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Offense comes back to life in 6-5 shootout loss 03.28.13 at 12:03 am ET
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Because six Bruins failed to beat Peter Budaj in a shootout, the clearest takeaway from the Bruins’ 6-5 loss to Montreal on Wednesday was another blown third-period lead. However, the reason the Bruins had a lead to blow was that the offense came alive for the first time in a week and half, with five different players scoring.

In their last five games before Wednesday, the Bruins had 10 goals (and one of those came in a shootout). Against Montreal, they knocked Carey Price out of the net with four goals in the second period and finished the game with 41 shots.

“It was nice to see us score some goals tonight,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “We’ve been a little dry lately, and we managed to score five, so that was nice to see.”

Perhaps it was a bad omen when Dougie Hamilton was the first Bruin on the board, as they’re now 0-4 when he scores. Still, Hamilton cut Montreal’s lead in half just 39 seconds after P.K. Subban had made it 2-0, and his goal sparked a momentum shift in the Bruins’ direction.

Patrice Bergeron’s line reappeared with a vengeance, recording a total of nine points between Bergeron, Brad Marchand and Tyler Seguin. Each scored a goal, and Bergeron added three assists. Seguin had two and Marchand one.

That was especially encouraging for Marchand, as the second-chance goal he scored to tie the game at two was only his second in the last 12 games. After a shaky start to the game, Nathan Horton also broke a drought, scoring for the first time in six games and only the second time in the last 15.

The Bruins’ last two goals came on rushes, with perfectly timed passes through the slot, but their first three came from persistence on second and third chances. Despite being pulled after allowing four goals on 26 shots, Price made the Bruins work for their first three. They were equal to the challenge, winning races to rebounds and maintaining possession in the zone until they found clear shooting lanes.

Although Bergeron’s line, the Bruins’ most productive this year, ended up playing together by the middle of the game, they didn’t start the night that way. Julien started Daniel Paille with Bergeron and Seguin instead, and Marchand said the change, however brief, helped him.

“Maybe just to let me know I’ve got to simplify a little bit,” Marchand said. “At times, when you play with each other for a while, you start only looking for each other, and try to make pretty plays instead of doing things that work, which is keeping it simple and taking pucks to the net. And that’s what worked for us tonight.”

Read More: Brad Marchand, Dougie Hamilton, Montreal Canadiens,
Trade loss: With Jarome Iginla rumors swirling, B’s blow lead, lose shootout to Habs 03.27.13 at 10:37 pm ET
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Brad Marchand helped the Bruins erase an early 2-0 hole against the Canadiens. (AP)

Brendan Gallagher scored the decisive goal in the sixth round of the shootout as the Canadiens beat the Bruins, 6-5, in overtime Wednesday night at TD Garden. Gallagher also scored once in the third period before the Canadiens tied it with 8.2 seconds left in regulation. The Bruins had a pair of two-goal leads but couldn’t hold on, as they fell a point behind the Canadiens in the Northeast Division. The Bruins went 0-for-6 in the shootout while Gallagher was the only Canadien to score in six tries.

Patrice Bergeron scored a goal and added three assists while Tyler Seguin added a goal and two assists

With his team battling for the top spot in the Northeast Division six floors below, Bruins president Cam Neely went back and forth on the ninth floor, shadowed by security. This led to speculation about whether the Bruins might be ready to pull the trigger on a major trade for Calgary Flames star Jarome Iginla, who was scratched from his game Wednesday night, the first game the 35-year-old has missed since Feb. 2007.

For a second straight game, Claude Julien juggled his lines at the start before reverting midway through the game. And, for the second straight game against a division rival, the Bruins came out flat in the first period. They were held without a shot for the first eight minutes of the game.

With the exception of Seguin, the Canadiens generated most of the energy on the ice in the opening 20 minutes. It paid off for the visitors when former Bruin Michael Ryder got enough on a snap shot from the low slot and beat Tuukka Rask just 4:15 into the game for a 1-0 lead.

The Canadiens appeared to be in the driver’s seat when arch-nemesis P.K. Subban blasted a slap shot from the right point through a screen and past Rask 2:53 into the second period for a 2-0 lead.

Despite falling behind for the fourth straight game, the Bruins did not panic. And as they did on Monday, when they also fell behind by two goals at the start to the Maple Leafs, the Bruins woke up just in time.

It was a rush from Seguin that got things going 30 seconds after the Subban goal. Seguin came flying down the right wing and fired a shot off the crossbar. The puck came down in front of Bergeron. He couldn’t put it in the open net but Dougie Hamilton was in the right place at the right time and drilled a one-timer from between the circles past Price and the comeback was on.

Less than four minutes later, with Julien again rejoining his regular lines, Marchand netted the game-tying goal by battling for position in front of Price and knocking the puck past the Montreal goalie. Marchand, who started the game on the third line with Rich Peverley and Jordan Caron, was reunited with Bergeron and Seguin. It was Seguin who won the battle in the corner and fired the puck in front of the net for Marchand.

After Lars Eller hauled down Shawn Thornton on a rush down the left wing, the Bruins went on the power play. With 14 seconds left on the man advantage, Bergeron potted his 10th of the season to put the Bruins up, 3-2. The play was set up when Zdeno Chara fed Torey Krug, called up earlier in the day. Krug fired a shot from the right point. The shot deflected off Rich Peverley in front and onto the stick of Bergeron who finished it off.

With the Garden crowd still buzzing, David Krejci fed Nathan Horton on a mini-break and Horton beat Price 35 seconds later for a 4-2 lead. After spotting the Canadiens the game’s first three shots in the opening seven minutes, the Bruins outshot Montreal 26-8 and finished with a 26-11 advantage after 40 minutes.

Price was pulled in favor of Peter Budaj to start the third. Andrew Ference drew a hooking penalty and the Bruins had a power play but could generate little momentum. Then moments later, Ryder added his second of the night, drawing the Canadiens within one, 4-3, with just over 16 minutes still left in regulation.

With Hamilton in the penalty box for holding, Budaj kept the Canadiens in the game with a huge save on Gregory Campbell on a shorthanded breakaway with 10 minutes left. Seguin then gave the Bruins huge insurance with a backhander to beat Budaj with just over eight minutes left, putting Boston up, 5-3. The Canadiens made it a one goal game again as the Seguin goal was being announced as Brendan Gallagher got a lucky bounce off the mouth Dennis Sidenberg and beat Rask with 7:42 left. The Bruins killed off their first five shorthanded situations, including an elbowing call on Chara with 4:40 left in regulation.

But a delay of game on Aaron Johnson with 1:27 left, led to a 6-on-4 with Montreal’s empty net. A shot from Subban deflected off the stick of Chara past Rask with 8.2 seconds left to tie the game. Andrei Markov was credited with the goal The Bruins got a power play with 1:20 left in overtime when Alexei Emelin was called for a hooking penalty. Krejci had one final chance to win it but Budaj smothered the shot from the right circle two seconds before the end of overtime.

The Bruins are off Thursday and Friday before visiting Philadelphia for a matinee with the Flyers on Saturday. For more, visit the Bruins team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Cam Neely, Carey Price, Claude Julien
P.J. Stock on D&C: ‘Everyone’s guilty’ of embellishing 03.06.13 at 10:08 am ET
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P.J. Stock

Former Bruin P.J. Stock of Hockey Night in Canada joined Dennis & Callahan on Wednesday to talk about how changes in hockey have led to more embellishment, and how he thinks an openly gay player would be received in the league.

There have been rumors around the web that Canadiens defenseman Josh Gorges would be coming out this week, but according to You Can Play president Patrick Burke, who spoke with the Canadiens, they are untrue. Stock said that in general he thinks the league is ready for a gay player, but that he would have to worry more about taunts from opposing players and fans than about issues in his own locker room.

“I think there would be those jokes, to the opposition, which there are all the time,” Stock said. “In the locker room would be completely different. I think he would be respected and they would be positive jokes. You’re the same 20, 22, 23 guys for a year and you all learn about everybody’s flaws, your pros and cons, and you’re a big family. Yeah, it would be addressed, something that would be talked about, and yeah, you’re 20 guys that shower together all the time, so there’d be a couple jokes here and there, but that wouldn’t be the problem. I would love to see how it would work out, but the opposition is where you get into some situations where it would be interesting to see where other players react. … I hope there’s someone that steps out, I really do.”

On the topic of embellishment, Stock said he understands why Claude Julien was frustrated with the way penalties were called in the Bruins’ loss to Montreal on Sunday, but that the Canadiens don’t dive any more than any other team.

“Everyone does it,” Stock said of diving. “I don’t think any one team does it more than others. Now, there’s certain types of players that might do it more than others, so if you have more of those players on your team, therefore it might happen more often. But the Canadiens in general? I know P.K. Subban adds some flair to when he gets hit, but — I’m a huge Brad Marchand fan. You look at Team Canada, you look at players that can skate, players that have played big in big games — Brad Marchand’s an easy person not to pick, but I think if you’re really going to sit there and look at things, he does so much so well. But does Brad Marchand embellish? Yeah. You’re trying to sell something. … And Claude Julien knows that, and he’s frustrated about what happened the other night, losing [ZdenoChara out for 17 minutes, and they’re losing the game to his arch-rival, to the team that let him go years earlier. But … everyone’s guilty.”

Stock also pointed out that the value of a big hit or a big fight has changed within the game, and that instead of being momentum-changers, those moments are now cause for suspensions. He said he believes that’s why players embellish more now — getting their team a power play is more effective than getting into a fight.

“Goals are what change the game,” Stock said. “Every time there’s a big hit now, you’ve got to re-look at it 15 times to see, did he leave his feet, did he hit his head? And then there’s always some kind of altercation after it, it’s never just a big hit. The way you would change the momentum was you would increase the physical side of play, which would lead to checking, fights, get the crowd into it. Now, unfortunately, you can’t do that as much. Teams don’t have those kind of players and the game just doesn’t allow for it anymore. So the way you change the momentum is by trying to get a power play, which leads to those players embellishing, because how else do you get a power play?”

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Read More: Brad Marchand, Montreal Canadiens, PJ Stock, Zdeno Chara
Tuukka Rask takes the blame in the loss 03.04.13 at 9:55 am ET
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The shot that tied Sunday’s game at 3-3 appeared to be one of those helpless feelings for a goaltender. A long shot from the top of the slot, through a screen and the goalie couldn’t do much about until it was past him.

But when Tuukka Rask allowed Max Pacioretty‘s cannon of a shot to get past him five minutes into the third, he felt like that was on him.

“Obviously, you don’t want that to happen,” Rask said. “I take that third goal—that was a bad goal by me—but then a tough bounce on the fourth, and we couldn’t get back.

“I saw him kind of release it, and that’s all I need to know. I think I was just a little too sloppy. I wasn’t really ready for that shot, I guess, and it just went through me. Those are always the tough ones you want to get back.”

The fourth goal was a mad scramble that started out to the right of Rask and behind the net. The puck was poked out in front where David Desharnais easily pushed it into the open net.

“It didn’t hit me,” Rask said. “I think it hit Pacioretty when he screened me, and then I thought it would bounce in the corner, but then it just trickled on the side of the net. I dove in there, [Andrew Ference] dove in there, everybody dove in there, and then they found a guy on net and he just buried it.”

Both goals occurred with Chara looking on from the penalty box after taking his 17-minute penalty for sticking up for Tyler Seguin.

“You know what, I didn’t even realize he was in the box until I saw him coming out,” Rask said. “I was just focused on the game, I guess, but he makes a big difference, everybody knows it. He’s got that long reach and takes care of the bodies in front of the net. So, obviously, a big difference, yeah.

“We’re known as a team that, we stick for each other, and that was a pretty bad crosscheck there on Segs. Obviously, Z saw that and jumped in. We killed a penalty when it happened, but it sucks to lose him for 20 minutes or so.”

The lesson?

“I don’t think we played that bad in the third,” Rask said. “We got stuck out there for that third goal a bit, but that just happens sometimes. But then they get that tying goal, and the fourth one was just a tough bounce. I think after that fourth goal we were kind of wondering what the heck happened there. On a couple of shifts they got a two-on-one there and stuff like that. I think there’s been a couple of games in the past, too, where we’ve gotten the lead in the third and we don’t play the way we want to, but we just haven’t got caught with goals against us. But, today was different.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Montreal Canadiens, NHL, Tuukka Rask
Claude Julien: ‘Another line or two like [Patrice Bergeron] we would’ve been fine’ at 9:37 am ET
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As big a loss as it appeared losing captain Zdeno Chara for 17 minutes was, Claude Julien opened his press conference after Sunday’s 4-3 loss to the Canadiens saying it wasn’t the key factor.

“Well, it doesn’t help,” Julien said. “Again, we’re a good enough team that that shouldn’t be the factor and it wasn’t. We only gave them four shots in the third period, but two of them ended up in goals. I thought we could have done a better job in the D-zone. The way that they scored their goals was exactly the way they normally score them. I think we could’ve been a little bit more alert.”

Several times during the games, the Bruins appeared to be fighting the puck in their own end, especially Andrew Ference. He had a couple of turnovers and the normally sure-handed Dennis Seidenberg had another. Tuukka Rask picked up Ference and Seidenberg on all of them but couldn’t stop the Canadiens in the third.

“I didn’t feel like we were moving the pucks as well as we can,” Julien said. “Sure, they forecheck well, but for some reason passes weren’t as crisp coming out of our own end on a lot of occasions and it kind of got us in trouble a little bit. When we got the puck out and went and did the same thing in their end, we had our chances too. They were giving us those opportunities as well. I just felt that defensively when there were some breakdowns we weren’t really there to cover their mistakes and pucks ended up in our net.”

Then there was the lack of production from any line besides the top one of Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand and Tyler Seguin.

“That’s just it,” Julien said. “By far, they were our best line tonight. And that’s the unfortunate thing; we didn’t have enough of those other lines going for us. You can’t win big games like that relying on just that one line. We need more out of the other lines and tonight wasn’t a night where we got that. It’s a credit to them, I think Patrice had a great night. Obviously, Marshy with three assists, and Tyler I thought was skating well and competing well. That was a good line for us. Another line or two like that, with that same work ethic, we would’ve been fine.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Montreal Canadiens, NHL
Late hit: Canadiens make Zdeno Chara and Bruins pay 03.03.13 at 10:14 pm ET
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Milan Lucic and the Bruins brought the fight to the Canadiens but came up short. (AP)

Max Pacioretty and David Desharnais scored third period goals under four minutes apart to erase a one-goal deficit after 40 minutes and beat the Bruins, 4-3, Sunday night at TD Garden. The Canadiens overcame a career-high three assists from Brad Marchand to avenge a 2-1 loss to the Bruins on Feb. 6 in Montreal. The win also gives the Canadiens 32 points, two more than the second-place Bruins in the Eastern Conference. The Bruins had their six-game winning streak snapped and lost for just the third time this season in regulation, falling to 14-3-2 on the season.

The game was highlighted by several fights, including one involving Zdeno Chara. The Bruins captain was lost for 17 minutes late in the second period and over half of the third period when he fought Alexei Emelin, who moments earlier hit Tyler Seguin.

The Canadiens jumped out to a 1-0 lead when Tomas Plekanec took a centering pass from former Bruin Michael Ryder and partially fanned on the shot. But Plekanec got just enough of the puck to throw off Rask, who had the puck trickle past him just 21 seconds after Andrew Ference went off for an interference penalty.

The Bruins then turned up the intensity, thanks in large part to a big forecheck from Milan Lucic. Tyler Seguin tied the game when he took a pass from Patrice Bergeron and beat Peter Budaj. But the tie game lasted only 16 seconds as on the next rush up the ice, Dasharnais centered a puck for Pacioretty. The puck never reached Pacioretty and instead went off the stick of Johnny Boychuk and past Rask for a 2-1 Canadiens lead after 20 minutes. The Bruins set the tone, however, out-hitting Montreal, 15-8, in the opening period.

The Bruins dominated the second period from nearly every aspect, including the penalty kill. The Canadiens had a 5-on-3 power play for 70 seconds but thanks to zone clears by Lucic and Hamilton, the Bruins were able to kill off the entire two-man advantage, allowing just one shot on goal in the process.

Just prior to the two-man advantage, the Bruins reclaimed the lead on goals by Patrice Bergeron and Dougie Hamilton. Seguin fed Bergeron at the right post. Bergeron tried to stuff the shot past Budaj and finally got some help when Montreal defenseman Andrei Markov, crashing the net to help, kicked the puck past his own goalie with his left skate to tie the game, 2-2.

The Bruins took their only lead of the night just over five minutes later when Hamilton put himself on the low right of Budaj and turned his upper body just in time to take a pass from Marchand. Hamilton one-timed the shot from the bad angle past Budaj for a 3-2 lead.

The turning point of the game would come with 4:25 left in the second. Seguin was skating through the neutral zone with the puck when Emelin checked him to the ice. Seguin went down immediately, holding his left side and skating off slowing to the dressing room. Seconds later, Chara took revenge with a devastating check on Emelin, sparking a one-sided fight between the two. Chara was assessed a two-minute instigating penalty, five-minute fighting major and a 10-minute misconduct, adding up to 17 minutes of lost ice time for the Bruins top defenseman. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Dougie Hamilton, Montreal Canadiens
Tyler Seguin takes a hit from Alexei Emelin, Zdeno Chara takes revenge that costs 17 minutes at 9:30 pm ET
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Montreal’s Alexei Emelin hit Tyler Seguin with a check in the neutral zone late in the second period.

Bruins captain Zdeno Chara was on the ice and saw Seguin go down in a heap, holding his left side. Later in the same shift, Chara blew up Emelin with a check, that resulted in a fight between the two.

Chara was tagged with two minutes for instigating, five for fighting and 10 minutes for misconduct. In other words, the cost of sticking up for Seguin, who returned to the bench just moments later, was 17 minutes of ice time.

Read More: Alexei Emelin, Boston Bruins, Montreal Canadiens, NHL
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