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Was hit on Adam McQuaid dirty? ‘Reckless’ is more like it 03.30.12 at 12:07 am ET
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At first glance, the Jason Chimera hit on Adam McQuaid with six minutes left in the first period Thursday evokes emotions of anger and revenge.

But even the Bruins, who have been on both sides of vicious hits over the last several seasons, were careful to choose their words carefully after the game, given the fine line between finishing your check and hitting from behind and endangering a vulnerable player.

Chimera was given a five-minute major for charging and a game misconduct for the hit that left McQuaid on the ice for several minutes with a gash over his eye and a dazed head.

The Bruins reaction? Measured.

“Well, you know, again, when it happens to you, you also have to be honest about it. I think, again, he came off the bench, and he was going hard, and maybe it was a little bit reckless, but there’€™s no doubt in my mind that it wasn’€™t intentional,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “You know, McQuaid, Mac just turned at the last second and, you know, put himself in a bit of vulnerable position, but still, like, I agree with the referee’€™s call.

“It was a bit of a reckless hit, and it deserved probably a five[-minute penalty] when you look back at the replay, and they had to make that decision. It was a tough one, but certainly wasn’€™t intent to injure by the player, in my mind. And, you know, and that’€™s why I keep saying, and you’€™ve heard me before, I really, really encourage our players to be careful, with the speed of the game today, to make sure you don’€™t turn your back to the play as much because those kind of things happen. And you worry about the security of the players, you worry about the safety of the game, and I’€™m one of those guys that will look at both sides of it and not just preach for my side of it.”

Joe Corvo – already filling in for injured Dennis Seidenberg – not only saw the hit, but saw both sides. 

“It’€™s nearly impossible when a guy comes, I noticed I think he came off the bench, and really didn’€™t break stride,” Corvo said. “It’€™s a tough play because it’€™s hard for that forward to stop when he’€™s coming that fast and Quaider [McQuaid] kind of turned a little bit. The guy could have let up a little bit but it just happens fast. I think that’€™s why he was so upset that he got thrown out. I don’€™t think he’€™s a dirty player, I think just with his speed it was hard for him to stop.”

Read More: Adam McQuaid, Boston Bruins, Dennis Seidenberg, Jason Chimera
Brian Rolston is finally over ‘whatever happened in Long Island’ 03.28.12 at 12:33 pm ET
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February 27 was a day of liberation for Brian Rolston.

He was traded from the hapless New York Islanders with no chance of making the playoffs back to the Bruins, who are still among the favorites to reach another Stanley Cup final.

Rolston has certainly been inspired.

In his current seven-game scoring streak, he has three goals and nine assists, already matching his productivity in 49 games with the Islanders this season. The Bruins have won three in a row for the first time in over 40 games.

“Just been given a great opportunity, the coaches have shown a lot of confidence in me in certain situations that gives me confidence as a player, and obviously playing with two great players helps out a lot as well,” Rolston said after Tuesday’s 5-2 triumph over Tampa Bay. “I think we just have good chemistry together, that’€™s about it. I’€™ve produced over my career and you know whatever happened in Long Island happened in Long Island and it’€™s past that now.”

What happened on Long Island was four goals and five assists in 49 games for the team that has served as the perennial doormat of the Eastern Conference for the last decade.

Rolston has tasted success from the Stanley Cup before, winning it all with the 1995 New Jersey Devils. He sees these Bruins picking up momentum at just the right time.

“Well, you know obviously we had two real tough games on the road that we won, those were huge games for us,” Rolston said. “Just to get confidence, when you win you get confidence. This team is so good structurally that it’€™s just a matter of time before you do put it together, but this is a good time to put it together for sure and it’€™s a good team in here, great team.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brian Rolston, New York Islanders, NHL
Johnny Boychuk helps Bruins find their jam 03.09.12 at 9:53 am ET
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In the midst of a 1-1 game in the third period, the Sabres and Bruins appeared for all the world to be heading for overtime.

Then with just under 10 minutes remaining in the third – BANG – Johnny Boychuk delivers.

No, it wasn’t his go-ahead blast from the right point with seven minutes remaining. It was something just as electric and woke everyone up in the building. Boychuk cleanly leveled Sabres star Thomas Vanek at Buffalo’s blue line and the tempo had been set for the rest of the game.

“I saw a guy coming back so I could pinch down and I could see [Vanek] wasn’€™t really paying attention too much ‘€“ I just wanted to make sure it was a clean hit,” Boychuk said. “The fans gave us a little boost and we took it from there.”

Shawn Thornton knows a thing or two about physical play and loved what he saw from the hit. To Thornton, the Bruins were playing a solid game and Boychuk’s hit just raised the level.

“Yeah, he’€™s a very physical player,” Thornton said. “I thought we played a pretty good game so I thought the momentum might have been amped up a little bit more. I thought we were pretty solid most of the night as it was.”

There’s an expression in hockey for what the Bruins had Thursday night – jam. It’s the energy to make things happen on the ice.

Two minutes after Boychuk’s wake-up call – just about 15 feet in closer from where he delivered his hit on Vanek – he unloaded one of his characteristic “Johnny Rockets” past Jhonas Enroth and the Bruins had the lead for good in a 3-1 win over the Sabres at TD Garden.

“It was just like a scramble play and I saw the puck coming through and I just decided I’€™ll go down and try to rip it home,” Boychuk said. “It’€™s just, you see the play developing and I know [Patrice Bergeron] is good defensively, so if I go down and get that puck I know he’€™s going to be backing me up.”

Boychuk was asked if he were actually aiming the puck to an open spot above Enroth’s shoulder, the mere suggestion of which made Boychuk laugh.

“Well, I was aiming of course,” Boychuk laughed. “I hit him in the belly a couple of times and one went through him so you know, try to just put it on top.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Buffalo Sabres, Jhonas Enroth, Johnny Boychuk
David Krejci: ‘You just can’t turn it on when the playoffs come’ 03.02.12 at 8:46 am ET
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David Krejci knew full well what his February was like. Like his whole season to this point, it had been very up and down and inconsistent.

That all changed Thursday when the calendar flipped to March. The center-turned-winger was back at center and he netted his second career hat trick, finishing it off with an overtime goal that propelled the Bruins past the Devils, 4-3, in overtime.

Krejci had been in a huge slump coming in, just 13 goals, including two in 13 games in the month of February. His assist totals are also way off. He hasn’t had a helper since Jan. 31 and has 28 for the season, one reason why Julien moved him from center to wing.

But Thursday night with Tyler Seguin on his wing, Krejci was back at center. He looked reenergized and fresh, and most importantly, ready to contribute in a big way down the stretch as the Bruins try to regain their momentum for another spring title run.

“Yeah, I wasn’€™t thinking about it, I had two goals in the month of February,” Krejci said of his struggles in February. “But, you know, I just take it game by game. I want to do my best every game and I was feeling really good before the game and I got Segs on my line so I was excited about it. We click well together with Looch [Milan Lucic] and him and it was a good game for us. I know we had a little sloppy second period but we came back hard in the third and won the game. That was the most important thing.”

His coach has noticed an improvement of late.

“I think he’€™s really, he looks more comfortable right now,” Claude Julien said of Krejci. “As I’€™ve often said, he puts a lot of pressure on himself. He’€™s probably his worst enemy when things aren’€™t going well, and because of that, it doesn’€™t help him in the long run. You try and take some of that pressure off and say, ‘€˜Listen, you’€™ve just got to go out there and play.’€™ So, when he feels good about his game, you see a big difference, and that’€™s what we’€™ve seen here.”

Like his previous two goals, his overtime goal came as the result of finding space in front of Martin Brodeur. And like his first two goals of the night his timing and positioning in front paid off.

“A little lucky that one, I guess. I was at the end of my shift, I was tired and, you know, Bergy [Patrice Bergeron] made a good play,” he said. “I kind of sensed it that he was going to throw it in front of the net and Z [Zdeno Chara] tried to jam it and I was just at the right time at the right place. I saw Brodeur was down so first thought was go upstairs and it worked that time.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, David Krejci, Milan Lucic, New Jersey Devils
Brad Marchand: Sensational and significant 12.20.11 at 10:32 am ET
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There are highlight reel goals. And, there are game-winning goals.

On rare occasions, you get both in one. Monday night, Brad Marchand gave Bruins fans a 2-for-1 holiday special with his deke-to-backhander that beat Montreal’s Carey Price with just over five minutes remaining to put the Bruins up, 3-1. It turned out to be the difference when Erik Cole scored with 1:14 left as the Bruins hung on for a 3-2 win.

“Once I got my head up, he was already in the motion of poke checking, and I just pulled it around him, and luckily it went in,” Marchand said.

Marchand was quick to thank linemate Tyler Seguin for his vision to see Marchand breaking down the slot for the goal.

“Well, once Segs got it, I saw [the defenseman] decided to go to him, and I was all alone, so I was hoping he’d get it through and he made the play to get it done,” Marchand said.

All of this for a team know for scoring “dirty work” goals, fighting along the boards and finding a way to finish. On this night, the finish by Marchand was spectacular.

“I think sometimes people underestimate our team for the amount of skill we have, but, you know, we have a lot of guys who make great plays, and every now and then we get a nice goal,” Marchand said. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Florida Panthers, Montreal Canadiens
Peter Chiarelli: ‘If I could find another Milan Lucic, I’d be very pleased’ 12.19.11 at 8:49 pm ET
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Bruins fans can rest easy.

The team’s general manager made it clear Monday night he’s not about to change the way he builds his roster based on a one-game suspension of one of his higher profile players.

Peter Chiarelli said Monday he understands what Brendan Shanahan was doing by handing out a one-game suspension for Milan Lucic for the hit-from-behind on Zac Rinaldo on Saturday in Philadelphia. There’s a history there with Lucic and the Bruins have skated from possible suspensions on transgressions from Brad Marchand and Adam McQuaid in the last two weeks.

But not this time.

Still, Chiarelli wants to be clear. The Bruins will still be big and bad.

“It’€™s one game, for one thing, so I’€™m not going to react to that,” Chiarelli said minutes before the game Lucic missed with the Canadiens. “We went into the year with the new rule changes thinking that we were going to be a little more heavily scrutinized. We might have even played a heavier game in the playoffs, and, again, people were clamoring that we got away with stuff, and maybe we did, maybe we didn’€™t. But that’€™s the way we built the team, and I’€™m going to continue to build it that way.

“I mean, hey, if I could find another Milan Lucic, I’€™d be very pleased. I think everyone in the league would want a player like that. No, we won’€™t stray from how we built it, and we’€™ll continue to put the pieces in that have some character and have some toughness.

Chiarelli said he spoke with the top judge in the NHL operations office on Monday, getting the full explanation of the discipline.

“I talked to Brendan Shanahan today following his sanction on Milan, the one-game suspension, and what was explained to me was that when there have been incidents before with a player, they look at the whole body of work,” Chiarelli said. “I don’€™t know if it’€™s as strong as being a repeat offender, but he’€™s done stuff in the past, according to hockey ops, that go to his character reference when they’€™re looking at putting up punishment. Brendan didn’€™t say this, but if it was his first incident, I would think maybe he wouldn’€™t have been suspended. Brendan didn’€™t say that, but that’€™s my take on the whole thing.

“If you go back and see what Milan has done, to me, it’€™s pretty unremarkable, but they obviously look at everything.”

But Chiarelli, to his credit, did itemize the list of misdeeds that led up to Monday’s suspension.

“I think he got a suspension against [Maxim] Lapierre, he got the fine against Freddy Meyer, he got a warning on [Ryan] Miller, and this,” Chiarelli said. “I might have been missing one, but he didn’€™t get any other warnings. You wouldn’€™t know of warnings because, short of a fine, they don’€™t publicize that. I agree with the global objective of addressing player safety, and if the body of work means that now he’€™s in that, again, not ‘€œrepeat offender,’€ but the ‘€œrepeat concerns,’€ I guess, however you want to characterize it, then if that’€™s what it is, that’€™s what it is. Obviously I support the league’€™s attempt at addressing player safety.

“And I think Milan might have explained to you, and he actually, if you look at it closely, I feel that he has, he did change his game, so to speak, on that check. I thought he stopped skating. If you looked at his left arm going in, I thought he tried to lever him so that he could hit him in the crest, and I don’€™t think he hit him as hard as he normally does. Milan’€™s a guy who’€™s led our team in hits, I think, since he’€™s been here, and he’€™s very rarely been penalized with boarding, hit from behind ‘€“ the roughing stuff. He’€™s a clean player, and that’€™s what the law is now, so we’€™ll abide by it.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brendan Shanahan, Milan Lucic, NHL
Tuukka Rask: ‘Just try to save every puck’ 12.14.11 at 9:58 am ET
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There were several chances for Tuukka Rask to blink in the third period Tuesday and lose his first shutout of the season.

But the Bruins goalie, on the heels of replacing Tim Thomas on Saturday in Columbus, didn’t flinch. He turned away all 20 shots in the third period, and all 41 for the game as the Bruins beat the Kings, 3-0.

“I just tried to save every puck,” Rask said of his ninth career shutout. “You don’€™t want to think about shutouts because you might chase yourself but ‘€“ couple tough chances in the end but that was it.

“You just try to protect your lead and we hopefully get that third goal. They came out hard so got some pretty good chances but were able to keep them off the scoreboard and then Marchy [Brad Marchand] got a nice goal there to extend the lead so that was good to see.”

Kings wing Dustin Brown had a golden opportunity with just about three minutes remaining when Johnny Boychuk lost contain on his man.

“[Brown] pretty much didn’€™t have anything else and just tried to shoot it upstairs, don’€™t know if he actually shot it low or something but it was some kind of misplay there and Johnny was just taking back door and he left the guy there for me and ‘€“ hit something,” Rask said.

Rask said he wasn’t looking at the shots accumulating on the scoreboard during the final 20 minutes.

“I don’€™t think you have time to watch the shot clock or anything but you definitely feel the momentum changing at times and today they had a lot of chances in the third,” he said. “And maybe we weren’€™t at our sharpest but they came at us pretty hard too.

So, on a night the Bruins didn’t have captain Zdeno Chara for the first time this season, the Bruins needed Rask to be the true last line of defense.

“Probably some part of that is Z missing but I think we also need to tighten up,” Rask said. “We weren’€™t that bad we didn’€™t give too many second chances and lots of shots came from the outside and stuff. But it’€™s just one of those games where you get lots of shots against and I don’€™t think it’€™s because of [Chara] missing.

“You need some luck to have some shutouts too. They had a couple of posts today. And I think it’€™s definitely tougher to have a shutout than to play one period.”

Now, Claude Julien has a decision to make. Will he ride the hot hand tonight in Ottawa with Rask or will he go back to his No. 1 in Tim Thomas? No matter the answer, Rask showed Tuesday that the Bruins now have two dependable netminders as they hit the road to take on the Senators and Flyers this week.

“He was good tonight, arguably our best player tonight,” Julien said. “He stood tall and they threw a lot of shots at him, certainly not easy shots to stop. There was a lot of traffic in front of the net’€”screens. He had the quick feet going, made the saves on close-range and was probably our best player. So he got better as the game went on and I thought he did a good job the other night coming in and kind of settling himself in in the third period and then he just carried that into tonight.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Dustin Brown, Los Angeles Kings
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