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Patrice Bergeron has maintenance day as Bruins prepare for Islanders 03.11.16 at 12:38 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Patrice Bergeron was the only player absent from Friday’s practice as the Bruins prepared to host the Islanders in the upcoming Saturday matinee.

Bergeron, who committed an ill-timed line change in the Bruins’ 3-2 overtime loss to the Hurricanes on Thursday, was given a maintenance day on Friday, according to Claude Julien.

Kevan Miller, who has missed the Bruins’ last three games since taking a hit from behind from Alexander Ovechkin last Saturday, practiced with the Bruins for the second straight day.

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Eriksson-Bergeron-Pastrnak an intriguing option for Bruins 01.07.16 at 11:29 pm ET
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David Pastrnak

David Pastrnak

It looks like the Bruins are going to use David Pastrnak the right way.

After recalling the 19-year-old scorer from Providence, the Bruins skated Pastrnak on the right wing of Patrice Bergeron‘€™s line in Thursday’€™s practice. Loui Eriksson was at left wing, as Brad Marchand will serve the final game of his three-game suspension Friday night.

The line is extremely intriguing. Playing Pastrnak on Bergeron’€™s line has always seemed to make sense (see: Tyler Seguin‘€™s 29-goal 2011-12 season), but “the Bergeron line” usually means “the Bergeron and Marchand line.” Bergeron and Marchand have pretty much been a package deal since midway through the 2010-11 season, and for good reason. They’€™re among the best duos in the NHL.

Yet having Eriksson at left wing could have an interesting impact on Pastrnak. Both Eriksson and Marchand are scorers — they have 15 and 14 goals, respectively — but Marchand is more of an electric player with the puck on his stick than Eriksson. Bergeron, a very good scorer in his own right with 15 goals, can pretty much just dish to Marchand, count to three and be part of a scoring chance.

Eriksson does a lot of things, but he isn’€™t the skater or offensively ambitious player that Marchand is. With the exception of the 2011-12 season, when Seguin scored 29 goals, Marchand has always scored more goals than his line’€™s right wing.

Having Eriksson on the line could open up the door for the Bergeron line’€™s right wing to be more of a scorer.

“Brad creates a lot by having the puck and by me trying to send him with his speed,” Bergeron said. “I think Loui’€™s more territorial and possession and kind of slowing the play down a little bit more. They’€™re different in their own rights.

“Me being a righty, my tendency is to go to my left side a little bit more, so maybe my righties are not as happy with me, but we’€™re trying to use both sides. Brad’€™s got the puck a little bit more than Loui would. Loui likes to kind of send it and chip it and dump it a little bit more.”€

Speaking after Thursday’€™s practice, Pastrnak seemed thrilled by the idea of playing with Bergeron. After not playing since Oct. 31 due to a foot injury and a lengthy rehab tour that took him to Finland for the World Junior Championships, he was probably just relieved to be back with the B’€™s.

Pastrnak played a little with Bergeron and Marchand last season, but most of his season was spent on David Krejci‘€™s line. When Krejci got hurt, Pastrnak played with Ryan Spooner and Milan Lucic.

Skating with both Eriksson and Bergeron will be a new experience for the young forward, but based on what Bergeron would want in a right wing on a line with Eriksson, Pastrnak sounds like a good fit.

“I think the righty needs to go a little bit more and use his speed more and try to [have] us find him,” Bergeron said.

Brett Connolly, who has spent a lot of time on the right wing of Bergeron’€™s line this season, has had both Marchand and Eriksson as his left wing.

“Obviously Marchy’€™s more gritty, in your face,” Connolly said. “Loui’€™s more [about] using his hockey sense to make some plays. He seems to always be in the right areas. Two good players. Two smart players.”

If Eriksson’€™s presence allows for more facilitating, Pastrnak could be beneficiary for at least a game. One would think Marchand and Bergeron would be reunited once Marchand’€™s suspension is up, but for now Claude Julien has an interesting line at his disposal.

Read More: David Pastrnak, Loui Eriksson, Patrice Bergeron,
Patrice Bergeron named NHL All-Star 01.06.16 at 12:51 pm ET
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WILMINGTON — Patrice Bergeron was named an NHL All-Star on Wednesday. The Bruins’ center will represent the Atlantic Division in the new 3-on-3 tournament format in Nashville.

This is the second consecutive and second overall All-Star nod for Patrice Bergeron. The silly event will take place Jan. 30-31 at Bridgestone Arena.

Bergeron leads the Bruins with 37 points. With 15 goals, he’€™s on pace for a career-high 32 goals. Bergeron has hit the 30-goal mark twice in his career, reaching the plateau in 2005-06 (31 goals) and 2014-15 (30).

Other All-Stars include Boston College product Johnny Gaudreau and former Bruins Jaromir Jagr and Tyler Seguin.

Bergeron is the Bruins’ only representative in the tournament, meaning Zdeno Chara will not be able to participate in the Hardest Shot competition for the second-straight All-Star game. Chara holds the record for hardest recorded shot at 108.8 miles per hour, set in 2012.

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Undermanned Bruins in a strange state after season-worst 5-of-6 skid 01.05.16 at 11:58 pm ET
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Loui Eriksson

Loui Eriksson

In a result that surprised just about no one, the Bruins, sans David Krejci and Brad Marchand, dropped a game to the best team in the Eastern Conference on Tuesday night.

Washington took a 1-0 lead in the first period and never trailed en route to a 3-2 victory at TD Garden.

Now, compared to the B’s poor effort in a 5-1 loss to Montreal on New Year’s Day, Tuesday’s one-goal defeat might even qualify for “moral victory” status to some.

However, when the B’s big picture now paints a season-worst funk, with the team having lost five of its last six games, it was hard to find great optimism in the Boston locker room after Tuesday’s game.

“I don’t know, a little bit up and down,” winger Loui Eriksson said of his team’s effort. “We’re playing a good team and they took advantage of us in the first [period]. We came back a couple of times, but in the end they won a game. It’s a tough one, we need to start winning here again.”

Coach Claude Julien approved of the will, but not quite the way.

“Yes, for me, disappointed in the loss,” Julien said. “Not disappointed in the effort. There’s no moral victory, but I can’t criticize the effort our team gave tonight. In the situation we’re in we almost had to play a perfect game to beat those guys. Our guys worked hard, they had chances, and this is a good [Washington] hockey club.

“We gave ourselves a chance there, I don’t think we ever quit. We were down a goal, then down two and came back into it. They made a big save on [Zdeno Chara] at the end to keep that game from being tied. I think our guys tried, really tried, but at the same time in this league you’ve got to win hockey games. We’ve got to be disappointed, hungrier for the next game so we can turn things around here. Hopefully the bitterness in our mouth from losing tonight is going to carry into Friday in New Jersey.”

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Read More: Claude Julien, Loui Erikkson, Patrice Bergeron, Tuukka Rask
Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara can’t explain Bruins falling so flat 01.01.16 at 6:39 pm ET
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FOXBORO — No excuses.

The Bruins managed just three shots in the opening 20 minutes of the biggest hockey spectacle in New England since the 2013 Stanley Cup finals.

They went a span of 15 minutes in the first period without a single shot.

The Bruins were without the suspended Brad Marchand and the injured David Krejci but still, Bruins players couldn’t come up with a reason for such a flat effort in a 5-1 loss to Montreal in the 2016 Winter Classic.

“We couldn’t generate any rhythm,” Patrice Bergeron said. “We weren’t first on pucks. We were second on every one of them, and you can’€™t get any pucks on net if you don’€™t have the puck, so that was basically the reason why.”

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Read More: 2016 Winter Classic, Boston Bruins, Montreal Canadiens, Patrice Bergeron
5 things we learned as Frank Vatrano’s hat trick leads Bruins past Penguins 12.18.15 at 9:44 pm ET
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Frank Vatrano

Frank Vatrano

Frank Vatrano had gone nine straight games without a goal. He now has three in his last 10 games.

Vatrano busted out of his scoring slump with the first hat trick of his career as the Bruins separated in the third period to enjoy a 6-2 victory at the Penguins at CONSOL Energy Center. The victory saw the Bruins sweep this week’€™s home-and-home series with the Penguins.

Patrice Bergeron also had a multi-goal game, as he netted a shorthanded tally in the second and added an even-strength goal early in the third to extend Boston’€™s lead. The goals brought his season total to 11, putting him behind only Brad Marchand (15) and Loui Eriksson (12) on the Bruins this season. He is also at over a point-per-game pace this season with 32 points in 31 games.

As for Tuukka Rask, the Bruins’€™ top netminder stood tall against a struggling Penguins offense for his eighth win in his last 10 appearances (8-0-2). With 29 saves on Friday, Rask has a .959 save percentage over his last 10 games.

The Bruins would have another goal in the third period, but a goal from Landon Ferraro was not allowed due to what the officials found to be goaltender interference committed by Max Talbot.

Here are four more things we learned Friday night:

UMASS NIGHT

Vatrano wasn’€™t the only UMass product with a couple of points Friday, as his former teammate in Conor Sheary had both a goal and an assist for the first two points of his career.

Sheary’€™s goal came on a bit of bad luck for the Bruins, as Bergeron fanned on a puck behind the net, leading Sidney Crosby to send it in front for Sheary. The Melrose native had the secondary helper on a second-period goal from Trevor Daley.

SHORTHANDED MAGIC

Bergeron took a holding penalty in the first period to put him at 20 penalty minutes on the season, which puts him on pace to set a new career-high for the third straight year. With the Bruins managing to kill off the ensuing Penguins power play without their best penalty-killing forward, Bergeron made up for it the following period.

With Kevan Miller in the box for tripping Sheary early in the second, Brad Marchand won a puck high in the Penguins zone and fed it to his penalty-killing partner. Bergeron rewarded Marchand for his work by flicking the puck past Jeff Zatkoff for the Bruins’€™ sixth shorthanded goal of the season.

While the Bruins’€™ penalty kill was technically a perfect 5-for-5 on the night, a point shot from Daley made its way through traffic and past Rask just seconds after rate expiration of Miller’€™s penalty.

POINTS KEEP COMING FOR SPOONER

After a two-point night for Ryan Spooner Wednesday (two assists; what appeared to be a second-period Spooner goal was credited to Jimmy Hayes, as it apparently hit the shaft of his stick), the young Bruins center doubled that production on Friday with a career-best four-assist night.

Spooner took the puck from the wall after some strong work along the wall from Ferraro, walked it over to the faceoff dot and fed it back to Vatrano, who snapped the puck past Zatkoff to tie the game at one goal apiece. Spooner assisted all three of Vatrano’s goals and Loui Eriksson’s power play goal.

With Spooner’€™s four assist on Friday, he now has 10 points (three goals, seven assists) over his last six games.

Another point wasn’€™t the only thing Spooner dropped on Friday. Following a big hit from Patric Hornqvist on Dennis Seidenberg in the second period, Spooner threw his gloves down and went after the Penguins forward. Hornqvist was not interesting in fighting, resulting in an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty on Spooner. The fight would have been the first of Spooner’€™s professional career and quite possibly of his life, as Spooner did not fight at the OHL level either.

THREE STRAIGHT FOR ERIKSSON

Eriksson was relentless in trying to jam a loose puck past Zatkoff during a second-period Bruins power play, eventually doing so for his 12th goal of the year. The tally also made it three straight games with a goal for Eriksson, who will easily surpass the 22 goals he scored last season as long as he stays healthy.

Eriksson could have had two power play goals on the night, but he couldn’€™t control a slap pass from Krug at the right circle despite having a wide open net.

Read More: Frank Vatrano, Patrice Bergeron, Tuukka Rask,
Claude Julien ‘disappointed’ by no-goal ruling, but says he won’t hesitate to use challenge in future 10.10.15 at 11:24 pm ET
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Claude Julien and the Bruins got their first taste of the NHL‘€™s new coach’€™s challenge Saturday night, and they came away from the experience more confused than anything.

The play and review seemed pretty straightforward. The refs waved off a Loui Eriksson goal because Patrice Bergeron made contact with Carey Price. However, Bergeron was clearly pushed into Price by Alexei Emelin, meaning the goal should have been allowed.

It was understandable that the refs missed it in real time; hockey is a fast game and sometimes you just don’€™t catch that push. But once Julien decided to use his challenge, it seemed like a pretty safe bet that the no-goal call would be overturned.

Instead, the refs upheld the call on the ice. Why they upheld it remains a mystery, with the league’€™s official statement saying simply that the review “confirmed that Boston’€™s Patrice Bergeron made incidental contact with Montreal goaltender Carey Price before the puck crossed the goal line, preventing Price from doing his job in the crease.”€ No mention of Emelin’€™s shove. No mention of the fact that Bergeron actually made an effort to stay out of the crease while getting pushed.

Julien said he was “disappointed” with the call and didn’€™t understand why it wasn’€™t a goal.

“I really felt, and I looked at it in between periods, and I said how can that not be a goal when the guy has both feet outside the blue paint and is doing everything he can to stay out of his way and is really trying to fight off the guy trying to push him in,” Julien said. “So, I thought that warranted obviously a goal, but for some reason they saw it some other way.”

Goalie interference plays are one of two things coaches can challenge (with goals scored on a potential offsides being the other), and Julien said it’€™s his understanding that whether or not a player was pushed into the goalie is part of what can be reviewed, which would rule out the possibility that the refs could only look at Bergeron’€™s contact with Price and not how he got there.

Bergeron couldn’€™t make sense of the ruling either, as he also thought that being pushed into Price should’€™ve negated the interference.

“That was my understanding of the rule,” Bergeron said. “They thought otherwise and we can’€™t really control that, I guess. … It happens fast, so I guess I understood that maybe he thought that I pushed into the goalie. But then on the replay, I thought it was clear that I got pushed into him. My understanding was that if I get pushed into the goalie and I’€™m working hard to get out of there, it’€™s fine.”

Julien said that despite the fact that this challenge didn’€™t go the way he expected, he wouldn’€™t hesitate to challenge a similar situation in the future.

“€œThat’€™s a thing you’€™ve got to be careful of — you can’€™t [be discouraged],”€ Julien said. “In our minds, the people that looked at it in the first place all felt it should have been a goal, and I went back to my office in between periods and I felt it should have been a goal. But if you’€™re afraid to call those then you may miss an opportunity to either get a goal called for you or the other way around, a goal rescinded from what you think was interference.”

The disallowed goal certainly isn’€™t the reason the Bruins lost Saturday. More turnovers, more defensive mistakes and an inability to get the puck out of their own zone had a lot more to do with Saturday night’€™s 4-2 loss than that one call. But there’€™s no denying that it was a turning point of sorts, especially since the Canadiens scored just over a minute later to make it 3-0.

Read More: Claude Julien, Loui Eriksson, Patrice Bergeron,
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