Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Martin Brodeur’
Andrew Ference on D&C: David Krejci ‘a completely different player when he’s feeling good’ 03.02.12 at 10:56 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference checked in with the Dennis & Callahan show Friday morning to discuss Thursday night’s overtime victory over the Devils and his take on the dynamics of the team as the result of moves before the trade deadline.

Coach Claude Julien shuffled the lines Thursday night, putting David Krejci with Tyler Seguin and Milan Lucic. The line responded with all four B’s goals, including a Krejci hat trick.

“It’s pretty tough to break them up after that,” Ference said. “The good thing about that — you’re happy to see anybody score and get some goals going, but especially Dave. He’s a completely different player when he’s feeling good, got that confidence going. It transforms him when he’s got a smile on his face, when he’s not as frustrated when he’s not scoring.”

Ference took only three shifts in the third period Thursday after suffering what Julien referred to as a lower-body injury. Despite his injury, Ference kept a positive attitude, praising the team’s efforts, especially goalie Tim Thomas, for pulling out the win. Asked if credit for the team’s success belongs more to Thomas or the defense, Ference said it’s a combination of the two.

“It’s like when last year, we talked about winning. No one guy could have won without the other; we’re not that kind of team,” Ference said. “Obviously Timmy was unbelievable, but without our system and without the way we play, we don’t win and vice versa. I think we have a great system and all that, but without Timmy playing the way he does, we don’t get it.”

The Bruins landed center Brian Rolston and defenseman Mike Mottau from the Islanders and defenseman Greg Zanon from the Wild minutes before the NHL trade deadline.

“I like what we did,” Ference said. “Obviously you can see there’s injuries at this time of year and you need those guys that have that experience to step in, instead of just throwing a rookie to the wolves that’s never played before, then expect him to just jump in at this time of year is pretty tough.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Andrew Ference, Claude Julien, David Krejci, Martin Brodeur
How far do Vezina winners take their teams in the playoffs? 03.31.11 at 12:03 am ET
By   |  2 Comments

Everyone knows that goaltending plays a major role in the postseason. It isn’€™t always about who has the best goalie, but who has the hotter goalie.

This season, the Bruins have the best goalie, as Tim Thomas seems to have all but sewn up the Vezina. So, if Thomas is awarded the trophy this summer in Las Vegas, will he receive it having recently won the Stanley Cup? We take a look at how far goaltenders’ teams have gone in the playoffs in their Vezina-winning seasons.

First, here are some quick numbers on Thomas if he is to win the Vezina this year:

– He will become the first Bruins goaltender to win it since some guy named Tim Thomas way back in 2008-09.

– He will become the fifth goalie to win multiple Vezinas since the adoption of its current criteria in 1982 (it had previously been awarded to the goalie who played the majority of the games for whichever team allowed allowed the fewest goals). He would join an elite class of all-time greats, as Dominik Hasek (six), Martin Brodeur (four), Patrick Roy (three) and Ed Belfour (two) have also won the trophy multiple times since then.

– Since 1982, only Thomas and Pete Peeters (1983) have won the Vezina while playing for the Bruins.

– Thomas would become the third Bruins goaltender to win multiple Vezinas, joining Tiny Thompson (four) and Frank Brimsek (two). He would join Thompson as the only Boston goaltenders to win two Vezinas over the span of three seasons. Thompson won it in 1936 and 1938, and also won in 1930 and 1933.

Now here’€™s a look at how the teams of goalies that won the Vezina recently fared in the playoffs that season:

2010: Ryan Miller ‘€“ Sabres eliminated in first round
2009: Tim Thomas ‘€“ Bruins eliminated in second round
2008: Martin Brodeur ‘€“ Devils eliminated in first round
2007: Martin Brodeur ‘€“ Devils eliminated in second round
2006: Miikka Kiprusoff ‘€“ Flames eliminated in first round
2005: Season cancelled due to lockout
2004: Martin Brodeur ‘€“ Devils eliminated in first round
2003: Martin Brodeur ‘€“ Devils won Stanley Cup
2002: Jose Theodore ‘€“ Canadiens eliminated in second round
2001: Dominik Hasek ‘€“ Sabres eliminated in second round
2000: Olaf Kolzig ‘€“ Capitals eliminated in first round

Note that only Brodeur in 2003 even led his team past the second round. Since 1988, only two teams with Vezina winners have won the Cup that season. The Bruins are trying to prove they can make it to the Eastern Conference finals after knocking on the door, the past two seasons, so judging by these numbers, they might have to hope that history doesn’€™t repeat itself.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Martin Brodeur, Tim Thomas, Tiny Thompson
Tim Thomas: ‘It’s time to start righting the ship’ 11.15.10 at 11:40 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Tim Thomas was happy to admit that his fourth shutout of the season was a collective effort. Thanks to the blocked shots of Dennis Seidenberg and captain Zdeno Chara effectively rubbing out Ilya Kovalchuk and Patrick Elias, Thomas faced just 28 shots and stopped them all in a 3-0 win over the Devils Monday night at TD Garden.

But that wasn’t the biggest story. The Bruins managed to put three pucks behind future Hall of Famer Martin Brodeur, one more than they scored during an unlikely three-game home ice losing skid.

“There was definitely a little urgency but it was a controlled urgency,” Thomas said. “It wasn’t a panicked urgency. It was more like, ‘Hey, it’s time to start righting the ship and tonight’s a good place to start.'”

The Bruins were just 2-4-1 on home ice this season.

“I personally approached it as a must-win and I think the team did too,” Thomas said. “We need to get back on track; we need to show some urgency. We faced a team that’€™s been playing better but has struggled this year, and we needed to come out with the win so that we could start building and getting back to the game that we were playing when we were having success.”

Thomas did face pressure at times, like late in the second period when the Devils fired the last six shots of the period.

“Yeah, that and the first couple minutes of the game there,” Thomas said. “Elias was very, very patient. You know, there was some times where we really controlled the play for long periods of time and there were other times where they made a push and I just had to be on my toes and the team had to be on their toes for the rebounds.”

The way it played out, Thomas weathered the storm at the start, and had pretty much clear sailing the rest of the way.

“I don’€™t know, well, you could look at it either way. Yeah, it could be tough, or looking back, it actually could help get me into the game,” Thomas said. “And it happened so quick that I didn’€™t have time to think about it. I didn’€™t have time to think, ‘€œIs this really happening in the first minute of the game?’€ It was just like, ‘€œI got to find some way to stop this thing.’€

“It’s a similar feeling to how I felt against Washington, probably early this year was the closest that I kind of felt like that. I just felt like they weren’€™t going to find a way to score.”

As the minutes wound down, he could sense he was closing in on his 21st career shutout, just 91 shy of his counterpart Monday night.

“The last several minutes you start to put some emphasis because you don’€™t want to work that hard and not get it,” Thomas said. “I used to not care about shutouts and I still don’€™t for the most part, but that was 21 and 25 is a milestone that few people reach in the NHL.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils
Devils at Bruins preview, 11/15/10 at 5:14 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Martin Brodeur did not participate in the Devils’ optional morning skate on Monday, but he is expected to get the start in net on Monday night when the Devils take on the Bruins. Tim Thomas was first off the ice in the Bruins’ morning skate, making a Brodeur-Thomas matchup likely. Thomas and the Bruins beat the Devils, 4-1, on Oct. 16 in New Jersey.

WHERE IT’S AT

– The Bruins are 2-4-1 in home games, and 2-3-1 at the Garden. They’ve scored just two goals over their last three home games, a span in which they have gone 0-2-1.

– The Devils are 4-5-0 on the road this season and 2-4-0 in their last six road games.

NOTABLE NUMBERS

– Here’s one that hasn’t been repeated over and over: Shawn Thornton, at three goals this season, has just one less than $100 million man, Ilya Kovalchuk. Beat that dead horse!

– Monday night will be Claude Julien’s 499th career game. He’s coached the majority of them (260) for the Bruins.

– In three home starts this season, Thomas has allowed three goals: two on Saturday against the Senators, and one in the home opener. He is 2-1-0 at home, including a shutout vs. the Maple Leafs on Oct. 28.

STORYLINES GOING IN

– Expect a bit of line shuffling for the Bruins. The merlot line/energy line/Shawn-Thornton-has-three-goals line was tinkered with, and the tweaked result is now the third line. Michael Ryder replaces Thornton on the right wing, and the third line now appears to be Gregory Campbell between Brad Marchand and Ryder.

The move also allows Tyler Seguin to resume the role of the fourth line center, though Julien said Monday that he’s not afraid to use him late in games in which the team needs a goal given his natural ability. Here are what the lines could look like:

Lucic – Bergeron – Horton

Caron – Wheeler – Recchi

Marchand – Campbell – Ryder

Paille – Seguin – Thornton

Chara – Ference

Hunwick – Seidenberg

Stuart – McQuaid

Thomas

Rask

The move, at face value at least, also makes things worse on Seguin given that he and Ryder had a very apparent chemistry on the ice, seemingly always connecting on gutsy passes.

– It is Military Appreciation Night here at the Garden. Both Mark Stuart and Blake Wheeler have purchased $5,000 in tickets to the game, which will be given to troops. It is Stuart’s second straight year of buying tickets for the troops.

– Until the Bruins prove capable of winning at home, the attention is going to be on their play at the Garden. Nathan Horton, despite playing one of his best games in a Bruins uniform against St. Louis, hasn’t picked up a point in any of the B’s last four games at the Garden.

Read More: Martin Brodeur, Shawn Thornton, Tim Thomas,
Tyler Seguin up to speed, won’t ‘over-respect’ Martin Brodeur, Devils 10.14.10 at 2:07 pm ET
By   |  3 Comments

WILMINGTON — Anyone with access to YouTube can be the judge of whether Tyler Seguin‘s first goal as a member of the Bruins rivaled Jordan Eberle‘s first NHL tally. Seguin pointed out on Sunday with grin that the Oilers rookie’s first goal was more impressive than his breakaway clinic on hand-eye coordination despite not having seen his own goal’s replay.

Four days later, could Seguin have avoided even seeing his replay in the time following the team’s 3-0 win over the Coyotes? Likely not. Friends have directed him to websites showcasing the play, while family members have texted him support. The second overall pick actually did not call his parents in Prague following the game, given that the team was hurrying to leave for Boston, and he joked that the long-distance charges would make the call to Ontario a “pretty pricey call.” Despite not being able to hear the reaction from his folks, Seguin is pretty confident he could imagine the scene.

“I think my mom was screaming probably,” Seguin said.

Much had been made during the summer and the preseason of how Seguin would adjust to the NHL in the early going. So far, it’s been as predicted — it seems he’ll have an impact as a scorer, while the rest of his game fills out. One positive about the former OHL MVP is that he’s more concerned with on-ice adjustments than he is about dealing with nerves. He’s been a hyped prospect for too long to make him shy on the professional ice. In fact, he noted that O2 Arena didn’t even bring out the most nerves he’s felt thus far in the process.

“I think I was more nervous going into the first preseason game against Montreal than I was for my first NHL game for whatever reason,” Seguin said. “It was kind of the same game, but the pace was much different [Saturday]. It really took only one period to adapt, but I feel pretty comfortable out there now.”

Unlike some of his teammates, Seguin had been to Prague multiple times, so seeing the city was nothing new. As much as the “team bonding” thing has been played up in wake of the trip, Seguin didn’t view it as something that should be overlooked. He felt the trip brought players closer together, with the re-signings of Patrice Bergeron and Zdeno Chara evidence that the team is what he called “a big family.”

———–

Seguin had an interesting take when asked Thursday how he felt about facing a future Hall of Fame goaltender in Devils’ netminder Martin Brodeur. Seguin, 18, noted that though he is a younger player who grew up watching many of the players still in the league, getting anxious to face certain players is not the right way to look at things.

“Every single team is going to have their superstars. I don’t really look at that,” Seguin said. “Obviously, I’m always going to be a hockey fan, but I’m still here. This is my job now. I’m not going to over-respect too many people with the opposition. If you give people too much respect, they’ll take your game right away from you.”

Brodeur made 24 saves on Wednesday night in the Devils’ 1-0 victory over the Sabres. It was Brodeur’s 111th career shutout.

Read More: Martin Brodeur, Tyler Seguin,
Hat trick: Statement made? 03.30.10 at 11:05 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

It’s all right, Bruins fans. You can say that you thought Tuukka Rask would have bested Martin Brodeur in the shootout had another 19 seconds passed.

Goaltending ‘€” and a relentlessly irritating Bruins offense ‘€” took center stage Tuesday night as Patrice Bergeron notched the game-winner in the final minute of overtime to give the Bruins a 1-0 win over New Jersey. The way Brodeur was giving up rebounds and the way the Bruins seemed to just miss capitalizing on them time and time again, it was perfectly fitting that the game ended in the Bruins’ assistant captain collecting the change on a Mark Stuart shot from the point to give Boston a very important two points.

While the Bruins only got on the board once, their peppering of Brodeur (34 shots on goal) provided all the offense necessary to get past one of the game’s all-time greats.

Coming off the win, the Bruins remain in possession of the eighth and final playoff bid in the Eastern Conference. With a game in hand on the Thrashers, a playoff berth is the Bruins’ to lose. Just as interestingly, having played as many games with as many points (76 GP, 82 points), as the Canadiens and Flyers, a sixth seed and potential matchup with the Sabers rather than the Capitals remains in their grasp.

Here is the hat trick of lessons learned in a well-deserved win in which the Bruins defense allowed just 21 shots on goal in nearly 65 minutes:

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: ilya kovalchuk, Martin Brodeur, Patrice Bergeron, Tim Thomas
B’s Bruiser returns to the Looch Lair 10.28.08 at 9:32 am ET
By   |  1 Comment

It’s a homecoming tonight for Vancouver homeboy Milan Lucic, who played junior hockey for the Vancouver Giants and is appropriately pumped to play his first ever NHL game at GM Place against the Canucks on Tuesday night. The local Vancouver media has the requisite “prodigal pugilist coming home” stories with the best of them including a photo gallery and baby picture of Looch before he became the 20-year-old glass-shattering Hulk lurking on the TD Banknorth Garden ice.

Lucic told ESPN’s Louise K. Cornetta last weekend that he was understandably besieged by ticket requests in his home city, but he instead bought just seven tickets for his parents, siblings and grand-parents to attend the game. Lucic’s older brother Jovan, however, rented out a luxury box at GM Place for at least 70 of Lucic’s closest admirers, so there should be an usual amount of cheering and “Looch Calls” for the Bruiser in the Spoked B on Tuesday night. 

The Looch started slowly during B’s training camp this fall amid expectations that he was going to immediately morph into Cam Neely as a 20-year-old NHL neophyte, but it’s fair to say he’s now hitting his stride after creating a youtube sensation with his monster hit against the Maple Leafs and then following that by rattling off the first hat trick of his career last weekend. Much of Lucic’s success can be traced to the natural physical gifts bestowed upon the hulking power forward, but the youngster also has the work ethic to match — as his former Vancouver Giants strength and conditioning coach, Ian Gallagher, told Pucks with Haggs last month: 

‘€œHe certainly did a lot of his power speed-work and he’€™s getting older now’€¦so his game is coming along appropriately fast. The first step is all about power that allows you to go from a stationary position to full exertion very quickly. So plyometrics are a big staple of his program and power cleaning is a big staple of his program. Change of direction is big with a lot of diagonal sprints where they’€™re stopping and going quickly There was steady growth for Milan over the summer. He’€™s got great genetics and he’€™s a very committed person. He came back very motivated and very willing to improve, and his scores improved over the summer as you expect somebody would that’€™s got the proper motivation. Nothing surprises me with Milan though because he’€™s got a real disposition for growth.’€

‘€œHe’€™s got a great frame to put on muscle mass and handle it. He’€™s got great levers and he’€™s got a very strong core and a good musculature to him that allows him to excel,’€ said Gallagher. ‘€œHis leg mass is tremendous. His leg press is well over 900 pounds for eight reps and his power clean for reps is 275 pounds, which are both really football player-like numbers.

‘€œWhich is a little amazing because he’€™s got a very unassuming musculature to him. Because you look at his arms and there’€™s not a heck of a lot of mass to them, but his core is just so bloody powerful. His legs are massive and his trunk is massive, and when he gets those big muscles going it demonstrates itself in a powerful way when he collides with somebody or when he’€™s shooting the puck. I think it’€™s one of his biggest assets.’€

 

 

 

New rules kicked around at GM Meetings
Here’s a good piece from respected columnist Ken Campbell from The Hockey News about some of the rule proposals discussed at the GM Meetings in Chicago that Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli mentioned to Pucks with Haggs last week. Included in the proposals are some pretty revolutionary ideas, like penalizing players for leaving their feet to block shoots.
Offense has been up thus far this season, but these kinds of rules would really take the NHL back to the offensively heavy NHL days of yore. Diving to block shots is such a time-honored, gritty way to play ‘D’ in your own zone that I’d be hesitant to take it out the game, but wide open hockey does have its positives. 

–In other link news: Don Cherry takes some well-aimed shots at Dallas Stars bad boy Sean Avery during last weekend’s Coach’s Corner on Hockey Night in Canada after the rough-and-tumble forward backed out of a few fights over the last week — including a potential scrap with New Jersey Devils forward David Clarkson, who dropped his stick and had the gloves coming off in anticipation. Something tells me Clarkson might have been defending the honor of legendary goalie Martin Brodeur, who Avery called “fatso” during the playoffs last season when the NHL adopted the “Avery Rule.”

 
 

 

 

 

Read More: Boston Bruins, David Clarkson, Don Cherry, Hockey Night in Canada
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines