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Milan Lucic calls Alexei Emelin a ‘chicken,’ denies spearing Canadiens defenseman 03.24.14 at 11:22 pm ET
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One of the biggest challenges the Bruins faced in their 2-1 shootout loss to the Canadiens Monday night was keeping their cool. After the game, Milan Lucic still hadn’t quite cooled down.

Lucic took a first-period hip check from Alexei Emelin in the first period of the game. The hit was clean, but Lucic asserted after the game that Emelin was trying to take out his knees. Zdeno Chara went after Emelin for the play, earning a roughing minor.

“Whether it’s fair, legal or whatever you want to call it, if he wasn’t scared, he would stand up and hit me and not go after my knees,” Lucic said. “It just shows how big of a chicken he is that he needs to go down like that to take me down. It shows what kind of player he is, and on my end, you know you’ve got to keep your guard up at all times.”

That wasn’t the end of Lucic’s interactions with Emelin. In the third period (video here), Lucic skated past Emelin but stuck his stick between the player’s legs and lifted his stick, hitting him in what looked to be the rear end, though initial reactions around the web suggested he may have gotten Emelin in the — let’s say “groin.” Lucic denied the act after the game.

“Just skating by him and that’s all,” he said. “People are trying to say I speared him. I did not spear him, so that’s it.”

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Alexei Emelin, Milan Lucic,
Shawn Thornton on D&C: ‘We like the group we have’ 03.05.14 at 11:01 am ET
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Bruins forward Shawn Thornton talked with Dennis & Callahan on Wednesday about the NHL trade deadline, his 100th fight and more. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

With the NHL trade deadline looming, Thornton said that there hasn’t been as much discussion in the locker room because of the Olympic break.

“€œWe haven’t really talked about it much this year,”€ Thornton said. “I think €”because there hasn’t been a lot of chatter with the Olympics, it took a lot of focus away from the deadline. Usually there’€™s a two-week buildup to it, to be completely honest. This year you came out of the Olympics six days later. So there hasn’t been a lot of talk.”

Thornton likes the team and is fine with the way it is, but he knows there could be players traded by Wednesday’s 3 p.m. deadline.

“We’€™re a pretty good team, but I know that Peter [Chiarelli] is always looking to improve,” Thornton said. “And you can always get better, so we’€™ll see what happens by 3 today.”

Added Thornton: “We all really like each other, we like the group we have. We’€™re a pretty tight-knit group. We’€™re still winning some hockey games this year, so I’€™m OK with it.”

During Tuesday night’s 4-1 victory over the Panthers, Thornton got into his 100th career fight. The fight with Krys Barch was initiated to spark the team and stick up for Milan Lucic, who fought Barch in the first period.

“€œWe were kind of flat in the second period,” Thornton said. “Looch can handle himself, obviously, but I didn’t like that he went after Looch in the first shift. Krys Barch is a, he’€™s a really good guy. I played with him. … I actually kind of taught him how to fight 11 years ago in the minors.”

The Bruins’ top line of David Krejci, Jarome Iginla and Lucic performed very well on Tuesday with Krejci recording a hat trick and Iginla scoring the fourth goal. Thornton noted that the trio is unlike any other in the NHL.

“€œWe rely heavily on those guys and they consistently perform,”€ Thornton said. “And it’€™s funny because if there’s one game where they don’t get a point it’s like the sky’s falling. Everyone’€™s chirping. They’ve been unbelievable for us all year. … They bring things to the table that other teams don’€™t have. You don’t have two power forwards that are that tough and score.”

Read More: Krys Barch, Milan Lucic, Peter Chiarelli, Shawn Thornton
Bruins beat Canucks for first time since 2011 Stanley Cup finals 02.04.14 at 9:39 pm ET
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Bruins forward Daniel Paille heads in for a second-period goal during Tuesday's 3-1 victory over the Canucks. (AP)

Bruins forward Daniel Paille heads in for a second-period goal during Tuesday’s 3-1 victory over the Canucks. (AP)

Though it didn’t mean as much as their last win over the Canucks, the Bruins beat Vancouver on Tuesday at TD Garden for the first time since the 2011 Stanley Cup finals. The Bruins picked up a 3-1 victory, good for their sixth win in their last seven games.

Vancouver native Milan Lucic made it 1-0 at 5:12 of the first period, with David Krejci passing it back to him while on a 2-on-2 with Jarome Iginla. Lucic finished off the play by beating Roberto Luongo stick side from the slot. Iginla added to the lead with a power-play goal off a feed from Zdeno Chara in the second.

Newly acquired Canucks defenseman Raphael Diaz beat Tuukka Rask with a slap shot on a waffling puck in the second at 11:28 of the second, but a Daniel Paille breakaway goal off a stretch pass from Johnny Boychuk increased the Bruins’ lead back to two.

The game was the third played between the B’s and Canucks since the 2011 Cup finals, with Luongo making his first start at TD Garden since Game 6 of the series. He was out dueled Tuesday by Rask, who made 27 saves.

Tuesday marked Chara’s last game with the team before he leaves for Sochi to be Slovakia’s flag-bearer in the opening ceremonies of the Olympics Friday. The B’s have two games left before the break, as they’ll play in St. Louis on Thursday and host the Senators Saturday.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

– Boychuk was a beast, starting the play that gave Paille his goal and providing a bruising presence. Boychuk found Paille coming onto the ice with the B’s stuck in their zone and sent a pass from the hashmarks of Boston’s zone to Paille at the Canucks blue line. Paille took it from there, beating Luongo low with a stick-side backhander.

That wasn’t all Boychuk did, as he used his body well on Canucks forwards, most notably crushing David Booth multiple times, including a massive hit along the wall in the Vancouver zone late in the second period.

The Bruins will need a couple more performances like that from Boychuk before the Olympic break, as the 30-year-old will be the elder statesman of Boston’s blue line for the next two games without Chara.

– Speaking of Chara, it was good for B’s to get two points in his last game with them before the break. The next two won’t be easy, as the B’s, who are already without Dennis Seidenberg, will be down their best two defensemen. David Warsofsky will play the next two games after being recalled Monday and sitting Tuesday.

– Though his line didn’t have the prettiest night, Paille continued to contribute. The tripping penalty he drew in the first period was the fourth penalty he’s drawn in the last four games, while he continues to use his speed (or, as was the case Tuesday, a fortunate line change) to create chances. Paille has eight goals through 48 games this season after registering 10 in 46 contests last season.

– Iginla has points in five of his last six games, registering three goals and eight assists for 11 points over that span. His assist on Lucic’s goal was the 600th helper of his career.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

Brad Marchand missed out on a couple of goals in the second period. What appeared to be the Bruins’ third goal was waved off after it was determined Torey Krug obstructed Luongo. Krug was in front of the net and fell into Luongo as Reilly Smith took the puck behind the net and fed Marchand, with Marchand having half the net open with Luongo down. Luongo immediately argued that the goal should be disallowed, which it was.

Later in the period, Marchand hit the post on a backhand bid in front.

– Statistically speaking, Patrice Bergeron‘s line has cooled off since its torrid stretch in mid-to-late January. The trio of Bergeron, Marchand and Smith now has gone four games without producing a goal.

Read More: Daniel Paille, Jarome Iginla, Milan Lucic, Roberto Luongo
Seahawks fan Milan Lucic compares P.K. Subban to Richard Sherman, Broncos to 2007 Patriots 02.03.14 at 1:20 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — The best sports analyst during Bruins’ media availability on any given day isn’t a member of the media, but rather Milan Lucic, so he was happy to discuss his hometown-ish SeahawksSuper Bowl victory when chatting with reporters following Monday’s practice.

Lucic, who grew up in Vancouver and has “converted” to being a Patriots fan, spent the earlier years of his life rooting for the nearby Seahawks and continues to pull for them as his “NFC team.”

It was in a conversation about the Seahawks Monday that loud and proud Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman came up, and whether there is a player like Sherman — among the best at what they do, and happy to let you know — in the NHL. Though Brad Marchand would seem to be a candidate, Lucic said the closest comparison would be Canadiens defenseman and reigning Norris Trophy winner P.K. Subban.

“As far as cockiness? Well I mean there are a lot of guys who are definitely overconfident and stuff like that,” Lucic said. “I mean, Boston, you can almost kind of look at a guy like Subban. Everyone loves to hate him, but he’s still good at what he does, as far as being a defenseman. He won the Norris last year. As far as we go in Boston, I guess you could say he’s kind of a comparison.”

As for the game itself, Lucic said he was in awe of Seattle’s defense, which took the ball away four times and limited Peyton Manning‘s offense to just eight points in a blowout win. He compared the Broncos‘ high-powered offense missing out on the Lombardi Trophy to the Patriots in 2007-08, as it too set records but failed to reach its ultimate goal.

“Yes. Yes,” Lucic said when asked if he was surprised to see Seattle handle Denver the way it did. “Especially a safety off the first play, and it kept going downward for the Broncos after that, but you know what? It was pretty impressive to see Seattle’s defense and what they can do. They kind of just bull-rushed the Broncos offense and [Denver] didn’t have really any answer for it. It still amazes me how in most sports, the best defense usually comes [out] on top over the best offense.

“I guess from the Broncos standpoint, you could kind of compare it to the ’07-’08 Pats, having all that success and all those touchdowns and points, but they lose the big game. I felt that here my rookie year, so I’m sure they’re really disappointed, but like I said, it’s great to see that defense does win championships.”

Read More: Milan Lucic, P.K. Subban, Richard Sherman,
Milan Lucic has replayed shocking end to Stanley Cup finals ’100 times’ in his mind 01.18.14 at 5:10 pm ET
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Johnny Boychuk, Tuukka Rask, Dave Bolland

The Bruins and Blackhawks are set to meet for the first time since the Stanley Cup finals. (AP)

CHICAGO — The Bruins are back in Chicago for the first time in Stanley Cup finals, and though the series ended at TD Garden, returning to the Windy City brings back plenty of memories.

“I don’t think it’s weird; it’s nice to be back,” Claude Julien said after the team practiced at Johnny’€™s Ice House. “Last year, although when you don’t win, it’s a bittersweet situation. If anything when you take time to look back it was some really good hockey played, great games, overtime in a lot of them and everything else. I thought it was a well-played battle. Hopefully for the betterment of the game you hope it was appreciated.”

Of course the Bruins wish the results could have been different. The banged-up B’s limped to the finish line as they blew a one-goal lead in allowing the Blackhawks to score two goals in 17 seconds and end the series in shocking fashion.

“The last minute, minute and 15, I’ve replayed in my mind 100 times since that moment,” Lucic said. “Obviously there are a lot of questions. [The game-winner] goes right off the post and right back to [Dave] Bolland‘s stick. You always think ‘What could you have done?’

“And it’s not just Game 6. You look at Game 1, we’re up 3-1 with eight minutes left and they were able to tie it and win it. Then we were up 2-1 in the series and we don’t take care of business in Game 4. Those are the things that haunt you in the summertime and replay it over in your mind. It sucks thinking about it and you want to do everything you can to move past it. Obviously, we’ve done our best to play well this year and move past it.’€

To a man — and along the lines of what they said during the series — Sunday’s meeting between the Bruins and Blackhawks won’t be anything like the two meetings the Bruins and Canucks have had since the 2011 finals. Where the Bruins and Canucks hated — and clearly still hate — each other, the B’s and Blackhawks turned in a great six games of hockey, with perhaps the most disappointing part of the series the fact that it didn’t go to seven.

“€œI would definitely say it’s different [than with the Canucks],” Lucic said. “There was so much more I guess you say chippiness in the Vancouver series where bad blood, still, as you saw in the last game, carried over. There isn’t as much talk heading into this game tomorrow, but we both know what’s on the line.

‘€”I wouldn’t say there was any other series [like last year's] where there was that mutual respect. I’m sure once the puck drops and we get going, that emotional level will be back at it pretty quick.”

Julien agrees, saying he wouldn’t expect to see cheap shots from the players in this rematch like there have been in the rematches with the Canucks. Patrice Bergeron, who wouldn’t have even been able to play in a Game 7 given his injuries suffered in the series, says the respect between the two teams is too great.

“I’€™ve also talked with a couple guys that played on the team as well and that’€™s what we basically said, it was a great series, a hard fought series but still lots of respect on both sides,” Bergeron said. “I thought it was for fans, I thought it was a great series to watch also.”

For more Bruins coverage, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Claude Julien, Milan Lucic, Patrice Bergeron,
Loui Eriksson cleared for contact 01.08.14 at 9:19 pm ET
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Bruins forward Loui Eriksson has been cleared for contact, Bruins coach Claude Julien told reporters Wednesday. Eriksson took contact in Wednesday’s practice after returning to the ice last week.

Eriksson is recovering from his second concussion of the season, which he suffered on Dec. 7 against the Penguins. The veteran winger has missed a total of 19 games this season between his two concussions. Julien told reporters that Eriksson is not expected to play Thursday against the Kings.

Both Milan Lucic (illness) and Jordan Caron (back) were reportedly back on the ice for Wednesday’s practice after missing Tuesday’s game against the Ducks.

For more on the Bruins, visit weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Jordan Caron, Loui Eriksson, Milan Lucic,
Andy Brickley on M&M: Bruins ‘have to replace Dennis Seidenberg with a guy from outside the organization’ at 1:00 pm ET
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Andy Brickley

Andy Brickley

NESN Bruins analyst Andy Brickley made his weekly appearance with Mut & Merloni on Wednesday, following the Bruins’ 5-2 loss to the Ducks on Tuesday night in the first of three games on the West Coast this week. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

“I was actually impressed with the way the Bruins played in the first period, when you talk about how good is Anaheim and how good in Boston,” Brickley said. “But their penalty-killing just totally let them down last night. It will be another stern test on Thursday [vs. the Kings], and probably even a tougher one on Saturday [vs. the Sharks].”

The Bruins appear to struggling to adjust since the loss of defenseman Dennis Seidenberg on Dec. 27 to a torn MCL and ACL in his right knee.

“The biggest void on this team right now is clearly the loss of Dennis Seidenberg,” Brickley said. “They’re going to try in the short term to continue to win games and put some points on the board in his absence within the organization to make up for his loss. But long term, and if they think they have a chance to win another Stanley Cup or get to a Stanley Cup final, there’s no question they’re going to have to replace Dennis Seidenberg with a guy from outside the organization.”

The Bruins have had a dip defensively and most notably on the penalty kill since Seidenberg went down.

“I think [Seidenberg's absence] has a lot to do with it,” Brickley said. “I don’t know if it’s a one-to-one correlation with that kind of lack of getting the job done when it comes to killing penalties in his absence, but yeah, he’s one of those guys that’s got real good gaps, he’s able to hold that defensive blue line better than most defenseman, he wins way more than his share of one-on-one battles when the puck’s up for grabs, he’s a good decision-maker, when to be aggressive, when not to be, when to hold your position, he’s real good with stick position, he blocks a ton of shots when killing penalties, he gets to the loose puck so there’s no second and third opportunities when the rebound’s are there. So he does all the stuff that you need a quality penalty-killer on the defensive side [to do].

“In his absence, you still have other guys that can do the job, but he’s one of your premier penalty-killers. He’s just an awesome player in this system, with this group, in his role. When you lose a guy like that, you still have guys like [Johnny] Boychuck and [Adam] McQuaid that are pretty good in that area but not as good as a Dennis Seidenberg.”

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Read More: Andy Brickley, Dennis Seidenberg, Milan Lucic, Patric Bergeron
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