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Bruins Game 5 Live Blog: B’s, Habs head to overtime 04.23.11 at 6:29 pm ET
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Join DJ Bean, Mike Petraglia and others at the TD Garden for Game 5 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals.

<a href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” mce_href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=544866eb6c” >WEEI.com Bruins Game 5 Live Blog</a>

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Canadiens, Carey Price
Bruins drop Game 2 to Canadiens 04.16.11 at 9:47 pm ET
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By DJ Bean and Scott McLaughlin

If the Bruins weren’t feeling the pressure before Game 2 of the Eastern Conference quarterfinals, they should be now. A 3-1 loss to the Canadiens gives the Habs a 2-0 series lead and means the Bruins suddenly have to show they can win at the Bell Centre.

Playing without Zdeno Chara (dehydration), the B’s saw the Habs jump out to a 2-0 lead in the game’s first 2:20. Michael Cammallari put a rebound off a James Wisniewski shot past Tim Thomas 43 seconds into the game, while Mathieu Darche struck on the power play shortly after.

The Bruins did get on the board in the second period with a Patrice Bergeron tally that injected some life into the building, but after two games the B’s have been able to put just one puck past Carey Price through two games.

The Bruins played a more physical game than they did Thursday night, but were reckless at times. After a no-show from the top line in Game 1 and not enough of what Claude Julien wanted in the first two period, Claude Julien broke up the Milan Lucic - David KrejciNathan Horton trio by sending Horton to the third line in favor of Rich Peverley.

The B’s will play Game 3 in Montreal on Monday night. They need to get a win at the Bell Centre (where they went 0-2-1 in the regular season) either Monday or Thursday to bring the series back to Boston for a fifth game.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE BRUINS

– For much of the game, the Bruins’ puck-movement appeared to be that of strangers in a pickup game. They repeatedly made passes that were either off the mark, intended for a player who wasn’€™t looking or easily intercepted by a Canadien. Boston looked particularly shaky in its own end, as the defensemen struggled to retrieve pucks in the corners and start clean breakouts. Montreal’€™s second goal came as the direct result of a bad Andrew Ference pass behind the net.

– Speaking of passes — and hindsight is 20/20 — but maybe the B’s should have passed on the Tomas Kaberle deal. Aside from a shot hitting the post on the power play in the second period, there was nothing encouraging about Kaberle’s night, and that’s been a pretty common occurrence. He had issues keeping the puck in the offensive zone on routine plays, but the icing on the cake came when Krejci and P.K. Subban were getting rough behind the net in the first period. With Price out of his net, Krejci sent the puck back to the point. Before any whistles were blown of Kaberle knew the play was dead, he actually passed the puck to Johnny Boychuk with a clean look (if he looked) at an empty net.

In Kaberle’s defense, he looked much better on the the power play when Subban went off for tripping Daniel Paille in the third period. Still, you really have to wonder whether the B’s will re-sign him for the money he commands after such a bad run.

– This was not Thomas’ most impressive showing. Though he came up with a big stop on a Tomas Plekanec on a second-period breakaway, the goals from Cammalleri and Weber came as the result of big rebounds. Further evidence that having the best goaltender in the playoffs doesn’t guarantee success. Thomas is human, as is Price, though the latter has two wins.

– Bad night for Dennis Seidenberg. The 29-year-old was a minus-2 on the night, while his interference penalty at 2:14 of the first gave the Habs the power play on which Darche scored.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE BRUINS

– For at least the middle portion of the second period, the Bruins did a better job going to the net and making things difficult for Price. That culminated in their first goal of the series when Bergeron charged down the middle and tipped home a centering pass from Brad Marchand. For the next few minutes, the Bruins got traffic in front, battled for position and weren’€™t afraid to jam away at rebounds and harass the Montreal netminder. Had the Bruins played like that for the whole game, it might be a different story heading to Montreal for Game 3.

– Shane Hnidy fighting Wisniewski in the second period following the Habs defenseman’s charging call was brilliant. At that point in the game, Hnidy had played 2:58 to Wisniewski’s 10:00. The Bruins will send their reserve blueliner to the box any day of the week if it means a top-four defenseman on the other team is doing the same.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Carey Price, David Krejci, Patrice Bergeron
Bruins fail to make things difficult for Carey Price in Game 1 loss 04.14.11 at 11:26 pm ET
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On paper, it would appear the Bruins dominated Thursday night’€™s Game 1 but just happened to run into a hot goaltending performance from Carey Price. After all, they outshot the Canadiens, 31-20, on the night, including 18-6 in the second period.

What the stat sheet doesn’€™t show, though, is how many of the Bruins’€™ shots came with no traffic in front, allowing Price to easily get in position and make the save.

‘€œI don’€™t think we did a very good job of taking away his vision,’€ said Bruins coach Claude Julien. ‘€œHe saw a lot of shots tonight and he saw a lot of pucks. We definitely have to get better in that area if we plan on scoring some goals.’€

Of course, screening Price and getting traffic to the net is all about being willing to battle in the dirty areas. You have to be able to take a beating and win the fight for position. The Bruins didn’€™t appear willing to do that Thursday night, even when they had the chance to.

‘€œI think for the most part, we were there and had those opportunities to be in front of the net,’€ Brad Marchand said. ‘€œWe were just standing off to the side a bit, looking for tips. The opportunity is there to get in front of his eyes. We just have to do that.’€

Julien agreed with his forward that his team simply didn’€™t work hard enough to get to those areas.

‘€œIt’€™s pretty obvious, I think. There’€™s no secret here,’€ Julien said. ‘€œIf you’€™re going to score goals on that goaltender, you need to take away his vision, and we didn’€™t do a good enough job of that. We were all around the net, but we weren’€™t in front.’€

Those problems carried over to the power play, too. The Bruins struggled to get set up on the man advantage early in the game, but they did a better job of possessing the puck and creating some chances as the game went on.

But as was the case at even strength, Price was able to track pretty much every shot. In several instances, the Bruins delayed shooting the puck in the hopes that someone would get to the net for a screen, deflection or rebound, but it rarely came. When they did pull the trigger, Price was able to easily cover or his defensemen were able to easily clear away the rebound.

‘€œAgain, same old, same old,’€ Julien said. ‘€œWe had some great shots, but we didn’€™t do a very good job in front of the net with the screens, with the loose pucks, and weren’€™t able to capitalize.’€

The Bruins were happy with a lot of other aspects of their game Thursday night — Marchand even said they ‘€œhave to play the exact same way’€ in Saturday’€™s Game 2 — but they know they’€™ll need to make things tougher for Price and not rely on him making mistakes if they’€™re going to win the series.

‘€œHe’€™s a good goalie, yes, but we’€™ve got to make sure we have traffic in front of him,’€ Patrice Bergeron said. ‘€œHe’€™s going to make those stops if he sees it, and that’€™s all.’€

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, Carey Price, Patrice Bergeron
Tim Thomas gets start Saturday, aims for record 04.09.11 at 12:23 pm ET
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In what will likely be his final start of the regular season, Tim Thomas looks to break the NHL’s single-season save percentage record Saturday afternoon against the Senators. Through 56 games thus far, Thomas’ save percentage stands at .9376, .001 ahead of Dominik Hasek‘s record-setting mark of .9366 in 1998-99.

Before Saturday’s game, coach Claude Julien said he’s focused more on just making sure Thomas is ready for the playoffs than he is on the record.

“He seems to be feeling good,” Julien said. “He’s realized that he’s forced his game a little bit, especially the game in New York [on Monday], but other than that, I think he’s been pretty steady for us all year. He feels well-rested, he feels good and he feels ready to get into the playoffs.”

Julien made a couple changes to the lineup for Saturday’s game, giving both Patrice Bergeron and Dennis Seidenberg the day off. This will be the first game Seidenberg has missed all season. Tyler Seguin will take Bergeron’s place as the second-line center, while Shane Hnidy will fill in for Seidenberg on the blue line.

Read More: Claude Julien, Dennis Seidenberg, Patrice Bergeron, Tim Thomas
Tim Thomas, Shawn Thornton among those to pick up Bruins awards 04.06.11 at 7:12 pm ET
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The Bruins gave out their regular season awards prior to Wednesday night’s game. They are as follows:

Eddie Shore Award (exceptional hustle and determination): Shawn Thornton

Elizabeth Dufresne Award (outstanding performance in home games): Tim Thomas

John Bucyk Award (greatest off-ice charitable contributions): Andrew Ference

Three stars:

1. Tim Thomas
2. Patrice Bergeron
3. Milan Lucic

Read More: Andrew Ference, Milan Lucic, Patrice Bergeron, Shawn Thornton
Brad Marchand having a ‘pretty insane time’ playing with Patrice Bergeron and Mark Recchi, winning awards 04.02.11 at 8:50 pm ET
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Talk about quite the rookie ride. It’s been Brad Marchand – not Tyler Seguin – everyone one is talking about and scouting for that matter, as a first-year Bruin heading into the playoffs.

After scoring 21 goals and adding 19 assists in 72 games, the Bruins winger was honored before Saturday’s division-clinching 3-2 win over the Thrashers as the 2010-11 Bruins “Seventh Player Award” given to the Bruins player who goes above and beyond the call of duty and exceeded expectations, as voted on by Bruins fans.

“Well, it was a question mark whether I was going to be on the team this year, so it’€™s a honor to win that award,” Marchand said. “It’€™s special.

“I think I was expected to be defensively responsible and bring energy into the game. Now I think I still have to do the exact same thing, but maybe bring a little more offense.”

Marchand celebrated the honor by picking up his 20th assist on Boston’s first goal Saturday, a score by Mark Recchi.

Technically still a rookie after 20 games last season, Marchand has earned the trust of his coaching staff by playing the left wing on the team’s second line, playing with Patrice Bergeron and Recchi.

“It’€™s huge, they’€™re great offensive players,” Marchand said. “They’€™re both very smart. They make a lot of unbelievable plays that you don’€™t see coming a lot of times. So with guys like that, you’€™re expected to produce. It’€™s a pretty insane time playing with guys as good as them.”

“I think it’€™s very deserving and that’€™s certainly not to take away some of the other guys that have made tremendous steps as well,” Bruins coach Claude Julien said. “But, he’€™s one of those guys that obviously surpassed maybe a lot of our expectations, obviously not his because he had made that prediction. But nonetheless, I think he’€™s been a real good player for us from starting off on the fourth line and really making that line probably one of the best fourth lines we’€™ve had here for a long, long time and obviously was probably one of the best fourth lines in the League.

“He graduated obviously with Bergy [Patrice Bergeron] and Rex [Mark Recchi] and those guys have certainly, as much as he’€™s benefited from them, they’€™ve benefited from him as well. They know that. He’€™s such a good skater and he plays hard every night. He’€™s been a real good player for us and I think it’€™s going to be exciting to see him jump into the playoffs, just by the way he is. He’€™s going to be pumped for that and I think he’€™s going to be a really good asset for our hockey club.”

Marchand is expected to receive consideration for the NHL’s Calder Trophy, awarded to the league’s top rookie. The favorites are considered Carolina’s Jeff Skinner and San Jose’s Logan Couture.

But that obviously isn’t the trophy foremost on Marchand’s mind.

“We didn’€™t come into this season wanting to win this division,” Marchand said of the Northeast title Saturday. “We have a goal, and that’€™s to win the Stanley Cup. So it’€™s a stepping stone, and it’€™s a good accomplishment for a great team. But there’€™s a long way to go before we accomplish our goal. It’€™s special, but at the same time we’€™re a long ways away.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Bruins seventh player award, Calder Trophy
Bruins tied with Thrashers after one at 1:43 pm ET
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The name of the game was easy goals in the first period Saturday, and thanks to a softy allowed by each team, the Bruins and Thrashers are tied at one.

Mark Recchi scored his 14th of the season when a shot from Patrice Bergeron trickled through the legs of Ondrej Pavelec and needed just a tap-in to make it 1-0. The Thrashers tied it up when Tuukka Rask took a delay of game penalty and let a Dustin Byfuglen shot bounce off him and in. The Thrashers are 1-for-2 on the power play, while the B’s are 0-for-1.

The Bruins are outshooting the Thrashers, 6-4.

Read More: Brad Marchand, Mark Recchi, Patrice Bergeron, Tuukka Rask
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