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Transcript of Chiarelli on Dale & Holley 05.20.09 at 12:13 pm ET
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Q: I’m sure winning this award (NHL Executive of the Year) doesn’t feel like congratulations after the end of the season does it?

A: It’s a nice distinction but we’re still picking up pieces to a degree and looking to see how we’re going to face next year, but we have a bit of summer to work with and we’ll see where we go.

Q: How are you moving forward from that Game 7 defeat?

A: I’m not in a stage of denial. It happens, you have to deal with it. I’m still sour, so to speak, and without taking anything away from the Hurricanes, I believe that we were the better team and that we should’ve won. You can take all you want from it as far as being battle-tested, but our team has to learn to seize these opportunities. It’s painful. I don’t know when we will get over it, but we will.

Q: Why didn’t your team win the series?

A: I believe we were impacted a little bit by the layoff. You think about that after the series, after conducting my exit interviews with players, a lot of them brought that up. You just tend to slip over that period of time in practice. I think another part of it, maybe we underestimated them a little bit. We didn’t play as well in the first part of the series as we were capable of playing and we fell behind it and we couldn’t catch up. Look at Game 7. If we score once on a power play, we probably win that game. We were nervous on the power play. There was a lot of reasons, I think they just compiled and accumulated and helped us lose the series.

Q: How do you decide that 50 percent of one of your players is better than 100 percent of a replacement from Providence?

A: It’s a matter of talking with the doctors, talking with the player, seeing if there is future damage possible. Testing it out off the ice and on the ice. At the end of the day, you have to rely on what the player tells you. Chuck (Kobasew) had the ribs; he was banged up pretty good. For Phil (Kessel), he was dealing with the shoulder. It’s not scientific. You’ve got to rely on them to tell you what they can give you and see how it goes from day to day.

Q: Does it make you nervous that neither Krejci of Kessel will be available at the start of training camp?

A: A little bit, yeah it does. The fact that these guys are big contributors, we’ll be fine and we are getting Marco Sturm back but the proper thing is that these guys rehab it properly. You could miss a step in rehab and fall even further behind.

Q: How will those injuries impact their restricted free agency this offseason?

A: I know we will start dialogue and see where it goes. These are young players who will continue to improve and also will heal at a good clip. We have talked to them during the course of the year while they were injured about the future and I’m satisfied that these players will continue to grow and improve. There are a lot of ways to skin a cat here, and I think that (signing both Krejci and Kessel) is going to require some skinning. I don’t know where and I don’t know how.

Q: Is the room under the cap pretty tight for you guys?

A: It’s just going to be harder negotiations and harder choices. But I wouldn’t just focus on that. It could be a number of things that we could do. There’s going to be a crunch across the league. You see some of the things that the (Patriots) have had to do over the years and you go ‘Wow’. That may happen with us, and I know that will happen across the league. There’s going to be some of those ‘Wow’ moments and it’s the product of a cap system and a shrinking cap.

Q: Consider the possibility of bringing Mark Recchi back for next year?

A: Yes I have to consider it. He really stabilized the psyche of the team. He brought an element that we would like to have more of. The grindy goals, the tip-ins. How many net drives did he do over the course of the game? That’s an element that we want to improve on. I told Mark to let me sort some things out first and I would get back to him in short order to see what we can do. He was a good addition and I’m glad we acquired him.

Q: Have you watched Game 7 again?

A: No. I’ve seen that goal enough so it drives me crazy. You could hear a pin drop after they scored that goal in overtime. I wish we didn’t let it get to that point. Anything can happen in a Game 7. We shouldn’t have been in that position.

Q: Could you make a case that Walker should’ve been suspended for Game 7?

A: Yeah I’m sure you could. That was a disappointing situation and my inclination is to look at these things and rationalize them. I say my piece behind closed doors when we speak to the league and whatnot, and I was really disappointed in that result. Really disappointed that someone could be sucker-punched and not be sanctioned.

Q: What are the areas that you would like to improve on in the offseason?

A: I’d like to get a little more size up front. I tried to do that at the deadline and we got certain elements of that in Recchi. I’d still like to do that and I believe that it would help our team. You’d like to add a defenseman or a big forward along the way, that’s kind of a mini-wish list for now.

Q: How do the contracts work with accessible bonuses and things like that?

A: This year these bonuses became hard money. All those bonuses, that’s soft money and you can go beyond the cap on that. We have more flexibility than people think. It’s called the bonus cushion and you can exceed the cap with those bonuses. They’re soft so it gives us a little more flexibility.

Q: Which team remaining this year do you like the most?

A: I like Detroit. I told some of our guys in our exit interview to watch, they have a bunch of different types of players but they are all hard and heavy on the puck and it’s hard to strip them of the puck. They’re a smart, experienced team and I really enjoy watching them play. There’s no other team that plays like them.

Q: How are they able to do it consistently?

A: I think it’s obviously a lot of reasons why. Scouting is one. Mentality I think is the biggest reason and that is passed from player to player over time I think it kind of started in the Yzerman era. You’re expected to play this way whatever style you have. There’s a mentality, a message, and a psyche engrained in everyone. We’re trying to get that in the Bruins right now.

Q: I was wrong about Ryder. He really contributed well to the team all season long.

A: Yeah, he really started slow, but I really like the way that he plays. I believe that he can be a 40-goal scorer if he brings his game every night. To me, he had an average series against Carolina but it’s our job to get more out of him and he’s been a good acquisition.

Read More: David Krejci, Mark Recchi, Peter Chiarelli, phil kessil
Recchi, Montador have Bruins up 2-0 after first period 05.12.09 at 7:12 pm ET
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RALEIGH — 19:26: Patrice Bergeron knifes through the Carolina defense and levels a shot at Cam Ward from the right faceoff circle.

18:48: Big heavy shot by Dennis Seidenberg from the right point that Tim Thomas kicked out harmlessly to the right.

17:59: Bruins score that immediately silences that crowd. Bergeron again rushed the puck up the right side of the all by himself, cut through the Hurricanes defense and then dished to a wide open Mark Recchi as Anton Babchuk took out Cam Ward at the net and knocked the post off the moorings. It looked liked the puck got through before the post came unhinged, but it’s under review.

Call on the ice stands. It’s a goal.

17:33: A bad Carolina turnever in their own end leads to another Michael Ryder snap shot from the slot. The Canes look sloppy in this one early.

14:56: Wow. Great behind the back tip pass from David Krejci in the high slot to Steve Montador at the right left point, and Montador beats Ward up high with a slap shot blast. The Carolina crowd’s silence is deafening.

12:06: Big pad save by Thomas on a Tim Gleason bomb from the right point. The Canes look as if everything is coming from the outside in the early going.

Just like I wrote in this piece, it looks like the Bruins players have made a little bit of an adjustment and are sometimes just lugging the puck all the way up the ice with speed rather than passing around too much and letting the forecheck hem them in their own zone.

8:14: Phil Kessel fired a shot from the slot and then just couldn’t corral the rebound in a prime shooting spot in front of the net.

7:40: Best save of the night for Thomas as he was falling forward on a doorstep bid by Eric Staal and basically leapt forward at the puck to block the shot in tight.

5:55: Great job by Patrice Bergeron of forechecking and stealing a puck out of mid-air and then battling with Chad LaRose for a potential one-on-one bid with Ward. Bergeron couldn’t quite get past LaRose, though, and just pushed a diving forehand bid to the right of the goal.

The B’s are putting heavy pressure on Ward in this period from very close to the night.

5:04: Good job by Thomas of blocking a Matt Cullen shot and then directing it toward the side of the net.

4:05: That was Thomas’ best save of the net. Sergei Samsonov rifled a shot from the left faceoff circle and Thomas kicked it to Jussi Jokinen in the slot. Jokinen fired but Thomas able to deflect the shot and avert a really messy situation in close to the B’s cage.

00:30.1: The Hurricanes have really started turning up the pressure, and the Staal, Cole, Whitney line kept the puck in the B’s zone for at least a minute with some really rapid fire puck movement. The possession resulted in Zdeno Chara blasting Eric Staal behind the net and holding him down behind the cage while his teammates tried to get the puck out of the zone. First PP for the Canes.

Big for the B’s to hold off the Canes and sustain their two-goal lead after getting hit with a pretty good shot by Carolina there at the end.

The Bruins have taken a 2-0 lead after one full period of play during Game 6 at the RBC Center in Raleigh, N.C.

Read More: Mark Recchi, Patrice Bergeron, Tim Thomas,
Chara blast gives the B’s a 4-2 win in Game One 04.16.09 at 8:17 pm ET
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Big apologies for the moderate-to-serious Internet difficulties taking place here at the TD Banknorth Garden, but it took until the beginning of the third period to actually land a signal. I’m calling it “JJ Strikes Back” until I can fine a more appropriate term for the wireless outage.

It’s been a pretty entertaining game through two periods, and has played out as so many hockey games have before it. The B’s stormed out to a 2-0 lead midway through the first period and it appeared the Black and Gold were going to sweep the Canadiens right off the ice. David Krejci scored one of the two goals on a nifty roofed backhander, and the B’s were 19-0-2 during the regular season when the young center light the lamp. So all seemed well in the world.

But the Habs fought back in the following two periods and tied it with less than three minutes to go when Russian sniper Alex Kovalev roofed a short-side wrist shot past Tim Thomas’ left shoulder.

10:12: Cross-checking call on Josh Gorges. PP for the Bruins.

9:04: Near miss for the B’s as a Mark Recchi tip hit the cross bar and then nearly trickled into the net before Carey Price pounced on it.

8:45: Goal. Big Z from the point. Power play score and the yellow towels are flying proud everywhere.

7:05: Things just got a nasty in front of the net with Mathieu Schneider taking a big right-handed swipe at Chuck Kobasew after the whistle had blown in front of the Montreal cage. The crowd is chanting “Carey, Carey, Carey” in the familiar sing-song mocking tone.

2:40: Great recovery by Tim Thomas after playing a puck behind the net and then scrambling when Maxim Lapierre gained possession and attempted a wraparound from the right post. Thomas deflected the puck and averted any further damage. Thomas has been very solid here in Game One.

00:31: Great Thomas save on Andrei Kostitsyn during a scramble in front of the Boston net.

13.4: Empty net score for Boston’s Phil Kessel, and the pushing and shoving between these two hated rivals continues. Saku Koivu and Marc Savard were really getting into it in the corner. Habs players went straight for Kessel after he scored. Milan Lucic made a nice little saucer pass to Kessel at the right faceoff circle with Carey Price vacated from the net.

The B’s beat the Habs by a 4-2 score in a Game One that Boston really needed to win if they didn’t want “The Questions” to start popping up.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Mark Recchi, Zdeno Chara,
Once again, Habs bring out the best in B’s 04.09.09 at 11:35 pm ET
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If you were at TD Banknorth Garden and closed your eyes in any one of the three periods during Thursday night’s instant classic between the Bruins and the Canadiens, you might have had flashbacks to last year’s Game 6 against the hated Habs – the best hockey game ever played in the new Garden.

This wasn’t quite the equal of that one — it was after all enough of a throwaway game for the B’s that they felt free to chase down and punish whichever Canadiens players even looked at them askance — but it was a highly entertaining, living, breathing advertisemen for just how great a game hockey can be.

The penalty boxes were overflowing with players from both sides all night, the offenses were clicking at a high rate and ticking off quality chance after quality chance and the 17,565 in attendance — a mixture of the Bruins Faithful and a large number of invading Habs fans from the Great White North — were in the presence of two teams fully primed for the playoffs all wrapped in a 5-4 overtime win for the Bruins.

The Big, Bad B’s lost their minds a little bit in the second period when they paraded to the sin bin with retaliatory-type infractions and allowed Montreal’s power play to rack up three man-advantage strikes, but — like any good playoff  team — they didn’t allow the Habs to run roughshod over them. The Spoked B righted the ship in the third with a return to discipline and a gritty game-tying score by Zdeno Chara while his big body was lurking in front of the Montreal net.

“It was a great game. It was a hard-fought game,” said Patrice Bergeron. “We kind of played our game the whole time, but there’s a part in the second period where we kind of got away from our game, trying to be too physical. I guess: taking just a couple bad penalties and we better stay a little more disciplined. It was a great game, we all know it. The Canadiens are a great team, they never ever stopped and we showed that today.”

With the win, the B’s continue to keep stride with the top Western Conference teams, while the Canadiens drop into an eighth-seed slot that could very easily set them up with the Black and Gold for a sure-to-be-unforgettable first-round playoff pairing.

Many thought it might be wise to rest up Chara and perhaps even play Manny Fernandez in a game that clearly meant more to Montreal than Boston on paper. ”Let the players rest up for the playoffs” some chanted because the meaning of Thursday night’s statement game was lost on them.

Well, it clearly wasn’t lost on a Bruins team that fought from the opening bell when Chara crunched a Habs skater in the corner, and seemed to tweak his knee a little bit in the process. That all-effort bodycheck let the Habs know it was going to be a long, hard-fought battle for the point they needed to get into the playoffs, and it also signaled to everyone watching that the Bruins viewed this game as something of a postseason preamble.

It had all the markings of last season’s playoff struggle, with just a little more confidence and swagger along a Bruins’ bench that contained a bunch of Black and Gold skaters with very little to lose. Brothers in torment Mike Komisarek and Milan Lucic picked up right where they left off last season, and Lucic put a punctuation mark on the dust-up with a horse-collar/face-wash takedown of Komisarek from behind after the Habs D-man had knocked him from behind and pushed the big winger toward the boards.

Alex Kovalev was buzzing around and creating Grade A opportunities with his unbelievable hands and sniper-scope shot — an image that struck fear into the hearts of B’s fans last season, but was all-too absent this year when the Russian star often seemed disinterested under the now-jettisoned Guy Carbonneau.

So much of it was eerily familiar to last spring.

But two Bruins skaters that weren’t present on the ice during last year’s seven game series — Bergeron and Mark Recchi — ended up making all the difference when the ice chips had settled and the 76 total penalty minutes between both hated rivals had been accounted for. Recchi scored two goals, including the OT game-winner off a sweet feed from Bergeron, and was a constant presence in front of the Montreal net when pucks were headed toward Habs netminder Carey Price.

It was Bergeron, who missed last year’s seven-game series in the aftermath of a horrific concussion that nearly ended his career, that seemed to be having the most fun wheeling and dealing out on the ice with bodies flying everywhere around him. He repeatedly took the physical route when in the corner and made smart, creative plays with the puck around the net after going hard to the cage and tapping in Boston’s first score of the night in the opening period.

His physical play sparked the game-winning goal when he belted Maxim Lapierre and removed the puck from the Canadiens skater, and then set up the OT goal. Bergeron skated in toward the right post, drew the Habs attention and then slid a puck to Mark Recchi cutting toward the cage. Recchi banged the puck in, and there was nothing left but good old-fashioned Garden adulation.

The 23-year-old has to be looked at as something of an X-Factor headed into the playoffs after searching for his offensive touch for much of the season, and then really finding it during the month of February and March during which he’s totaled 2 goals and 13 assists in 16 games. He’s looked very much like the old Bergie that captured the imagination of Boston fans during his first three years in the league, and been a driving force behind the surge that he — along with Recchi and Chuck Kobasew — has enjoyed as the playoffs loom closer.

“It’s ironic because, before the game, all the Montreal media were asking about how much Bergie’s come along, and I don’t think I have to say much about him now,” said B’s coach Claude Julien, who wasn’t altogether pleased at how the Bruins were coaxed out of their games by Montreal’s provocative ways in the second period. “They saw it firsthand, and he’s been really, really good for us in the last six weeks, getting better and being more and more of an impact player. Obviously it couldn’t happen at a better time.”

Perhaps this game couldn’t have come at a better time for the Bruins’ players, who once again last night grasped at the intimidating, scoring, dominant force they can be when they are 19 intently focused hockey players all pulling in the same direction.

Injury Ward: Kobasew played through whatever undisclosed ailment bothered him, but P.J. Axelsson, Dennis Wideman and Andrew Ference didn’t crack Thursday night’s lineup. Vladimir Sobotka was also a healthy scratch for the Bruins after getting called up from Providence.

Player of the Game: Bergeron played like a man possessed while ringing up a goal and two assists along with a game-high +3 in a dominant evening of hockey. With exaggeration or hyperbole, that was the best game Bergeron has played since suffering that very first concussion against the Philadelphia Flyers back in October 2007.

Goat Horns: The Bruins as a team lost their cool a little bit in the second period, and Komisarek clearly tried to get under the skin of Lucic to pretty decent effect. Lucic was pretty well in check until he chased Komisarek from behind and dragged to the ice by the scruff of his neck when Shawn Thornton was already engaging him — but the Bruins have built their reputation while refusing to back down to anyone or anything. If the players can find a way to win the game and defend themselves against the flopping, diving, underhanded Habs, then all the better.

Turning Point: Tim Thomas made a point to change his frame of mind headed into the third period after allowing three power play goals to Montreal in the second period – with some of those shots coming from the outside angles that he normally stops with ease.

“I was just thinking to myself ‘you’ve got to find some way to start making all the saves,” said Thomas. “Even if you’re having a hard time finding the puck when it’s leaving the stick, no excuses, make up for it by better positioning or being a little bit more aggressive. Find a way. So I was more thinking like that. ”

Whatever it was, he found a way to make 15 saves in the third period and overtime that helped hold down the fort for Chara’s game-tying score and Recchi’s OT heroics.

Read More: Mark Recchi, Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara,
Bruins get back to basics in victory over Blackhawks 03.07.09 at 6:06 pm ET
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With Blake Wheeler relegated to being a healthy scratch for the Bruins lineup for the first time this season on Saturday afternoon, the message was sent out loud and clear to the entire team that those deserving ice time on merrit – and spots reserved in the 18 skaters sent out for each and every game from here on out – will be getting it regardless of salary, pedigree or reputation.

It’s a point that B’s coach Claude Julien made with Milan Lucic last season at certain points in his rookie season, and something he did in Montreal while coaching Michael Ryder as a rookie amid a group of veterans Canadiens skaters. Julien is hoping that the breather can reinvigorate Wheeler as much as it seemed to help energize the entire hockey club. on Saturday afternoon in a pivotal “show me” game.

“Players in their first year sometimes they get to a point where they hit a wall.  Everything seems to be overwhelming and heavy on them.  Everything we did for him today was for the best for Wheels,” said Julien following the victory. “He’s going to take a step back.  He had an opportunity to watch the game tonight with [Assistant Coach Doug] Houda upstairs (in the press box) and chat about what he was seeing. 

“There’s no doubt that’s going to benefit him. I thought it was important to him at this stage to do that, and he’s too good of a player to keep out of the line-up for a very long time. It was something that I think is certainly going to benefit him in the long run.”

The move — made possible with the addition of the versatile, offensively gifted Mark Recchi to the Bruins lineup this week – clearly paid immediate dividends as it sparked the Bruins offense to 39 shots and five goals in a 5-3 win over the Chicago Blackhawks on Saturday afternoon at the TD Banknorth Garden.

The B’s had previously been working and fighting their way through a listless 3-6-2 stretch over their last 11 games, but many of the traits they’d been shying away from returned in a fiercely lunch-pail opening two periods against an explosive Chicago team.

It was a nod to the Big, Bad hockey game that this young and powerful team featured so many times over the first half of the year: sending willing and able bodies crashing to the net, crushing hits waiting in the corners and for any opposing skater brave or foolish enough to retrieve pucks or invade Boston’s defensive zone, and the kind of skill that can pick a team apart once they’ve been properly loosened by the on-ice B’s battering rams up and down Boston’s roster.

The “back to B’s basics” couldn’t have come at a better time.

“It comes at a very important time because we need to get back on track,” said goalie Tim Thomas. “You can look at our record after January and look at our record the past 10 games and we need to start putting some wins together, whether they are ugly, pretty or hard-worked-for like tonight.”

As it wont to happen with a struggling hockey club seeking to climb out of doldrums, the Black and Gold skaters kept it simple and furiously threw pucks and bodies at the net. Recchi lived to his “Wrecking Ball” moniker by camping out in front of the net and jamming the puck between Crystobal Huet’s pads for the first score, and then tipped a shot through a sliver of an opening for Boston’s third goal.

The Blackhawks skaters tied it up at 1-1 a short time after Recchi’s first strike – just as the Phoenix Coyotes had done only two nights prior — but this time the Bruins didn’t break, bend or fold under the small-ish bit of adversity. Instead, David Krejci followed Recchi’s lead and absorbed an Andrew Ference shot in the gut by the post, and then quickly blasted the loose puck into a crack on the short side of Chicago’s net.

Recchi followed with the second score in tight around the Chicago net that made it 3-1, and the Bruins attack was off and running. The mistake-inducing forecheck and pinpoint pinball passing led to a perfect Marc Savard setup for Phil Kessel in the right faceoff circle, and Kessel — who had fumbled away a similarly picture-perfect dish from Savard in the first period — buried his second chance at scored his team-leading 27th goal of the season. It was a great game overall for Kessel, Lucic and Savard and continued the momentum they began to build up when they were reunited in the third period of their loss to the Coyotes.

It was one of eight shots on goal for the dangerous Kessel, who seemed to take heart to the “earn your ice time” philosophy that Julien was imploring following the offensively-challenged effort against the Phoenix Coyotes on Thursday night: get rubber to the net and good things are going to happen for both the player and the team.

“Every night you watch highlights on TV, and there’s always a few of those (gritty) goals going in. So why not put pucks on net?” said Julien. “I think we need to do that as much as we can.  We lost a game a week ago in here on a shot from outside the blue line.  Those things happen in this game, so it’s important we don’t try and be too cute.”

Injury Ward: Stephane Yelle sustained an injury in the second period after falling backwards into the boards, and won’t be making the trip to New York for Sunday’s matinee against the New York Rangers. Julien said after the game that his veteran center will be evaluated on Sunday, and he’s not sure if Yelle will meet them for Tuesday’s game in Columbus.

Player of the Game: Phil Kessel. The young winger seemed energized in a matchup against Chicago’s fellow young guns like Jonathan Toews and Pat Kane, and fired off eight shots on net — including the eventual game-winner for the B’s in the third period 

Goat Horns:  Brian Campbell and Marty Havlat both finished with -3s for the Blackhawks, and were among several Chicago players overpowered by Recchi down low throughout the game. Havlat was dominant at points, but took some very bad angle, low percentage shots at the cage.

Turning Point: The game wasn’t truly won until the Bruins responded to Chicago’s best roundhouse right in the third period, and P.J. Axelsson turned into a one-man forechecking machine in the closing minute. Axelsson appropriately ended up with the open net score for all his hard work, and the game was placed securely in the W column. It’s moment like these when it’s clear why Axelsson is such a valued member of the Bruins.

Read More: Chicago Blackhawks, Mark Recchi, Phil Kessel,
Krejci and Recchi respond for the Boston Bruins and take lead at 2:22 pm ET
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19:35: Good bid by Milan Lucic from the doorstep after completely cleaning defenseman Matt Walker’s clock in the corner to open the second period.

16:24: The crossbar continues to be unkind to the Blackhawks as Martin Havlat had a great play from the left faceoff circle in looking off Dave Bolland and firing away the Bruins net. The puck beat Thomas, but rocketed off the crossbar and back out of the net. Close call once again for the Spoked ‘B’.

13:07: Juggling save of a Troy Brouwer shot from the high slot by Tim Thomas following a close call to a puck that close to off-sides for the Blackhawks.

12:50: First penalty of the game award goes to Aaron Ward for hooking.

6:51: Great pad save right in front on a bang-bang shot by Dustin Byfuglien, who is having a pretty solid game for Chicago.

6:18: Holding penatly on Andrew Ference as he attempted to break up a furious Martin Havlat rush to the  B’s net.

4:49: Power play goal for Jonathan Toews after a pretty gutsy job of goaltending and penalty killing for the Bruins. Chicago magic man Pat Kane worked the puck down in the right corner for Toews, who wheeled toward the net, shot the puck and got a fortunate bounce off Aaron Ward’s body in front of the net to tie things at 1-1.

4:18: David Krejci answers right back while camped out by the Blackhawks net. He took an Andrew Ference shot off the bread basket, and then tucked the puck in short side before Huet could respond. 

3:48: Mark Recchi shook off a big hit in front of the net and followed with a beautiful tip of a Dennis Wideman shot from the high slot to make it 3-1.

1:47: Great back-to-back stops by Huet on a pair of Patrice Bergeron power play swipes in front of the Chicago net.

The B’s lead the Blackhawks by a 3-1 score after some shock and awe with 00:45 to go in the second period.

Read More: David Krejci, Mark Recchi,
New Bruins ready to take ice… 03.05.09 at 1:33 pm ET
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One thing that has made Claude Julien so popular among his players is his ability to clearly define roles for his team.

He wasted no time on Thursday at the morning skate prior to the Bruins game with the Phoenix Coyotes in doing so for newcomers Mark Recchi and Steve Montador.

He was clear with them – don’t try to do too much too soon. Just play your game.

“They’ve been around,” Julien said. “We’ve already had our one-on-one meetings. I even tried to not give them too much information because I don’t want them going out there and over-thinking. Just go out there and play. We think you’re a good player and that’s why we got you. If there’s some adjustments to make along the way, we can make those. They got the basic crash course. Now it’s just go out there and play.”

Julien was one of those watching Wednesday’s trade deadline with great enthusiasm.

“Well, hopefully our whole team can give us the energy we need but those two guys are certainly bringing some life to our hockey club,” he said. “By the time 3 o’clock rolled around, we were a better team than we were at 9 o’clock, just with the addition of those guys.”

He could notice a jump in his team’s collective step on Thursday morning. They could use one after the performance they gave against the Flyers on Tuesday night, giving up three in the third as Philly captured a 4-2 decision.

He also could tell that some players were relieved that they weren’t the ones dealt out of town from a first-place contender just to shake up the team.

“There’s no doubt that that the guys this morning were pretty excited this morning, not only for still being here but for the additions,” Julien said. “We’re pretty pleased with what’s happened and looking forward to taking another step in the right direction.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, history, Mark Recchi
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