Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Milan Lucic’
Lucic back in black 01.07.10 at 7:39 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Milan Lucic returned to the Bruins lineup on Thursday night against the Chicago Blackhawks at TD Garden. He missed the last 18 games with a high left ankle sprain, suffered on Nov. 25 at Minnesota.

Lucic had returned and played just four games before suffering his second significant injury of the season. he had two goals and three assists in 10 games this season.

Read More: Bruins, Milan Lucic, NHL,
Chiarelli: ‘Looks like a challenge all year’ 11.27.09 at 1:31 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

It’s hard to blame Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli for feeling ‘woe is me’ when it comes to the mounting injuries of his club.

The Bruins lost Marc Savard for 15 games with a broken foot and Milan Lucic for 14 games with a broken finger. Tim Thomas has missed the last six games now with a minor undisclosed injury.

Savard made his return on Wednesday and Lucic had been back four games and the Bruins appeared to be hitting their stride with a four-game winning streak. But you never know when you’re going to catch an edge at the wrong time.

Just ask Lucic, who caught the tip of his left skate in the ice in Minnesota on Wednesday and fell awkwardly to the ice. The diagnosis – out at least a month with a left high ankle sprain.

“It is consistent with the rest of the year,” bemoaned Chiarelli before Friday’s matinee. “It looks like it is going to be a challenge all year. All teams have their challenges but this is pretty consistent.”

Asked if he feared the worst, Chiarelli was philosophical.

“You do that by nature as a general manager,” he said. “You also learn to wait. Usually the report on the injury initially is really, really bad. That applies every time. You learn to wait until the next morning, then the following morning. As is the case, it got better this morning.”

But it’s coach Claude Julien who has to deal with shuffling the lines, which included slotting in Vladimir Sobokta on Friday afternoon.

“Well, it’s something we’ve been dealing with since the beginning of the year and injuries are part of the game,” Julien said. “We just go forward with what we’ve got. That’s always been the case and that’s what we have to deal with right now. Obviously, you lose a pretty good player who has a pretty good impact on games at times so we’ve been without him for a month and we’ll have to deal with it for a little longer now.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Milan Lucic,
Looch out a month at 12:13 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

Bruins power forward Milan Lucic will miss up to a month with a high left ankle sprain. Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli made the announcement Friday morning before the Bruins matinee contest with New Jersey.

Lucic was back just four games before injuring his ankle on Wednesday night in Minnesota. Lucic caught his left skate in the ice and fell back awkwardly.

‘€œCertainly when I saw the injury happen, you look at the stress on the lower knee and the ankle, I certainly expected worse,” Chiarelli said. ‘€œI think that if you look at it real close, he broke the fall with his hand. That probably took some stress off of the knee.’€

Lucic missed 14 games with a fractured finger on Oct. 16 in Dallas. He has been limited to just 10 games this season, with two goals and three assists.

‘€œI am sure he disappointed. We get him back for three or four games, now he is gone for a month.’€

Read More: Boston Bruins, Milan Lucic, NHL,
Milan Lucic on D&H 11.24.09 at 2:44 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Bruins forward Milan Lucic, who returned to the ice last week after missing roughly a month with a broken finger, joined the Dale & Holley Show on Tuesday afternoon to discuss the recent improved play of the Bruins, the impact of Marc Savard’s return and his decision to sign a long-term deal to stay in Boston.

A transcript of highlights is below. To listen to the complete interview, click here.

The Bruins are starting to look a little better. Are you guys happy with the effort the last few games?

Yeah, definitely. We were able to get on a little bit of a roll here, especially on the road, it’€™s a lot tougher winning on the road than it is winning at home, so for myself it’€™s just nice to get back in the lineup, get some wins, and move up in the standings a bit.

When you guys were struggling, did it ever cross your mind that effort was a problem? Would you simplify it and say yes, we just weren’€™t trying hard enough, was that the issue?

I think it was a consistency and ever since I’€™ve been back here the last few games I think that’€™s what we’€™ve improved on, giving a consistent work ethic throughout the game. We’€™ve been able to apply a full 60 minutes of playing hard, and sticking to the game plan, I think that’€™s what’€™s made us successful, and that’€™s what made us get the ball rolling again and get some wins.

How hard is it to come back off a long term injury and how long it takes to knock the rust off? Savard admitted he was a little rusty last night, you slipped right back into scoring goals when you came back into the lineup. Did you feel rusty?

I felt pretty good when I came back in. Me and Savard, our injuries were a little bit different. I was still able to skate, I had the broken finger there so my conditioning was still good and all that type of stuff. They did a really good job keeping me in shape ‘€“ the trainers, and whoever I was working with ‘€“ so when I came back, my conditioning wouldn’€™t be a problem. I’€™ve been able to fit back in nicely with that, and for myself when you’€™re not in the lineup for a long time, you’€™re just really excited and anxious to get back and I think that’€™s what I’€™m doing, playing with a lot of excitement and having a lot of fun.

Anybody who has ever played with Marc Savard is usually very happy about it, those numbers go up when Marc Savard is on your side. What does he do that maybe a lot of us don’€™t see or that you have to know by playing with him?

Firstly, he wants the puck. He’€™s a guy that’€™s a puck possession guy and he wants it all the time. So he’€™s a guy that’€™s very demanding of himself and his line-mates that he wants results and he wants to go out there and contribute every night getting goals and assists, and the thing about him is he’€™s got eyes all around his head, it’€™s funny if you get open for him, he’€™ll find you even when you’€™re not looking at him. That’€™s what makes him such a great player, and for myself I was happy to play with him and have such a successful year with him last year.

Is it kind of like that off the ice too? If you’€™re walking somewhere and Savard is not looking, do you always feel like he cans see you? Does he always have that kind of vision?

Yeah, he’€™s always aware of his surroundings, that’€™s for sure.

This year was the last year of your entry level contract, and you made a commitment to this team. You signed a three-year contract extension with the Bruins through 2012-2013, why was it important to you to make the commitment and stay here?

It was an easy decision for me, I really wanted to stick around in Boston, I really liked how things were going and I really did like the organization and all the people around it. It’€™s a great city, it’€™s a great sports town and the fans are really another huge reason why I wanted to stay. They’€™ve been real great to us and to me since I’€™ve been with the Bruins, and it was just an easy decision to want to stay in Boston.

Read More: Marc Savard, Milan Lucic,
Bergeron emerging as a quiet Bruins leader 10.28.09 at 3:09 pm ET
By   |  12 Comments

WILMINGTON, Mass. — A highly respected hockey voice recently stressed that the leadership of both Patrice Bergeron and Mark Recchi as two key pieces in the recent turnaround of the Bruins. It’s been those two players, along with captain Zdeno Chara, that have helped grease the wheels of Boston’s resurgence, but there’s also a growing measure of influence from the young voices within the dressing room.

The loss of players such as Stephane Yelle, P.J. Axelsson and Aaron Ward have no doubt left a vacancy in terms of veteran influence within the dressing room, but coach Claude Julien said he’s already convinced that those important breaches have been filled. Young players are stepping up, and emerging leaders are picking their spots to help push along the direction of the club.

To hear Julien explain it, Bergeron is something akin to those old E.F. Hutton financial commercials. When Bergeron speaks, everybody listens — and that’s only been amplified this season as the 24-year-old has again staked claim to his rightful place as one of the brightest spots on Boston’s roster. The Bruins have taken points in four of their last five games, and young skaters such as Bergeron have everything to do with that.

“We talked about the guys we lost in the last year: the Yelles, the Axellsons, the Wards. They were pretty good presences in the dressing room, but at the same time other guys have stepped up,” Julien said. “We’ve asked other guys to step up into those roles in the dressing room, and we had some guys that were ready to take over. It’s been good and getting better, and it’s a transition that needs to be made.

“There’s no point in naming one or two guys. For the most part, the young guys want to do their jobs. The older guys: Z and the Ferences and the Recchis have been there for a long time and they’re going to help out along the way. Bergie is a quiet leader and not necessarily the rah-rah type, but every once in a while he’ll speak. When he does, they listen because he doesn’t speak that often and he doesn’t speak for nothing. So you expect some kind of leadership from those guys, and Marco Sturm has also been a quiet leader. He speaks when it’s time to speak. What you see from them [in the media] and what we see behind closed doors might be a little different.”

The old Bergeron has appeared on the ice where he’s tied for tops in the team with seven points through the first 10 games, and that appears to also be shining through in Boston’s new leadership structure this season.

‘€” Don’t expect Milan Lucic to begin dropping the gloves and transforming into the Incredible Looch when he returns from his broken right index finger. The hulking left winger has been working out and skating on his own, but said that it took at least “two months” for his finger to stabilize the last time he broke a knuckle/finger on his left hand.

That means Lucic won’t be slipping into fight mode for a minimum of several weeks, and probably longer, after the finger is healed enough to suit up again for the B’s.

“You’ve got to be smart about it, protect it a little bit and wait for [the finger] to solidify before you go back to everything you used to do before,” Lucic said. “I definitely didn’t fight right after I came back the last time, and it look a little bit before it was ready to go.”

Lucic had only the one fighting major came when he rearranged Jay Harrison’s facial structure in the blowout win over the Hurricanes in the B’s second game of the season. It may be quite some time before his next one, and there remains the question of how much Lucic will throw down given his value to the hockey team as a top line player and his value in dollars given his newly signed long-term contract.

‘€” There’s been a lot of talk about the incoming Devils before they come into the TD Banknorth Garden Thursday night, and naturally most of the conversation centered around the trap and Martin Brodeur. Both coach and players paid tribute to the disciplined — albeit sleepy — trapping style that New Jersey has become synonymous with, and the legendary goaltender at the end of Jersey’s layered defense.

B’s goalie Tim Thomas called Brodeur’s hybrid style the “one-legged butterfly”, and said that he’s taken plenty from watching the four-time Vezina Trophy winner over the years. Just don’t ask Thomas if he ever watches Brodeur when he’s playing against him, because the reigning Vezina Trophy winner clearly doesn’t get caught up in the individual goalie matchups.

“The truth is he’s a great goalie that’s been fortunate enough to play with a good team in front of him for his entire career,” Thomas said. “You don’t win Vezinas without a good team in front of you, and the New Jersey Devils have been able to build up a strong core and keep them together the whole time through.

“If you don’t have the right team to play with, then it doesn’t matter what system you have. There’s nothing about his style. He just stops the puck. Everybody talks about my style, but he really has his own style, too. He has a way, way different style from everybody else than I do.”

How would Thomas describe Brodeur’s way different style of “stopping the puck?”

“One-legged butterfly. Half-butterfly. Watch him, he goes down on his right knee all the time. He goes into the butterfly, but that isn’t his first move,” Thomas said. “His first move is to go down halfway and then the butterfly is his second move. If you can do it and cover [the 5-hole] up enough enough, then it’s much easier to get up [tall] off one knee.”

Read More: Milan Lucic, Patrice Bergeron, Tim Thomas,
Lefebvre recalled from Providence Bruins 10.22.09 at 10:30 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

Big winger Guillaume Lefebvre was recalled by the Boston Bruins on Thursday morning and is expected to be available for Thursday night’s game against the Philadelphia Flyers. Lefebvre played for the B’s against the Phoenix Coyotes last weekend on an emergency basis while replacing the injured Milan Lucic, but was sent back down to the Providence Bruins following that game.

Lefebvre had one assist and 42 penalty minutes in five games with the P-Bruins this season and didn’t register anything on the stat line during his one game with Boston last weekend. “Banged up” winger Shawn Thornton was going on the two-game trip with the team through Philadelphia and Ottawa, but Lefebvre’s recall might be a sign that Thornton isn’t quite ready to play.

Lefebvre has two goals and 4 assists along with 13 penalty minutes in 39 games for the Flyers, Penguins and the Bruins through his pro hockey career.

Read More: Guillaume Lefebvre, Milan Lucic, Shawn Thornton,
Lucic out 4-6 weeks with a broken right index finger 10.19.09 at 12:26 pm ET
By   |  9 Comments

WILMINGTON — The Bruins doled out more good news at Monday morning practice when Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli revealed that Milan Lucic had surgery Sunday for a broken right finger, and will miss 4-6 weeks with the injury. Claude Julien corrected the diagnosis at his press availability and revealed that the hulking left forward underwent surgery for a broken right index finger. 

“Anytime you lose a guy like Looch, you’re losing a player that usually has a pretty good impact on the game when he’s on top of it,” said Julien. “It’s certainly going to hurt. I think we saw him more like the player we wanted him to be against Dallas. So it’s going to hurt, but it’s going to give somebody else an opportunity a chance to step.

“We’ve always been a team that’s responded well to that in the past.”

Lucic was placed on long term injured reserve list Sunday amid a flurry of moves by the Bruins, and that requires that the bruising left winger miss at least 10 games and 24 days due to the injury.

“He’ll probably be [out] anywhere between 4-6 weeks. He had surgery on his [finger],” said Chiarelli of Lucic’s injury.

Read More: Milan Lucic, Peter Chiarelli,
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines