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Mark Recchi with the cold, hard truth: Bruins’ power play ‘needs to be a lot better than that’ 04.26.11 at 11:02 pm ET
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MONTREAL — Moments after losing Game 6 to the Canadiens, 2-1, on a pair of 5-on-3 goals, Bruins veteran Mark Recchi admitted he and his teammates need to do a better job of cashing in on their power play chances. While the Canadiens scored a pair of two-man advantage goals, the Bruins were 0-for-4 on the power play, making them scoreless in 19 chances during the series.

“We had opportunities but it wasn’t good enough for power play on our end,” Recchi said. “Five-on-five, we were terrific. They got a couple of 5-on-3 goals. We have to be a lot better, obviously. We’re not getting any sustained pressure to top it off. We’re getting one shot and it’s getting blocked half the time. We’re not getting pucks on net and so it’s one-and-out kind of thing. You have to find your way back in [the offensive zone] and then one-and-out again. We have to sustain pressure. Our power play hasn’t been that bad all year and then for right now, it hasn’t been good in this series. We get the opportunity [Wednesday], we have to step up.”

Recchi was on the Bruins last year when the team lost its last Game 7 on home ice to the Flyers, 4-3. He and the Bruins have a chance at redemption with a win on Wednesday. If they beat the Canadiens, they will again draw the Flyers in the Eastern semis starting this weekend in Philadelphia.

“It’s a big one [Wednesday],” Recchi said. “We’ll go get some rest and be ready. If we play like that 5-on-5 and if we get opportunities on the power play [in Game 7], we have to be a lot better than that.”

Recchi actually has the chance to do something about it on the ice. Claude Julien can only watch from behind the bench as the team continues to look totally out of kilter.

“Well, let’s put it this way, our power play is struggling,” Julien said. “I think we’ve talked about that every day so far. They scored two goals five-on-three. Five-on-four they weren’t a threat and neither were we. Five-on-five I thought we were obviously a team that held most of the control if the game and that’s what we have to do. We have to stay disciplined, stay away from the penalty box like we talked about at the beginning of the series.

“But I would have liked to have a five-on-three, maybe our power play would have scored as well. But it wasn’t the case and again, it’s one of those games where we tried, we worked hard, we had our chances and we weren’t able to bury them. But certainly not down or disappointed in our game except for the fact those five-on-threes ended up costing us the game.”

Now, it’s Game 7 – the ultimate test in hockey that the Bruins haven’t won since beating Montreal’s Patrick Roy and his case of appendicitis in 1994 at the old Boston Garden. They have lost their last four attempts, including home games in 2010 vs. the Flyers and 2009 vs. the Hurricanes.

“Just focus on getting ready,” Recchi said. “You’ve gotta relax and you’ve got to get ready to play a one-game series now. We worked all year to get home ice and we’re going home and we’ll go get a lot of rest, and focus on what we have to do, make little adjustments but for the most part we’ll just save our energy and get ready.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Mark Recchi
Bruins Game 5 Live Blog: B’s, Habs head to overtime 04.23.11 at 6:29 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia and others at the TD Garden for Game 5 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

<a href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” mce_href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” >WEEI.com Bruins Game 5 Live Blog</a>

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Canadiens, Carey Price
Mark Recchi opts out of morning skate; Habs mum on potential changes at 12:26 pm ET
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All the Bruins were on the ice for Saturday’s morning skate except Mark Recchi, who opted not to take the ice. Recchi also opted out of Thursday’s morning skate before Game 4 in Montreal. The forward lines and defense pairings are expected to be the same as they were in Game 4.

The Canadiens had all hands on deck for their morning skate, but coach Jacques Martin hinted that there could be some changes to the lineup come 7 p.m. Saturday night. “We’ll decide on our lineup game time,” he said, adding that Montreal needs “more from certain people.”

Read More: Jacques Martin, Mark Recchi,
Brad Marchand recalls how Mark Recchi helped him early on as a rookie 04.22.11 at 9:04 pm ET
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Bruins rookie Brad Marchand knows the many ways in which Mark Recchi is a leader. (AP)

MONTREAL — The fact that Mark Recchi is highly respected in the Bruins locker room should come as no surprise to anyone. The 42-year-old has seen everything in his time in the NHL, so when he talks, people listen.

The future Hall-of-Famer did just that after the team’s loss in Game 2 to the Canadiens, telling ESPN recently that he told teammates that they could come back from the 2-0 lead the Habs held after two games. After all, Recchi and the Hurricanes won four in a row to sink the Habs back in 2006 after dropping the first two games of the quarterfinals. The rest, as they say, is history, as the Hurricanes went on to win the Stanley Cup.

Recchi’s words were heard loud and clear by teammates, and they are now halfway to their goal of taking the series after winning Games 3 and 4.

“He said something the other day in the room and everyone kind of perked up a little like, ‘Wow. If Recchi said it, than it’s true,’” linemate Brad Marchand recalled Thursday morning. “It’s great having him here. He’s such a leader. Every time he steps up, he always says the right thing at the right time. It’s great.”

For Marchand, the inspiration from Recchi hasn’t been limited to speeches given to the team. Recchi told the rookie earlier in the season to expect criticism from him.

“One day he was like, ‘I’ll get upset with you. It’s not going to be about you missing a pass, or that you should have given it to me at this [point], but playing your position, little things like that.’ He’s just so good at critiquing you and helping you grow into your game and being in certain positions, stuff like that,” Marchand said. “He was always helping me, telling me to be a certain way or in a certain place. He was really good with that with me throughout the year.”

Marchand’s rookie season was a successful one, as he totaled 21 goals and 20 assists for 41 points. Many of those points came playing on the same line as Recchi and Patrice Bergeron after beginning the season with Gregory Campbell and Shawn Thornton. Though Marchand didn’t always play with Recchi, the help he got from the 42-year-old seemed to come all year after No. 28 expressed an interest in tutoring the youngster.

“He was just like, ‘Listen. I want to help you, and help you out in areas where I think you could maybe do things differently,’ but he never once got upset with me about a pass or anything like that,” Marchand said. “He never got upset with me in general. He would help me out, and any little teaching point that he could help me out with, he really helped me a ton.

“Little things, how he carries himself in the room and off the ice, when to talk to the guys, when to not chirp guys, stuff like that. It’s unbelievable the amount of stuff he knows and he sees throughout the game. He’s like another coach on the ice.”

So, what is a young player thinking when one of the best to play the game begins listing how he could do better? A sensitive player might be disappointed in some, way, shape or form or take feel like they’re doing something wrong. When it comes to Recchi helping Marchand, that isn’t the case.

“You’re very grateful right away, because some guys — a lot of guys — will just sit there and let you make your mistakes,” Marchand said. “He’s that guy that will step up. He likes bringing young guys along, you can tell. The way he talks to everybody, and all the young guys, he helps them out. I was very grateful to have a guy like him teach me things that maybe other guys wouldn’t have. I learned a lot from him this year.”

Recchi’s tutelage of Marchand isn’t the first case in which he’s helped a younger player. Among the youngsters Recchi has helped along the way is Jordan Staal, whom he let live in his guest house back when Staal was a rookie in the 2006-07 season.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Mark Recchi,
Chris Kelly will play Game 4 wearing cage 04.21.11 at 12:55 pm ET
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MONTREAL — Bruins center Chris Kelly will be in the lineup for Game 4 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals after being cleared by team doctors. Kelly, who returned to Boston to be examined following a hit into Carey Price’s goal on Monday, wore a cage in morning skate and will do so Thursday night. He said there was no fracture after seeing the doctors.

“I’m good to play tonight,” Kelly said afterwards. “I went back to see our doctors in Boston and they gave me the green light and said everything is great and to just go out and have fun.”

Coach Claude Julien confirmed that Kelly would play, saying the third-line center is “good to go” and that “he’s going to be in the lineup tonight.”

Kelly was shoved by Habs forward Scott Gomez while the Bruins were on a 3-on-1 in the first period. The B’s center said he took no issue with the hit, which caused him to slide head-first into the post and left him with a shiner below his right eye.

“I know Gomez. I played against him for a lot of years,” Kelly said. “He’s a good, honest player and works hard. I don’t think it was deliberate by any means.”

As for wearing a cage for the first time since he was 14 years old, Kelly said that his comfort with it is “much better” than he expected it to be. Kelly even joked that if he were to play well with it, he could keep it on a la Richard Hamilton with the Detroit Pistons, who kept a clear mask on as his signature look in the 2003-04 season.

“He kept it on,” Kelly joked. “Who knows?”

As for any lineup changes, it appears there won’t be any. Mark Recchi was the only Bruin to not take the ice for the morning skate, though it’s likely the veteran was simply given the morning off. Rookie Tyler Seguin stayed out on the ice with the scratches following the skate.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Chris Kelly, Mark Recchi, Rip Hamilton
Canadiens could be thinking sweep, but they aren’t 04.16.11 at 11:50 pm ET
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The Canadiens took a 2-0 series lead Saturday. (AP)

After winning Games 1 and 2 in Boston, the Canadiens have a chance to close out the series in front of their own fans if they can defend home ice and win the next two games at the Bell Centre, where they went 3-0 against the Bruins in the regular season. Just don’t expect them to be looking ahead to Game 4 and the possibility of a sweep.

“We’re not concerned about the second game or coming back here,” said Canadiens goalie Carey Price. “All we’re worried about is the next game. It’s a cliché, but that’s really all we’re looking forward to, is the next day and the next game.”

Don’t expect them to spend any time celebrating their two straight road victories over their rivals, either.

“I’ve got no time for that,” Michael Cammalleri said. “Seriously. If we’re sitting here happy about that and celebrating, then we’re making a crucial mistake. The fans can be happy and our parents and our families can be happy, and good for them, but I’m dead serious. We have no time to be happy right now.”

The Canadiens know the Bruins are capable of playing better than they have in the first two games and they’re not taking anything for granted or expecting anything to come easy.

“We’re happy with those two games, but we really can’t be satisfied,” Mathieu Darche said. “It’s just going to get tougher. They’ll come to Montreal with a vengeance. We know they’re going to be better, and we’ll have to be better also.”

Price said the Canadiens also can’t get caught up in the excitement of the crowd or get down if something goes wrong.

“We’re going to have to really maintain our composure,” Price said. “I think that’s going to be the biggest thing. The crowd’s behind us and obviously there’s going to a lot of adrenaline, so we have to make sure everybody stays composed.”

The Bruins, meanwhile, aren’t getting down on themselves. They know they’ve been a good road team all season — their 24-12-5 record on the road was fifth-best in the NHL — and even though they’re down 0-2 and haven’t won in Montreal this season, they remain confident.

“It might be a good thing for us to get there and really simplify things and get more composed than we are right now,” Mark Recchi said. “We’ll be fine as long as we regroup here and as long as we embrace it and get ready for a big situation on Monday. The pressure is on us now. I believe in this group of guys and we’re going to have to go show them on Monday.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Carey Price, Mark Recchi, Mathieu Darche
Report: Michael Cammalleri says he ‘won’t be like Mark Recchi and diagnose the other team’ at 12:50 pm ET
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Where would we be without twitter? The Montreal Gazette’s Dave Stubbs tweeted Saturday that Michael Cammalleri had an interesting take on Zdeno Chara‘s dehydration when talking to TSN after the team’s morning skate. Asked about Chara, Cammalleri reportedly said, “I’m no MD, so I’m not going to be like Mark Recchi and diagnose the other team.”

Cammalleri was obviously taking a shot at Recchi’s suggestion last month that the Canadiens exaggerated Max Pacioretty‘s head injury following his hit from Chara on March 8.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Mark Recchi, Michael Cammalleri, Zdeno Chara
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