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Breakdown of possible Bruins trade targets: Jaromir Jagr, Ryane Clowe, Mark Streit, etc. 03.29.13 at 2:01 pm ET
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With Jarome Iginla off the market, the Bruins still are hoping to bring in an impact player before the April 3 trade deadline, likely a defenseman to bolster their depth there or a top-nine forward. Here’s a look at who they may be considering.

Martin St. Louis, F, Lightning

Despite having the third- and fourth-highest scorers in the league, Tampa Bay is outside the playoff picture looking in right now, and consequently, rumors have swirled about a possible St. Louis trade. St. Louis, 37, has eight goals and 34 assists this year in 33 games, and his 42 points are good for fourth in the league behind Steven Stamkos.

Tampa GM Steve Yzerman told ESPN.com’s Pierre LeBrun Friday that St. Louis will not be traded. With Iginla off the market, though, many see St. Louis as second prize, another forward who’s past his prime but can clearly still make a significant impact. He is signed through next season with a $5.625 million cap hit and a no-trade clause.

Here’s a look at St. Louis scoring a hat trick in his 900th career game, against the Devils on Feb. 4, 2012.

Jaromir Jagr, F, Stars

Plenty of teams would love to bring in Jagr at the deadline for a playoff run, but the Stars reportedly would like to re-sign him. Jagr’s 25 points (14 goals and 11 assists) are a team high, and he’s making $4.55 million on his current one-year deal.

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Read More: Jaromir Jagr, Jay Bouwmeester, Mark Streit, Martin St. Louis
Steve Yzerman says Lightning will not trade Martin St. Louis at 12:30 pm ET
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Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman told ESPN.com’s Pierre LeBrun Friday that the team will not trade right wing Martin St. Louis. Following the trade of Jarome Iginla to the Penguins, it had been speculated that the Bruins could target St. Louis in a trade, but that should be put to rest now.

“Marty St. Louis is not going to be traded,” Yzerman told LeBrun. “He remains one of the best players in the league and an extremely important player to our team, both on and off the ice. We are a team in transition, we just made a coaching change, Marty is one of the leaders of the team, he is not going anywhere.”

St. Louis, 37, is signed through 2014-15 with an annual $5.625 million cap hit and has a no-trade clause. In 33 games this season, he has eight goals and 34 assists for 42 points and a minus-3 rating.

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Jarome Iginla, Martin St. Louis,
Barry Pederson on D&C: ‘I think [Bruins] are going to make a deal’ 03.27.13 at 9:45 am ET
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Barry Pederson of NESN joined Dennis & Callahan on Wednesday morning to discuss what the Bruins might do before the trade deadline, what price they should pay for a player like Jarome Iginla, and why Nathan Horton and Milan Lucic are struggling to produce.

“I think they believe, the way they are constructed right now, they feel they have the potential to win, but I think there’s a lot of question marks,” Pederson said. “They need to get their offense going. They need to get their power play going.”

Pederson said the Bruins could be justified in giving up Malcolm Subban, another highly regarded prospect and a draft pick for Iginla if they’re confident they can sign Iginla to a multi-year deal. He also brought up Martin St. Louis as a possible trade target for the Bruins.

“I think he’s got a lot more to give and he would probably like to win another Cup,” Pederson said of St. Louis. “I just love his game, and I think the Bruins’ fans do as well. He can play all three positions. He may be small in stature, but as we have seen, he is a guy that gives it. He’s got great intensity. He brings offense. He makes your power play better. I think he would love to play in this system with this team. And they’re in the selling mode. That’s another name to me that’s very intriguing. [Compared to Iginla] I think the price with St. Louis would be a little bit more.”

Whether or not the Bruins deal for one of the bigger names on the market, Pederson said he thinks GM Peter Chiarelli will either do something to bolster the top six forwards or add depth to the defense, or both.

“I think they’re going to make a deal,” he said. “[AdamMcQuaid‘s injury puts you in a tough position. Chris Kelly, you don’t know how he’s going to come back from that injury … The other thing we have to remember is, this is the first time since the last collective bargaining agreement that next year’s salary cap is going lower. If you’re a seller, you may be better off now making a deal now than waiting for the summertime when everybody has to do it.”

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Read More: Barry Pederson, Jarome Iginla, Jaromir Jagr, Martin St. Louis
Bruins can’t close out Lightning despite David Krejci hat trick 05.25.11 at 10:46 pm ET
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TAMPA — The Bruins and Lightning are heading back to Boston to decide the Eastern Conference finals, as a hat trick from David Krejci was not enough to propel the B’s into the Stanley Cup Finals — instead, it was a 5-4 loss in Game 6 Wednesday night.

After the Bruins erased an early 1-0 Bolts lead with goals from Milan Lucic and Krejci. Tampa would come back with three unanswered goals before a back-and-forth third period left the B’s down by one following Krejci’s third goal.

Teddy Purcell did most of the Lightning’s damage to Tim Thomas, opening the scoring just 36 into the contest and giving Tampa a 3-2 lead 13:35 into the second period. Purcell now has six goals this postseason, three of which have come this round.

Thomas made 21 saves for the Bruins, while Dwayne Roloson stopped 15 of the Bruins’ 19 shots.

Game 7 will be played at TD Garden on Friday.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR BRUINS

- Another goal allowed very early for the Bruins. Krejci was set to take the face-off against Vincent Lecavalier and was tossed from the dot, allowing Lecavalier to go against Chris Kelly. The Tampa center won it cleanly, allowing for Purcell to blast one past Thomas. It was the Lightning’s second goal in the first minute of a game this series, and third goal in the first 1:09. Amazingly, it was the only game in the aforementioned three that the Lightning won.

- Yes, Eric Furlatt was officiating and the Lightning were penalized more than the B’s, but it was Tampa that won out when it came to actually capitalizing. The Bruins’ power play looked improved with Zdeno Chara in front, and Krejci scored his second of the game with the B’s on the man advantage in the third, but the Lightning went 3-for-4 as opposed to Boston’s 1-for-5.

- Once again, the Bruins simply couldn’t build momentum at St. Pete Times Forum. After blowing a 3-0 lead in Game 4, the B’s blew a 2-1 lead in the second and got no boost from Krejci’s goal that brought them within one in the third. Martin St. Louis scored 29 seconds after Krejci’s tally.

- Taking an interference penalty with 13:02 remaining in a game in which your team is trying to make a two-goal comeback probably isn’t what you want to do if you’re Tomas Kaberle. The polarizing defenseman did just that in the corner on a play that left Ryan Malone bloodied. Kaberle actually had a good night defensively, but the penalty won’t help his reputation around Boston as a bust of an acquisition.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

- Krejci’s hat trick gives him five goals in six Eastern Conference finals games. The dominance from the second round hasn’t been there, but the numbers have been.

- Say what you want about Lucic disappearing this postseason, but he always smells blood when his team has a chance of ending a series. Lucic had a pair of tallies in Game 4 against the Flyers in the second round last year, and had three goals in Games 6 and 7 combined against Philly last year. Taking Games 6 and 7 against the Habs this year into consideration, Lucic now has 6 goals in the last six games in which the Bruins could eliminate an opponent.

- Dennis Seidenberg had a big play for the Bruins on a play in which the Lightning could have made it 4-2 late in the second. A Marc-Andre Bergeron shot yielded a rebound that Steven Stamkos tapped toward the net with Thomas out of position. Seidenberg literally put his foot down, stepping in front of the puck before it could hurt the B’s and starting a circus that landed Andrew Ference in the box for cross-checking Stamkos. The Lightning would score on the power play early in the second period on a goal from Stamkos, thus making the transaction a wash.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Andrew Ference, Chris Kelly, David Krejci
Don’t expect more ‘pond hockey’ between Bruins and Lightning for Game 3 05.19.11 at 1:19 pm ET
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TAMPA — Steven Stamkos may only be 21 years old but he certainly can articulate like a crafty and well-versed veteran in the ways of winning playoff hockey.

He also proved Thursday morning in the hours before Game 3 at St. Pete Times Forum that he was playing close attention to what his coach was preaching and teaching during film analysis of the Game 2 loss to the Bruins Tuesday night at TD Garden.

After the game Tuesday, Guy Boucher spoke of how his team got into pond hockey and lost the race. He told his players in film study that he didn’t want that to happen again, even if it means giving up some scoring chances that came from desperate hockey in the third period.

“I don’t think for us there is a fine line,” Stamkos said. “I think that line doesn’t exist. We don’t want to play that run-and-gun pond hockey. That’s not our structure. That’s not how we’ve won games this year. At the end of the day, we had a lot of scoring chances, probably moreso that any other game we’ve played, maybe all year, but we didn’t win the game. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Martin St. Louis, Michael Ryder
Lightning’s penalty kill shuts down Bruins in Game 1 05.15.11 at 2:04 am ET
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The Bruins’ power play deserves all the criticism it gets for its performance in the playoffs, but the Lightning’s penalty kill also deserves quite a bit of credit for its performance in Game 1.

The Lightning made it difficult for the Bruins’ man advantage, which went 0-for-4 in the game, to enter the zone and get set up all night long. They pressured the Bruins out high and forced them to gain entry by dumping the puck instead of sitting back and letting the B’s skate over the blue line. They also did a good job winning races to pucks and clearing the zone quickly, and they consistently got in passing and shooting lanes.

That’s not really all that surprising given the fact that the Lightning ranked eighth in the regular season on the PK at 83.8 percent. They’ve taken their game to an even higher level in the playoffs, killing off penalties at a 94.8-percent clip (55 for 58).

“I think we’ve had a good penalty kill all year long, top five for most of the year,” coach Guy Boucher said. “I think we’re following that up in the playoffs. We had a really good penalty kill in the first series and the second series. We’ve got to adjust to the other team and at the same time stay confident in what we are doing. Obviously our guys pay the price a lot and I think that’s the key to our penalty kill.”

Goalie Dwayne Roloson said there’s no one thing that has been the key to the Lightning’s successful PK, but that it’s more about attention to detail.

“Our guys have done a great job focusing and doing the little things to allow us to kill those penalties off,” Roloson said. “You know, whether it’s battles at the blue line or getting pucks down deep when we get that opportunity. So there’s no one thing. I think it’s just, for us as a team, just playing within our structure and doing the little things that we have to do to win hockey games.”

Although there might not be one specific key, the Lightning’s shot blocking is one thing that really stands out. They blocked 17 shots total in the game, with at least a handful of those coming while they were shorthanded.

“You have to block shots,” said forward Martin St. Louis. “It is a desperate time of the year. I think it is the mentality we have, blocking a lot of shots all year long and in the playoffs. … You want to get that shot and block that shot and make an attempt to block every shot so Rollie gets less work.”

As good as Tampa Bay’s penalty kill was, though, there was still a lot the Bruins’ power play could’ve done better.

“I thought our execution could certainly have been better, especially on those entries there,” said Bruins coach Claude Julien. “If we do our job properly, I think we are going to have success, but you need the execution. … You need the execution to be there and you need the killer instinct. When you have the chance, you need to bury those things. And same thing with the loose pucks, you have to be first on those and make sure you get them and not the other team. So execution, killer instinct is something that needs to be better on our power play moving forward here.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Dwayne Roloson, Martin St. Louis
Lightning coach Guy Boucher: Tim Thomas is in ‘everybody’s head’ 05.13.11 at 8:49 pm ET
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Tim Thomas dominated the Tampa Bay Lightning during the regular season much in the same way he dominated the rest of the NHL. So, maybe nobody should’ve been shocked when their head coach admitted Friday that the Bruins goalie is in their heads.

Thomas was a perfect 3-0-0 this season against the Lightning, with 1.67 goal against, allowing just five goals in the three games.

“Well, I’m sure we’re no different than any other team or any other coaches,” Tampa Bay coach Guy Boucher said Friday. “We do study the other goaltender. I’m sure they studied ours. There’s tendencies and things you want to focus on.

“But I think the players play the game, everything is done in fractions of seconds. It’s quite difficult to all of a sudden change their ways. We do want to focus on a few things. But the reality is, whatever we plan against Tim Thomas, he’s probably going to find a way to counter that. I think you want to watch out and not focus too much on the other team’s goaltender.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Martin St. Louis, NHL
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