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Looking at the Bruins’ goaltending after the Marty Turco signing 03.05.12 at 10:55 pm ET
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The Bruins signed Marty Turco Monday. (AP)

The Bruins did what they had to Monday evening, signing Marty Turco to a deal that will land the longtime Stars netminder in Boston as long as he passes through waivers.

The 36-year-old Turco hasn’t been a particularly good NHL goaltender since 2008, and he allowed 12 goals in four games in Austria this season. Still, the Bruins were smart to recognize that without Tuukka Rask (out 4-6 weeks with an abdomen strain/groin strain), they aren’t in a position to give important minutes on a team trying to get its mojo back to an AHL backup (no offense, Michael Hutchinson).

First Turco, who had a 3.02 goals-against average and .897 save percentage in 29 games for the Blackhawks, must pass through waivers before joining the team Wednesday. Given that Craig Anderson is out for the Senators, Ottawa could claim Turco to make the Bruins’ lives a little more difficult, so keep an eye on whether Turco ends up making it to Boston.

If all goes according to plan and Turco isn’t claimed, it’s a good move. The Bruins could still have a race for the division on their hands and they want to be playing better-than-.500 hockey going into the postseason, so they need to start winning games without exhausting Tim Thomas. For that reason, picking up a veteran goalie who’s won games in this league makes a lot more sense than giving Rask’s starts to an AHL guy or adding them onto Thomas’ workload.

Because Turco signed with the Bruins after the trade deadline, he won’t be eligible for postseason play, assuming he clears waivers and gets to the B’s in the first place. That means that if Rask isn’t ready for the start of the playoffs, the B’s might head into the playoffs with either Anton Khudobin (assuming he’s healthy by then) or Hutchinson between the pipes. This goes without saying on every level, but the sooner Rask can return the better.

If Turco does get to the Bruins and is at the very least serviceable, it will have been a good signing, because this team might have been in trouble if Michael Hutchinson was getting trotted out there for eight or nine games down the stretch. Turco won’t be asked to single-handedly win games for the B’s, but as long as a Turco start isn’t an automatic loss, it’s better than the alternative.

As far as Rask’s situation goes, don’t kid yourself: Losing Rask is a big one. After all, when Rask was at his best this season, he was every bit as good as Thomas was last October, the best month of Thomas’ Vezina-winning season. Rask has struggled in recent games (0-4-2 over his last seven starts), but if he had found a way to return to his November and early December form (four goals allowed over seven games with three shutouts) the Bruins could have entered the playoffs with, as they love to say, two No. 1 goalies. And for all the talk of “keeping Thomas fresh,” the team’s No. 1 concern should be returning Thomas to what he was last year, because what he’s been since late January (a 2.92 goals-against average since Jan. 22) isn’t it.

When Rask was at his best and blanking teams left and right, it was only natural to wonder: If the Bruins fell down two games to none this season, like they did to begin the playoffs last year, would Rask end up getting a game? That question was an easy no last year, but it was at the very least worth pondering in November. If Thomas picks it up again, nobody will need to worry about that, but not having Rask there certainly changes the look of the goaltending situation, even if he isn’t the No. 1 guy.

Read More: Marty Turco, Tuukka Rask,
Marty Turco on M&M: If Canucks don’t win, ‘backlash will be felt for a long time’ 06.15.11 at 1:52 pm ET
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Marty Turco

Blackhawks goalie Marty Turco joined the Mut & Merloni show Wednesday afternoon to talk about Bruins-Canucks Game 7. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

Turco has been a guest analyst for NHL Network since his team was eliminated by the Canucks in the opening round. Chicago, the defending Stanley Cup champion, fell behind 3-0 in the series before rallying to force a Game 7 that Vancouver won 2-1.

Turco made it clear that he doesn’t like the Canucks’ brash style.

“That’s where it really got me, was when we were in Chicago and they’re up in the game, and they’re running their mouths, and they are real cocky,” he said. “Never mind that my team beat them the two previous years, knocked them out. You think they’d learn their lesson and just go about their business, but that wasn’t the case. It was quite interesting to watch us come back and know that we had them. We know that they’re playing differently.

“It was eerily similar in this [Bruins] series. I didn’t see them as cocky as they were going up 3-0 against their arch nemesis, but certainly they faltered. You can’t blame [Roberto] Luongo, you can’t blame just one person. You’ve got to blame everybody, from top to bottom. They just weren’t able to show up on the road.”

Asked about the Bruins’ strategy to get to Luongo, Turco said: “The game plan is always the same: Score often, score early. That would certainly be their best asset. Just continue to put pressure on him, take shots. Sometimes, pucks hit goalies that might not be 100 percent confident early in the game. That’s what they need sometimes. I think he’ll actually play really well. I think it’s going to be another tight game here in Vancouver. I know Bruins Nation would love another blowout. … I think it will be a pretty good one.

“They just need to continue to get in front of the net. I don’t think they were doing that early in the series, and certainly on the road. … They’re going to have to fight to get in front of the net. We saw those goals, some tip-ins, some screens. Those types of goals are harder to come by, but you just have to follow through and work to get there.”

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Read More: Marty Turco, Roberto Luongo, Tim Thomas,
Sturm and scrums highlight rousing victory 11.01.08 at 5:37 pm ET
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The Sturm face was proudly on display in the first period

The Sturm face was proudly on display in the first period

Prior to last night’s 5-1 thrashing of the Stars, Bruins coach Claude Julien asked Marco Sturm to “be involved more” following Saturday morning’s pre-game skate.

Sturm and the rest of his teammates were all heavily involved in a thrilling fight-fest that moved me to ask if this was the return of the Big, Bad Bruins – or at least as close as they’ll ever get in the kinder, gentler version of the NHL.

The B’s winger didn’t waste any time obliging — and he did so without any need for Draconian punishments like a punitive benching or a red-faced tirades from his hockey coach.

Sturm ended a seven-game scoreless streak with a slapper from the left face-off circle just 2:41 into the first period off a nice behind-the-net dish from rookie Blake Wheeler. The score was Sturm’s second strike of the season and the amazing ninth time this season in 12 games that the Black and Gold have scratched first blood.

The assist on Sturm’s first goal was also the first helper of Wheeler’s NHL career to go along with the three goals he’s scored over the first dozen games. Sturm added a third period tally to give him the two-goal evening, and the move to pair Sturm with David Krejci appears to be paying immediate dividends all around.

“It was nice. He needed to react, and not just react but find his game,” said a satisfied Julien after the game. “I thought [Sturm] played better tonight and he was in the right spot, even on that last goal he was in the right place and he buried [his opportunities]. I thought he was a better player tonight.”

The B’s ended up taking the 5-1 decision over the Stars in a very chippy, conentious, entertaining Old Time Hockey-style game that featured Stars agitator Steve Ott twice refusing to drop both his stick and the gloves when Shawn Thornton and Shane Hnidy circled round looking for a fights — one after a hit aiming for Stephane Yelle’s leg that Lucic later termed “gutless”. Hnidy actually dropped his stick and his gloves to go with Ott, but the 6-foot, 193-pounder thought better of it each time and held his stick vertically to shield himself from his Black and Gold challenger. 

Eventually Andrew Ference and Sean Avery dropped the gloves after the Bruins defenseman — who earned the Third Star in the win and continues his impressive early season play – leveled Ott with a clean open ice hit in the third period. That hit also turned out to be a big turning point in a game that was still squarely in the close category in the third period. 

In the end, the combative game had 177 penalty minutes and seven misconducts and made many spectators wish these two teams played each other again during the regular season.

–The Bruins much-maligned penalty kill unit also looked better after six successful kills of Dallas PP’s throughout Saturday night’s game — a testament to the work they’ve put in to exert more pressure on the points while also just getting tougher aroun their own net.

Julien said before the game that the solution to the PK’s problems were pretty simple: “It’s just being proactive. The puck has to go all the way down [to the other end of the rink] and we’re soft on the puck when it comes time for scoring chances. These are the areas that I think will improve our penalty kill and will improve our goal production.”

For two periods Ott and Sean Avery attempted to draw penalties from annoyed Bruins skaters and their aggravating tactics actually allowed the Stars to gain some man advantage opportunities in the second period. But their agitating, sandpaper ways finally backfired on them and the rest of their Stars teammates in the third period. Avery leveled Milan Lucic from behind midway through the third in the final coup de grace of what been a pretty dirty production of hockey put on by both Avery and Ott all night – and all heck broke loose at that point.

Marc Savard came to the aid of the fallen Lucic and started pounding on Avery, and then both players worked over the Vogue intern while separate bouts involving Shane Hnidy and Mark Stuart took place. Savard, Lucic, Hnidy Mark Stuart, Ott, Avery, Matt Niskanen [how did a peace-loving Fin with zero penalty minutes headed into tonight get involved in all this?] were all done for the night when they each got 10-minute misconducts with less than nine minutes to play.

Apparently even some of Ott and Avery’s teammates had a serious problem with some of the underhanded things they were pulling out on the ice in the third period.

“Tonight it seemed to be idiotic,” said Stars elder statesman Mike Modano. “It’s stupid. It’s one of the more embarrassing things I have seen, on the ice and involved with the fans. In 20 years, I haven’t seen anything like it. If that’s what we’re going for, maybe I need to find myself an office job.”

The Stars were shaking their heads and dropping F-bombs in their locker room while the Bruins seemed a tighter, more resolute bunch after standing together and sticking up for each other.

“It was good to see everybody pile in their and come to my aid, but most importantly we got the win,” said Lucic. “In the end we all stuck up for each other and it’s only going to make us stronger going down the road. It was a good character game and a good character win for us. Savvy came in here after the game saying that he was a killer, but obviously it was nice what he went out there and did.

“Hnidy said to me as we were coming off the ice that it felt like a junior hockey scrum out there, so yeah it felt like Old Time Hockey,” added Lucic. “What we need to do is bottle this up and make sure we have some of it for Thursday [against the Leafs.]” 

–Somewhat overlooked in a penalty-filled Saturday night flashback to the glorious days of the Big Bad Bruins was the work of goaltender Tim Thomas, who made 35 saves in the 5-1 victory and was again rock-solid between the pipes. The win was his fourth consecutive start for the Bruins and it would seem he has clearly wrapped up the starter’s role with the B’s. The All-Star goaltender mused that the sketchy Stars must have received the wrong scouting report on the Bruins when they attempted to pull the McFilthy and McNasty routine with penalty box buddies Ott and Avery.

“We’re a clean team, but we’re not going to let anybody push us around or play dirty with us,” said Thomas. “I think we did a good job of sticking up for ourselves and showing what kind of character we have. I don’t know what kind of scouting report they had on us, but I think they picked the wrong team to try to do that to.”

Flyers goalie Ron Hextall was one guy that never saw a brawl he didn't want to be a part of...

Flyers goalie Ron Hextall was one guy that never saw a brawl he didn't want to be a part of...

The B’s netminder actually thought he might get involved in the third period donnybrook when beleaguered Stars goalie Marty Turco skated out toward center ice following the Avery hit from behind on Lucic. Turco has had a terrible season thus far, and it could have been he was looking for the rare-but-always-entertaining goalie scrap. The Dallas goaltender stopped, however, once he saw Thomas make a move near the pile of skating pugilists.

“It’s actually some of the hardest games to play because you get your adrenaline going a little bit even though you try to stay as calm and even-keeled as you can be,” said Thomas. “When Fer [Andrew Ference] got hit and then stood up for himself I got a little excited, and it’s hard to finish out a game that way.

“I wasn’t going to let [Turco] into the pile. It looked to me like he was going to try to get into the pile, so that’s why I skated over to the other side of it,” added Thomas. “I think he’s the one that made the suggestion by coming to center ice, and I just responded by getting over to the other side of the pile and saying ‘I don’t think you’re going to go any further’ and he stayed there. I can’t remember a game like that for a long time…maybe the AHL. I haven’t experienced  anything quite like that before.”

–Below I’ve included the transcript of Mike Modano’s comments provided by the crack Bruins media relations staff following Saturday night’s game. It seems that the longtime Dallas Stars forward was none too pleased with his team’s careless lack of discipline in a game that was still close in the third period. 

Modano and dumb penalties don't get along...

Modano and dumb penalties don't get along...

DALLAS STARS FORWARD MIKE MODANO
On the team’s identity


Tonight it seemed to be idiotic.  It’s stupid.  It’s one of the more embarrassing things I have seen, on the ice and involved with the fans.  In twenty years that I haven’t seen anything like it.  If that’s what we’re going for maybe I need to find myself an office job. 

On the physicality of the game…
Yeah, I mean it got out of hand, it was still a 2-1 game and then we find ourselves blowing it again, putting ourselves in trouble with dumb penalties and dumb situations.  That’s kind of the trend it’s been all season.

On the cause of the frustration…
There isn’t any mental toughness, that’s kind of one of the big things.  Everything we’re letting get to us.  We’re letting the refs get involved in the game with us.  We’re spending more energy on them than the details of winning the game.  It’s another thing that’s been a bad part of our game.

On the goaltending performance of both Tobias Stephan and Marty Turco…
They’re doing about as best as you can ask for them, but the quality of chances are just like doorstep goals and outnumbered rushes again.  You can put two goalies in there; those are still going to go in.  You allow those quality type of chances, I don’t care who you have in net.

On trying to fix the team…
Well, I don’t know if you can put your finger on something.  Moving the puck, I don’t know, practice skating, getting shots on the net, things like that.  Defending is probably first and foremost.  We come off a couple of hard practices and we have one of our best defensive games of the season against Minnesota.  Back to the same old.  Less is more sometimes.  Just getting the puck out and then getting it in.  Hopefully your forecheck can create something for you and go from there.  To look to create, there aint nothing there.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Dallas Stars, Marc Savard
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