Big Bad Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Montreal Canadiens’
Benoit Pouliot saw Canadiens collapse coming, sees promising postseason with Bruins 04.10.12 at 2:03 pm ET
By   |  3 Comments

WILMINGTON — Benoit Pouliot‘s last postseason was a disaster. Bruins fans know that.

Though he set what was, at the time, a career-high 30 points for the Canadiens, Pouliot saw his minutes dwindle in the final games of the season before opening the playoffs as a fourth-liner. He didn’t do much in the three games he played in the first round against the Bruins — zero shots on goal and less than eight minutes a night — and the only notable thing he did was run Johnny Boychuk in the corner in Game 3, resulting in Andrew Ference, to quote Jack Edwards, attempting to “rip his head off.”

And that, to put it plainly, is where things ended for Benoit Pouliot and the Montreal Canadiens.

“After that hit, when I fought Andrew there, I knew,” Pouliot said in a chat with WEEI.com Tuesday. “Well, I didn’t know, but I didn’t play the rest of the game, and then after that he just didn’t put me back in. We were losing, 2-0, and I was trying to mix something up, but I guess he didn’t like it and I went and sat on the bench.”

The “he” to whom Pouliot referring is former Habs coach Jacques Martin. Pouliot has often spoken about the lack of confidence he felt Martin had in him, but the winger feels he’s in the right situation now.

“All year long, I didn’t have [many] breaks,” Pouliot said of his final season with the Habs. “I felt like they didn’t have confidence in me and didn’t put me in situations that I was good at. It was just kind of all negative stuff, and it kind of sucked actually.

“But now, this year the coach gave me some chances and I tried not to mess it up too much. If I did, well, I didn’t do it twice. You have some bad months, you have some good ones, but I think this year all things were good.”

Pouliot still seems to have a bad taste in his mouth when it comes to Montreal. He was traded to the Habs in the 2009-10 season, and though he had 15 goals in 39 games with Montreal, he never felt the fit was quite right. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs, Benoit Pouliot, Montreal Canadiens,
Brad Marchand: Sensational and significant 12.20.11 at 10:32 am ET
By   |  Comments Off


brightcove.createExperiences();

There are highlight reel goals. And, there are game-winning goals.

On rare occasions, you get both in one. Monday night, Brad Marchand gave Bruins fans a 2-for-1 holiday special with his deke-to-backhander that beat Montreal’s Carey Price with just over five minutes remaining to put the Bruins up, 3-1. It turned out to be the difference when Erik Cole scored with 1:14 left as the Bruins hung on for a 3-2 win.

“Once I got my head up, he was already in the motion of poke checking, and I just pulled it around him, and luckily it went in,” Marchand said.

Marchand was quick to thank linemate Tyler Seguin for his vision to see Marchand breaking down the slot for the goal.

“Well, once Segs got it, I saw [the defenseman] decided to go to him, and I was all alone, so I was hoping he’d get it through and he made the play to get it done,” Marchand said.

All of this for a team know for scoring “dirty work” goals, fighting along the boards and finding a way to finish. On this night, the finish by Marchand was spectacular.

“I think sometimes people underestimate our team for the amount of skill we have, but, you know, we have a lot of guys who make great plays, and every now and then we get a nice goal,” Marchand said. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Florida Panthers, Montreal Canadiens
Bruins exact revenge on Canadiens, record ninth-straight win 11.21.11 at 10:28 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off

Throughout much of the Bruins’ current nine-game win streak, Boston grabbed victories by blowing out opponents. On Monday night, the Bruins proved they could win the close, low-scoring games as well when they shut out the Canadiens, 1-0, in Montreal.

The win moved the Bruins into second place behind the Penguins in the Eastern Conference and into first in the Northeast Division after residing in the basement of both the conference and division just 16 days ago. The last Bruins loss came at the hands of the Canadiens on Oct. 29 at the Bell Centre.

Tim Thomas made 32 saves to earn his second consecutive shutout, both of which came on the road. Defenseman Andrew Ference scored the only goal of the game on a wrister 15:41 into the first period. Rich Peverley and Chris Kelly recorded assists on the tally.

The Bruins will attempt to carry their win streak into double digits when they return to the ice on Wednesday in Buffalo.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

- Ference ended Carey Price‘€™s six-period shutout streak 15:41 into the game with a goal on a cross-ice feed from Rich Peverley that Ference roofed over Price’€™s glove. The goal was Ference’€™s second in as many games. It came on a delayed penalty against Montreal, but the extra-attacker had yet to reach the zone.

- Thomas was outstanding in net on Monday night. He saw the puck extremely well and was in perfect position all night. Thomas made quite a few spectacular saves, including one at the end of the second period when he robbed Mike Camalleri on a power-play jam attempt. He proved how well he was tracking the puck when he snagged a Scott Gomez tip of a Camalleri shot that changed direction at the last moment.

- The Bruins penalty kill had to step up in big moments on Monday. They were tasked with stopping the Canadiens on a four-minute kill that bridged the second and third periods, and then, with Price getting pulled in the waning moments of the game, had to kill off a 6-on-4 for the final 1:39 of the game. The saying goes that a good penalty kill starts with strong goaltending, and although Thomas was strong in net, the Bruins defenders did an admirable job clearing out pucks and pinning plays against the boards. At the end of the second period, Daniel Paille proved the Bruins commitment to the penalty kill when he dove to clear out a puck despite being fresh off surgery for a broken nose.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

- Former Canadien Benoit Pouliot put the Bruins’€™ lead in peril with six penalty minutes off of stick penalties in the second period. Pouliot’€™s second penalty, a four-minute double minor for high sticking, came less than three minutes after the end of his first. Bruins coach Claude Julien made Pouliot pay in the third by benching him for all but 13 seconds of the period.

- The Bruins were unable to sustain much offensive pressure throughout the game, and the top two lines were quiet for most of the night. Brad Marchand and David Krejci failed to put any shots on net. The Bruins in all barely tested Price, putting up 18 shots on the night. They were outshot 14-5 in the third period.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Montreal Canadiens, Tim Thomas,
Patrice Bergeron: It’s not all on the officials 05.26.11 at 1:07 am ET
By   |  1 Comment

p


brightcove.createExperiences();

TAMPA — Despite the suggestion by Claude Julien that the officials may have been influenced by Lightning coach Guy Boucher, center Patrice Bergeron said the Bruins need to take some responsibility for surrendering three power play goals.

“We have to stay disciplined against a team like them,” Bergeron said. “Tonight, they did a good job on their power play but still, we could’ve been better on the power play.

“Obviously, there were a couple after the whistle and a couple during the play. There were a couple of interference [calls] and we were just trying to make some room for our teammate but they were selling it good. At the same time, we have to make sure to stay out of the penalty box and stay disciplined. That’s a key against them.”

The Bruins had killed off 11 straight Tampa Bay power play chances before allowing three straight in second and third periods. The Bruins went 1-for-5 on the power play, including their first man advantage goal on the road in 26 tries.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Montreal Canadiens, NHL
David Krejci: This is why ‘you work all season for home ice’ at 12:23 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

TAMPA — After becoming the first Bruins player since Cam Neely to record a playoff hat trick, David Krejci said the disappointed Bruins can still take solace in the fact they have one game on home ice to win to get to the Stanley Cup finals.

“It’s tough, frustrating obviously, but that’s why you work all season to get home ice advantage, and now we have it,” Krejci said. “Game 7 in our building and in front of our fans, it’s going to be exciting.”

Krejci almost brought the Bruins back single-handedly from a 5-3 deficit late as he scored his third goal with 6:32 remaining in the third. His third goal not only matched Martin St. Louis with his NHL-leading 10th playoff goal, it gave him the first Boston playoff hat trick since Neely against the Canadiens on April 25, 1991. Krejci had several chances in the closing moments as the Bruins swarmed Dwayne Roloson but could not find the equalizer.

“It’s going to be a tough night, maybe, but once you wake up [Thursday], we have to forget about it,” Krejci said. “I think we’ve done a pretty good job at it after a win or loss. We regroup no matter what. We came back strong the next game so hopefully, we can do it again.

“We’re still one win away the Stanley Cup finals so, regroup [Thursday] and get ready for Friday,” Krejci said.

While scoring their first road power play goal in 26 chances, the Bruins were victimized by Lightning power play goals on their first three chances.

“Maybe a couple of calls were questionable but it doesn’t really matter right now,” Krejci said. “What’s done is done. We have to look at their power play, make some adjustments and be better next game.”

The Bruins will be trying to repeat the result of Game 7 in the first round against the Canadiens, when they beat Montreal, 3-2, in overtime on home ice to advance to the second round.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Cam Neely, David Krejci
Nathan Horton doubles his pleasure while doubling the fun for the Bruins 04.28.11 at 12:40 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

p


brightcove.createExperiences();

Nathan Horton isn’t about to complain about being dragged to the postgame press conference room in full uniform like he was Wednesday night to talk about his series-winning goal. After all, he’s getting to be a real pro at taking the stage to discuss such heroics.

Four nights after winning Game 5 in double-overtime, Horton won the game and the series with a bomb of a shot that Carey Price never saw with 14:17 left in overtime to capture Game 7 for the Bruins and avoid the worst kind of heartbreak for Bruins fans.

It also sent the B’s onto a second-round rematch with the Flyers starting this weekend in Philadelphia.

“Yeah, it was pretty nice,” said a smiling Horton. “I mean, it felt pretty good. I don’€™t remember too much. I remember Looch [Milan Lucic] coming up with the puck and I just tried to get open, and I tried putting the puck towards the net. Luckily it got deflected off someone and it went straight in. That’€™s all I remember. It was pretty special, again, it doesn’€™t get any better.”

The goal also saved the Bruins from the devastating heartbreak of blowing a 3-2 lead with less than two minutes left in regulation, when P.K. Subban scored on the power play to force overtime.

“When you have the lead it feels good, but when you give it up, it’€™s tough, especially in Game 7, late in the third, and we battled,” Horton said. “We battled all year, when times have been tough, and we’€™ve come together and it seems like we get stronger and we just start pressing, and that’€™s the way it’€™s been all year. On if it’€™s safe to say he’€™s enjoying the playoffs’€¦ I’€™m really enjoying it. Every day is exciting. Every day is a new day, but it feels good, definitely, to get used to this, continue winning. That’€™s what it’€™s all about.”

Horton was the Bruins player who started off like a house on fire this season, with eight goals in his first 15 games. Then he cooled off before finishing with 26 on the season, just four behind Milan Lucic for the team lead. Safe to say he’s caught fire again at the very best time. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Montreal Canadiens, Nathan Horton
Powerless: B’s aren’t about to complain about officiating on the eve of Game 7 04.27.11 at 12:15 am ET
By   |  1 Comment

After getting what many observers clearly felt was the raw end of the deal from the men in striped shirts Tuesday night, the Bruins still were not about to take a page out of the book of Mike Gillis.

He is the Vancouver Canucks general manager who lambasted the NHL and its officiating crew on Monday, just about 24 hours before its Game 7 Tuesday against the defending Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks Tuesday night.

Yes, the Bruins were put on not one but TWO 5-on-3 disadvantages and the Canadiens scored both times in a 2-1 win to force Game 7 less than 24 hours later in Boston. Yes, the major penalty to Milan Lucic for boarding seemed harsh, even if Jaroslav Spacek was bleeding from the head. And yes, the Bruins can’t really complain about the power play since they yet to convert a single one of 19 chances in the series.

But these Bruins know they still have Game 7 ahead. They figure that eventually the breaks have to even out – with the whistles and on the scoresheet, right?

But still it was a crushing blow to lose your top scorer with more than half the game remaining in a 1-1 contest in Game 6. But that’s what happened when Lucic was shown the gate when Spacek showed the officials blood from the hit just under five minutes into the second period – and just moments after the Bruins had tied it.

“Well, I’€™m not going to comment on it, and simply not for not getting any information, but I haven’€™t had any chance to really look at it closely,” Julien said cleverly. “And you see quick replays here and there but it’€™s something that I need to see here before I’€™m able to comment on that.”

“I can’t comment because I heard it but haven’t seen a replay at all,” added Mark Recchi. “Strange game and a lot of strange things happened out there but it’s part of it. I think 5-on-5 we were a very good hockey team tonight and we have to take that positive and go home and have our home crowd. We’ve been in this before. We have to stay focused, stay relaxed, stay positive and go from there.

“I’m not going to focus too much on what happened. It’s over now. We have to worry about [Wednesday] and can’t dwell on it and have to embrace what’s coming up [in Game 7].”

Added Patrice Bergeron, “I didn’t get a good look at it so I can’t comment on it but obviously, losing Looch, he means a lot.”

Then there was this from Tim Thomas that summed up the Bruins’ frustration.

“It was no harder than any other game,” Thomas said with a wry smile. “Obviously, when it’s 5-on-3, it’s harder to keep the puck out of the net. I’m not a forward. I don’t make or take those type of hits. I’ve already heard from some of the guys on their take on it but I don’t have one. I’m just a goalie.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Milan Lucic
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule
Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines