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Claude Julien ‘disappointed’ by no-goal ruling, but says he won’t hesitate to use challenge in future 10.10.15 at 11:24 pm ET
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Claude Julien and the Bruins got their first taste of the NHL‘€™s new coach’€™s challenge Saturday night, and they came away from the experience more confused than anything.

The play and review seemed pretty straightforward. The refs waved off a Loui Eriksson goal because Patrice Bergeron made contact with Carey Price. However, Bergeron was clearly pushed into Price by Alexei Emelin, meaning the goal should have been allowed.

It was understandable that the refs missed it in real time; hockey is a fast game and sometimes you just don’€™t catch that push. But once Julien decided to use his challenge, it seemed like a pretty safe bet that the no-goal call would be overturned.

Instead, the refs upheld the call on the ice. Why they upheld it remains a mystery, with the league’€™s official statement saying simply that the review “confirmed that Boston’€™s Patrice Bergeron made incidental contact with Montreal goaltender Carey Price before the puck crossed the goal line, preventing Price from doing his job in the crease.”€ No mention of Emelin’€™s shove. No mention of the fact that Bergeron actually made an effort to stay out of the crease while getting pushed.

Julien said he was “disappointed” with the call and didn’€™t understand why it wasn’€™t a goal.

“I really felt, and I looked at it in between periods, and I said how can that not be a goal when the guy has both feet outside the blue paint and is doing everything he can to stay out of his way and is really trying to fight off the guy trying to push him in,” Julien said. “So, I thought that warranted obviously a goal, but for some reason they saw it some other way.”

Goalie interference plays are one of two things coaches can challenge (with goals scored on a potential offsides being the other), and Julien said it’€™s his understanding that whether or not a player was pushed into the goalie is part of what can be reviewed, which would rule out the possibility that the refs could only look at Bergeron’€™s contact with Price and not how he got there.

Bergeron couldn’€™t make sense of the ruling either, as he also thought that being pushed into Price should’€™ve negated the interference.

“That was my understanding of the rule,” Bergeron said. “They thought otherwise and we can’€™t really control that, I guess. … It happens fast, so I guess I understood that maybe he thought that I pushed into the goalie. But then on the replay, I thought it was clear that I got pushed into him. My understanding was that if I get pushed into the goalie and I’€™m working hard to get out of there, it’€™s fine.”

Julien said that despite the fact that this challenge didn’€™t go the way he expected, he wouldn’€™t hesitate to challenge a similar situation in the future.

“€œThat’€™s a thing you’€™ve got to be careful of — you can’€™t [be discouraged],”€ Julien said. “In our minds, the people that looked at it in the first place all felt it should have been a goal, and I went back to my office in between periods and I felt it should have been a goal. But if you’€™re afraid to call those then you may miss an opportunity to either get a goal called for you or the other way around, a goal rescinded from what you think was interference.”

The disallowed goal certainly isn’€™t the reason the Bruins lost Saturday. More turnovers, more defensive mistakes and an inability to get the puck out of their own zone had a lot more to do with Saturday night’€™s 4-2 loss than that one call. But there’€™s no denying that it was a turning point of sorts, especially since the Canadiens scored just over a minute later to make it 3-0.

Read More: Claude Julien, Loui Eriksson, Patrice Bergeron,
Tuukka Rask: Bruins ‘had a chance to score way more goals’ in season-opening loss 10.09.15 at 12:48 am ET
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Maybe it’s appropriate that the best comments on the Bruins’ lack of offensive finish in a 6-2 season-opening loss Thursday night came from their goalie.

On a night when the Bruins outchanced the visiting Winnipeg Jets badly in the first period, Tuukka Rask had to make several saves close in to preserve a 1-0 lead heading into the first period. There were chances from Ryan Spooner, Brett Connolly and Brad Marchand, all in close and around Jets goalie Ondrej Pavelec minutes after the Bruins were staked to a lead on a pretty goal from David Krejci.

“I mean I think most importantly, we want to take that offense,” Tuukka Rask said of what he saw from his vantage point 180 feet away. “We created a ton of chances, and had a chance to score way more goals than we did, so I think that’€™s the most important thing to take from this game.”

As the Bruins continued to misfire in close in the opening five minutes of the second period, there was the overwhelming sense that the visitors were dictating the pace, using Boston’s desperation against them. That was reinforced once the Jets tied the game and took the lead minutes later in the second.

“When we start cheating offensively a little bit, then one mistake leads to another very quickly, and we did that today a couple times,” Rask said. “It’€™s a process in the making, and we just have to correct some things out, but it’€™ll be good.”

Patrice Bergeron was another player who had his chances from close range but could not finish to beat Pavelec.

“It definitely would have been nice to come out of that [first] period with more than one goal,” Bergeron said. “That definitely wouldn’€™t have hurt us. Looking back in the second, we had a few breakdowns that they capitalized, which we didn’€™t. That was the story of the game right there. We definitely lost momentum, yeah – we got to find ways to score when we do have our chances and generate some more momentum with that.”

The Bruins outshot the Jets, 14-6, in the first 20 minutes and headed into the first intermission with a power play, thanks to a cheap shot elbow to the face of Bergeron by Jets defenseman Alexander Burmistrov.

“I think it would’€™ve been nice to come out of there with a better lead than we did after the first with the type of opportunities that we had,” Claude Julien said, echoing the words of Bergeron. “It should’€™ve been a two- or three-goal period. But we misfired or missed those opportunities and allowed them to stay in the game. And then the second period they came out and kind of took over and we started making some defensive mistakes. Whether, I thought, whether it was coverage, layers, or whether their was decisions with the puck or D-zone awareness, we made all of those mistakes tonight which resulted in goals against.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Patrice Bergeron, Tuukka Rask,
Claude Julien hopes Alexander Burmistrov receives supplemental discipline for hit to Patrice Bergeron’s head 10.08.15 at 10:16 pm ET
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Claude Julien wasn’t happy about his team’s performance in Thursday night’s season-opening loss to the Jets, but his criticism extended past his players to one Alexander Burmistrov.

The Jets forward cut back to catch Patrice Bergeron with an elbow to the head late in the first period of Winnipeg‘s 6-2 win over the Bruins. Bergeron, who has had a number of concussions in his career, was irate with Burmistrov following the play, taking a cross-checking penalty in retaliation.

Though Burmistrov was given a minor penalty for an illegal hit to the head, Julien said after the game that the play deserves supplemental discipline.

“It will be interesting how that is being reviewed, and especially to an elite player in the league who’€™s had some [concussion] issues in the past,” Julien said. “I hope they look at it seriously. In my mind, I don’€™t see why there wouldn’€™t be further consequences [for] that.”

Said Bergeron: “It was a hit to the head. Even though he apologized after, it’€™s one of those that I didn’€™t have the puck at that time. You have to realize where the guy is and his position.’€

Read More: Claude Julien, Patrice Bergeron,
Pierre McGuire on OM&F: ‘Really, really critical’ Bruins get off to good start at 1:06 pm ET
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Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

NBC Sports NHL analyst Pierre McGuire made his weekly appearance on Ordway, Merloni and Fauria on Thursday to preview the Bruins’ season. To hear the interview, go to the OM&F audio on demand page.

McGuire said with so many players being added to the team in the offseason, patience is going to be key for coach Claude Julien, as well as getting off to a hot start.

“Well, he’s going to have to be because that’s patience is going to be part of his job to make sure these players learn how to play,” McGuire said. “Dougie Houda, the other assistant coach who works mostly with the defense, he’s going to have to do some pretty patient work with those young players as well on defense. The expectation in Boston is so high, obviously, and it should be. It is a strong franchise and an original six franchise. I love the intensity. The fan base is obviously rapid.

“It’s an important franchise in the league, but it’s really, really critical that they get off to a good start because this is the kind of thing that confidence is going to be a premium. If they get off to a bad start, the confidence starts to wain, it would be a tough year.”

With the team already dealing with a number of injuries to open the year, health is a concern.

“They will have to start getting some people healthy, especially Big Z (Zdeno Chara) No. 1, and No. 2 [Dennis] Seidenberg injury sets them back a little bit,” McGuire said. “They also have Kevan Miller and Colin Miller with Colin Miller coming over in the [Milan] Lucic trade, who can really step up his game. I thought there was some moments in preseason where he was very good. The Bruins clearly know him well from his days in Manchester and his days at [Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds]. They have to hope he can get it going and obviously Torey Krug takes another step forward.

“This is going to be interesting. It is going to be interesting to watch. The one thing I would caution Bruins fans on is I would never bet against a team that has Patrice Bergeron and Zdeno Chara in their leadership core. I never would just because I respect those guys so much.”

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Read More: David Pastrnak, Patrice Bergeron, Pierre McGuire, Zdeno Chara
Patrice Bergeron ready for different training camp than Bruins have had in recent years 09.02.15 at 3:01 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — The voluntary practices that take place prior to training camp in September are very informal. The optional attendance means the group of Bruins that take the ice can be pretty varied from one day to the next. With guys like David Pastrnak, Chris Kelly and Dennis Seidenberg not making it on Wednesday, there weren’€™t as many familiar faces as there were the day before.

Take that approach and apply it to building the actual roster, and you’€™ve got the 2015-16 Bruins.

Turnover was the name of the game this offseason, which means that plenty of time this preseason (and, realistically, the first couple months of the regular season) will be devoted to new guys fitting in and current Bruins getting familiar with new teammates. Where past training camps have largely been focused on the previous year’€™s team shaking off the cobwebs while minimal roster spots were open for competition, this month figures to be quite a bit busier.

“It’€™s going to be different from the past few years,” Patrice Bergeron said after Wednesday’€™s skate at Ristuccia Arena. “I’€™ve been here a little longer, so there’€™s been some years before where it’€™s been a complete change, so it is going to be different from the past few years, but I’€™ve been through that before. I think it’€™s just about getting to know the guys on and off the ice.”

Among the new faces are Matt Beleskey, Jimmy Hayes, Zac Rinaldo, Colin Miller and Matt Irwin. Beleskey is considered the biggest prize, as he was the top free agent wing this offseason after scoring 22 goals for the Ducks last season.

“It’€™s our job as leaders and veteran guys to make guys feel comfortable off the ice and even on and make everyone realize it’€™s about everyone,” Bergeron said. “It’€™s not just one guy or two guys here. It’€™s about everyone going towards the same direction if you want to have some results.”

The players who left are more notable than the ones coming in, as Dougie Hamilton (Flames), Milan Lucic (Kings), Reilly Smith (Panthers) and Carl Soderberg (Avalanche) were all traded. The Hamilton loss is the biggest, but the other departures could hurt the Bruins in the short term while the new guys get settled in. With Smith gone, Bergeron and Brad Marchand seek a new full-time right wing for their line for the second time in three years.

Asked about Hamilton leaving, Bergeron was complimentary of the player’€™s character. After all, when Hamilton made the Bruins in 2013, Claude Julien said his character was more like Bergeron’€™s than that of fellow young star Tyler Seguin.

Yet Hamilton’€™s exit raised many questions, particularly when it became apparent he did not want to sign a new contact with the Bruins. While Hamilton wasn’€™t necessarily the most popular guy among his teammates, there was never any indication that things were so bad that the sides wouldn’€™t want to move forward together.

“I think he’€™s still the same guy,” Bergeron said when reminded of Julien’€™s comparison. “He’€™s low-key and he’€™s trying to get better. I wish him all the best, and I can’€™t really say what happened because I’€™m not sure what happened.’€

Bergeron said didn’€™t see the trade coming.

“I didn’€™t get that sense,” he said when asked if he’€™d ever detected unhappiness on Hamilton’€™s part. “There’€™s been discussions between him, the management, his agent that I’€™m not aware of, so I can’€™t really go any further.”

Veterans still have another couple weeks before training camp kicks off on Sept. 17. The informal practices provide an opportunity for this much-altered squad to jell, and they could likely use it.

Read More: Dougie Hamilton, Patrice Bergeron,
Pierre McGuire on MFB: ‘I do think [the Bruins] have a plan’ 06.29.15 at 12:26 pm ET
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Pierre McGuire

Pierre McGuire

NBC Sports analyst Pierre McGuire joined Middays with MFB on Monday to discuss the Bruins’ rebuilding strategy and the direction they will go after surprise moves prior to the NHL draft last week. To hear the full interview, visit the Middays with MFB audio on demand page.

Amidst highly controversial moves, McGuire does not expect the Bruins to hold a fire sale and rid themselves of other veterans like Zdeno Chara and Tuukka Rask.

“I can’t see that happening,” McGuire said. “They’re a proud franchise. I can’t see that alienation of their fan base. They’ve been down this road before back in the [mid-1990s]. It was painful. … They’ve still got a very solid infrastructure of players. But again, they’re going to have to pass the torch here because some of their better guys are getting older.

“I can’t see them trading Patrice Bergeron. You put his name out there and every team in the league’s going to want him. … This is my one word of caution on this: I would be really careful pre-judging this thing if I were a Bruins fan, because I do think they have a plan. Doesn’t mean they have to share it with everybody only because you don’t want to show your cards too often in this league. In this league, they throw you anchors, not life jackets.”

According to McGuire, the recent moves made by the Bruins are part of a trend that began last offseason with the departure of Shawn Thornton and Jarome Iginla, among others.

“[My reaction was] that Don Sweeney wanted to put his stamp on the team early on along with Cam Neely that this was clearly something that was approved by ownership, that they felt that maybe something had gone a little bit astray in their building plan and they wanted to try to get it straightened out as soon as possible,” McGuire said. “I remember being in Boston last year when Johnny Boychuk got traded away … and I remember the reaction of the players and it was really negative. They were not happy at all.

Shawn Thornton moves on to Florida, Jarome Iginla moves on to Colorado, Johnny Boychuk moves on to the New York Islanders and then you see what happens this year — Chiarelli gets fired, Gregory Campbell‘s not coming back, Danny Paille’s not coming back, Milan Lucic isn’t coming back and obviously Dougie Hamilton’s not coming back. Start doing the math. That’s a huge part of your infrastructure, so clearly they knew that they wanted to go in a younger, different direction and they’ve started that process.”

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Read More: Don Sweeney, Dougie Hamilton, Martin Jones, Milan Lucic
Patrice Bergeron wins third Selke Trophy 06.24.15 at 7:18 pm ET
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Patrice Bergeron won his second consecutive Selke Trophy at Wednesday night’€™s NHL Awards in Las Vegas. The Boston center beat out Chicago’€™s Jonathan Toews and Los Angeles’€™ Anze Kopitar.

Bergeron is now a three-time winner of the Selke, which is given to the best defensive forward in the NHL as voted upon by the Pro Hockey Writers Association. Bergeron first won the award in the 2011-12 season and finished a close second to Toews in 2013 before earning consecutive Selke wins.

Bergeron is just the fifth player to win the Selke three times, joining Bob Gainey, Guy Carbonneau, Jere Lehtinen and Pavel Datstyuk. Only Gainey has won it four times.

The votes came down to the wire in Bergeron’s favor, as Bergeron recieved 1083 voting points to Toews’ 1051. Kopitar was a distant third with 364.

The 29-year-old Bergeron led the NHL with a 60.2 faceoff percentage this past season and was second in the league with an 8.99 percent CorsiRel. He also led the Bruins with 55 points, tying Dougie Hamilton for the team lead with 32 assists and scoring 23 goals.

While Toews’€™ quality of competition was higher than Bergeron’€™s this season, Bergeron had tougher shifts than both Toews and Kopitar based zone starts and boasted better possession numbers.

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