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Chris Kelly impatiently awaiting his return to Bruins lineup 12.30.13 at 7:48 pm ET
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Chris Kelly took the ice Monday night, but unfortunately for the injured Bruins forward, he wasn’t skating.

Instead he was standing on the ice at Fenway Park as some of his Bruins teammates took part in an open skate as part of Frozen Fenway. Rather than skates, Kelly was wearing the walking boot he’s had to wear since suffering a broken right fibula on a slash from Penguins forward Pascal Dupuis on Dec. 7.

Kelly says he hopes the boot will be off within a matter of days, but as he stands over three weeks from suffering the injury, he admits that his total time before returning to Boston’s lineup will be closer to six weeks, as Claude Julien had told reporters earlier Monday.

The Bruins had initially said that Kelly would miss four to six weeks. Given that he had returned from a broken tibia last season in less than a month, he expected a quicker recovery this time around than he’s had.

“When you’re told a date, you think you can come back quicker,” Kelly told WEEI.com. “[Last season's tibia injury] was one of those that was an injury that you could push, I found. As soon as I was diagnosed [this season], I said, ‘Oh, well I can make it back faster than that.’ Obviously with where the injury is, you can’t push it like the other one. This one might take time, and you need to be patient, but I’m not very patient.”

The good news is that Kelly has been exercising since suffering the injury. He was on the bike the next day, and though he knows there will be some adjustment back to the ice once the boot comes off, he’s at least been keeping in shape.

“I do everything,” Kelly said. “I started riding the bike regularly. We do the aerodyn bike, where I use my arms and my one good leg. And I do upper-body and legs as well.”

Dupuis slashed Kelly in the second period of the injury-laden Dec. 7 meeting between the B’s and Penguins. Kelly played the third period, thinking that the injury wasn’t serious.

“Not that bad,” Kelly said of what he thought at the time. “It hurt and I knew it hurt, but I played the rest of the game and it affected my stride in the third, but I thought maybe [it was] a bone bruise or something. You don’t think it’s broken when you can finish a game.”

Though the Bruins certainly could use Kelly, Ryan Spooner has adjusted to the NHL and has played well of late in his place. Given that this is the second injury to keep Kelly out weeks in his career and that Rich Peverley slid over to handle his duties in his place last season, it’s the first time Kelly has seen a young player step into his spot and perform well in his absence. Kelly says he’s happy to see that his line is in good hands.

“He has played extremely well,” Kelly said. “Spoons skates well and thinks the game well. He’s done a great job. All those young guys that have come in, it’s been great to see. I think when you’re looking at it from a fan’s aspect of how bright the future of this franchise is, you always want your farm system to have players that can step in. Not everyone has that luxury. We’re extremely lucky to have that.”

Read More: Chris Kelly, Pascal Dupuis,
Penguins know they need to play better from behind 06.05.13 at 2:23 pm ET
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The Penguins have one goal this series entering Game 3. (AP)

Two years ago, scoring the goal didn’t necessarily mean anything huge early in the Eastern Conference. The team that scored the first goal between the Bruins and Lightning went 2-3 in the first five games of the season, proving that getting on the board early is important, but it isn’t everything.

That hasn’t been the case this year. In two games, the Bruins have scored the first goal and eventually seen the Penguins go through lifeless stretches as they struggle to play from behind. Pittsburgh had just 13 shots on goal through the first two periods in Game 2, and the chances they got were limited.

So the Penguins enter Game 3 knowing that if they fall behind Wednesday, they can’t pack it in. Remember, this is the same team that came back from a 2-0 deficit against the Bruins with three goals to win in regulation on March 12. They have it within to be a team that plays well from behind, but they just haven’t done it thus far.

“I think the latter half of the games was us deviating from the plan,” Dan Bylsma said of the first two games of the series. “Boston was up at that point in both those hockey games, playing very well and getting to the scoreboard early in contests and then playing well the rest of the way and us, the latter half of both games, looking for offense, pressing the issue and getting away from our game plan.”

Pascal Dupuis said Wednesday that playing from behind against the Bruins is especially difficult because of how much the B’s clog the middle once they’re ahead. That makes the Penguins’ job tougher offensively and forces them to make more chances, which then leads to turnovers. That, partially, can explain just how lopsided the scoring has been (9-1).

Obviously, the Penguins need goals any way they can get them. They’d like the first goal, but if they can’t get it they still need to generate more offense than they have. Sidney Crosby, like Bylsma, feels that the key is to not try anything drastically different once they fall behind.

“We don’t have to chase it,” Crosby said. “I don’t think we need to try to get that one back with one big play, if that’s the case. I think we believe in our game, trust in our game. The regular season would be a good example of that. We’re down 2-0 and it takes a while to finally get that first one, but we just stuck with things. It’s more about the process of the game and playing the right way than maybe the results right away.”

From the Bruins’ perspective, scoring first has meant good things, so they obviously view getting on the board early as a key to potentially taking a 3-0 series lead Wednesday.

“In any game, the first goal is always a good one to get,” Milan Lucic said. “It kinds of builds momentum, builds confidence, but the series is still early. Fortunately we were able to get the first goals in both games, and it’s going to be a big one, whoever gets it tonight.”

Read More: Dan Bylsma, Pascal Dupuis, Sidney Crosby,
Steven Kampfer: Surgery on nose is a possibility 01.20.11 at 12:08 pm ET
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Bruins rookie defenseman Steve Kampfer, sporting stitches on his right nostril, said he will try to play with his broken nose for now. But Kampfer said surgery is a possibility if his breathing is affected. Kampfer left last Saturday’s game with a bloodied and broken nose when Zdeno Chara‘s stick became entangled with Pascal Dupuis and flew up and raked Kampfer across the face.

“They’re going to try and open up the airway, surgery or what it be,” Kampfer said. “Right now, we’re just trying to see if it pops open in the next couple of days with flushing it more but I’m optimistic that I don’t have to go to surgery because that’s the last thing you want to do but at the same time, I can breathe enough to get by. I think that’s the main issue right now is I can breathe, I can play and that’s what I’m going to try to do moving forward.

“I breathe mostly through my mouth when I play, anyway. I keep my mouth open the whole game. It’s not something that’s bothered me the whole time when I’ve played. But at the same time, it would be nice not to wake up with a cotton mouth every morning. It’s one of those things you’ve got to pray it opens up.”

Read More: Pascal Dupuis, Steven Kampfer, Zdeno Chara,
Steve Kampfer suffers broken nose, Marc Savard ‘fine’ after fall into boards 01.15.11 at 4:11 pm ET
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Rookie defenseman Steve Kampfer was sent to the hospital with a broken nose after being bloodied by teammate Zdeno Chara 57 seconds into the second period. Chara became entangled with Pittsburgh’s Pascal Dupuis in the offensive corner when Kampfer came skating by, catching Chara’s stick in the face.

“He went to the hospital and has a broken nose,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “They are just checking him out. We’re going to find out more and the severity of it [Sunday].”

Dupuis was called for the major high-sticking penalty but TV replays clearly showed it was Chara’s stick that did the damage.

“I think it was my stick but not 100 percent sure,” Chara explained after the 3-2 loss to the Penguins. “I was batting and somehow my stick got high, hit Stevie. Just an unfortunate play. But I don’t know exactly how it happened.”

Meanwhile, Marc Savard took a header into the far boards in the third period, after a hit from Pittsburgh’s Deryk Engelland but after spending about a minute on the ice, he got to his knees and skated off on his own power.

“From what I’m told, there was nothing wrong. It was a clean hit,” Julien said. “He was off-balance, got his bell rung a little bit but he’s alright.”

Savard, of course, was hit by Pittsburgh’s Matt Cooke last March 8 on a blindside hit and missed several weeks with a Grade 2 concussion. The two had a couple of run-ins on Saturday but no major brush-ups.

Still, Savard will pay close attention to how he feels over the next 24 hours before getting ready for the Hurricanes on Monday afternoon at TD Garden.

“I’ll monitor it and watch the rest of the day, see how I feel a little bit,” Savard said. “I was a little bit shaken up.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Marc Savard, NHL
Bruins road win streak halted by Penguins 03.07.10 at 5:40 pm ET
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Summary — For the last time ever in the regular season the Bruins travelled to Pittsburgh to play in Mellon Arena against the Penguins and came away  losers by a 2-1 score in a Sunday matinee. Tim Thomas got his third straight start for Boston and took the loss with 27 of saves. The Penguins Marc-Andre Fleury took the decision with 15  stops. The loss snaps the Bruins five-game road winning streak.

The Penguins jumped all over Boston in the third but Thomas stood tall in the losing effort after getting peppered through most of the period. Thomas did give up the game-winner early in the final frame to superstar Evgeni Malkin on a dump shot through a screen down the right wing.

After a scoreless first period the Bruins struck first on the power play when Blake Wheeler was able to sweep a loose puck out from under Fleury at 3:12 in the second. The Penguins came back about five minutes later when Pascal Dupuis put the puck in a scrum in the crease in front of Thomas and banged on it until it trickled passed for the equalizer at 8:57.

Bruins’ center Marc Savard took a hit and elbow to the head late in the third period by Penguins’ forward Matt Cooke. He was carted off the ice on a stretcher. No word on the type or severity of the injury but a concussion would seem likely. Cooke was not issued a penalty for the hit.

Patrice Bergeron played his first game since the Olympic break after sitting the previous three with a groin injury. Tuukka Rask is still listed as day-to-day with a minor knee injury and did not dress.

Three Stars

Marc-Andre Fleury — The Penguins goaltender picked up his 31st win of the year with steady play and a solid defensive effort in front of him.

Evgeni Malkin — The “other” superstar in Pittsburgh scored the go-ahead goal for his 23rd strike of the year early in the third period.

Blake Wheeler — The sophomore forward scored the first goal of the game for only his second strike in 17 games when he tallied on the power play in the second period. The goal was his 14th of the year.

Turning Point — The start of the third period was where the Penguins turned on the heat. Malkin scored the go-ahead goal early in the period and the Bruins could not slow Pittsburgh down the rest of the game as the Penguins dominated the positional play in the final frame.

Key Play – The Penguins new addition of Alexei Ponikarovsky at Wednesday’s trade deadline paid dividends in the third period. Malkin came down the right wing on the rush and threw a dump shot on Thomas that passed through a moving screen by Ponikarovsky on its way to the back of the net. Pittsburgh turned on the heat after that and pressured the Bruins for the rest of the third on its way to the victory.

Read More: Blake Wheeler, Evgeni Malkin, Marc Savard, Marc-Andre Fleury
Second period summary: Bruins-Penguins at 4:35 pm ET
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With the Penguins handing the Bruins multiple opportunities with penalties, it was just a matter of time before Boston broke through.

Evgeni Malkin won the dubious distinction of being the man who committed the penalty (hooking – 2:15) that helped get the Bruins on the board. David Krejci put the puck in the crease and banged on it to the point that Marc-Andre Fleury fell flat on his stomach though not quite on top of the puck. Blake Wheeler then snuck in and swept the puck out from under the goaltender for his 14th goal of the season that gave Boston a 1-0 lead at 3:12.

The Penguins came back in 5-0n-5 at 8:57 in a similar scenario to Wheeler’s goal. Pascal Dupuis swept around the goal only to be semi-stuffed by Tim Thomas but the forward stayed on the puck and it trickled passed Thomas to tie the game at one apiece.

Michael Ryder took a slashing penalty at 3:43 in the period but Boston was able to kill it off. In the middle of the period the teams played two-minutes of 4-on-4 as Ruslan Fedotenko and Mark Stuart got in a tangle in the crease in front of Thomas that led to matching roughing penalties.

Shots in period (total):

Boston — 8 (11)

Pittsburgh — 11 (21)

Read More: Blake Wheeler, Evgeni Malkin, Marc-Andre Fleury, Michael Ryder
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