power play funk in a big way after entering the game on an 0-for-22 streak with its last man-advantage  goal coming on a Marco Sturm strike against the Maple Leafs on March 9. Dennis Seidenberg got the credit for snapping the streak at 14:08 in the first period after a Craig Conroy hooking call when he hit a one-timer from the high slot that had eyes to the top of the net for a 1-0 Bruins lead.

In the second period Boston had its way on the power play again. Conroy went back to the box for hooking at :31 which set up David Krejci for a wrist shot from the left circle at 1:29 that got through traffic and beat Kiprusoff high. Zdeno Chara got in on the mix after Rene Bourque took a goaltender interference call when he  plowed through Thomas at 4:34. Chara activated on the next series and took a feed from Krejci in the slot in front of Kiprusoff with enough time and space to choose the location of his wrist shot, high over the stick-side shoulder for the 3-0 lead.

Patrice Bergeron recorded his 17th goal of the season at 4:24 in the third period when he used Conroy as a deflector shield with a shot from the goal line that he put off the center’s knees to beat Kiprusoff. Mark Recchi would match Bergeron with his 17th of the year 1:31 later at 5:51 when he dove for a Sturm rebound to beat Kiprusoff and end the netminder’s night as Toskala came in to replace him.

Bruins’ defenseman Johnny Boychuk received a five-minute elbowing major and a game misconduct at 7:21 in the third when he went in for a hit on in the corner against Rene Bourque with his forearm/elbow raised high enough to catch the Flames’ forward flush across the face.

Three Stars

David Krejci — The center has been on fire of late with eight points (three goals, five assists) in his last five games. Scored the second power play goal and helped set up the third.

Zdeno Chara — The captain had his first multi-point game since a three-point effort on Dec. 23 against Atlanta with a power play goal and an assist. Chara now has six multi-point games for the season.

Tim Thomas — The reigning Vezina Trophey winner was solid for Boston in picking up his 16th win of the year with his fifth shutout.

Turning Point — Chara’s goal was the one that sent the Bruins on their way to a victory without looking back over their shoulders for pursuing Flames. He was set up on the power play by Milan Lucic and Krejci to the point where he could skate down the slot with space straight at Kiprusoff and pick his target for the 3-0 lead.

Key Play — Seidenberg’s strike in the first period broke what was basically and 0-for-March power play for the Bruins. He combined with to make Team Dennis with fellow defenseman Dennis Wideman as they shuffled the puck along the point in the first period to the point that Seidenberg had enough space to pull off a one-timer from the high slot at 14:08 that was heavy and had eyes to the back of the net.

Read More: David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg, Johnny Boychuk, Mark Recchi
First period summary: Bruins-Flames at 1:45 pm ET
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The Black and Gold faithful have not seen that in a while.

Boston broke its power play funk at 14:08 into the game with its first chance on the man-advantage. The penalty was set up by Mark Recchi who had a point-blank chance on Flames’ goaltender Miikka Kiprusoff and was hooked to the ground in the process by Craig Conroy. On the ensuing power play the Bruins cycled from the corner to the blue line where the double Dennis tandem of Seidenberg and Wideman exchanged the puck with Wideman turning it back to Seidenberg in the high slot for a one-time slap shot that had eyes all the way to the back of the net at 14:08.

The strike breaks the Bruins scoreless power play streak at 0-for-22. Their last man-advantage goal was a Marco Sturm second period strike on March 9 against the Maple Leafs.

Tim Thomas got the nod for the Bruins and was solid in the first period in shutting down the Flames 12 shots on goal. The Bruins have the edge in the shot department heading into the second with 14 total on Kiprusoff.

Defenseman Mark Stuart sustained some type of injury to his face in the final minute of the period and skated off the ice straight into the tunnel and the dressing room.

Read More: Dennis Seidenberg, Mark Recchi, Mark Stuart, Miikka Kiprusoff
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