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Claude Julien still wants more out of improving Bergeron line 11.04.14 at 10:56 pm ET
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Part of the Bruins’€™ early-season struggles was that the team’€™s sure things weren’€™t sure things. Zdeno Chara wasn’€™t enjoying a strong start prior to his injury, while Patrice Bergeron‘€™s line was getting beaten far more than usual.

Obviously, it’€™s going to take some time for things to return to normal. Chara is in the second week of his recovery from a torn PCL and, assuming his recovery is on track, is expected to remain out for 2-4 more weeks. The Bergeron line, on the other hand, appears to be turning a corner.

Claude Julien broke up the trio of Bergeron between Brad Marchand and Reilly Smith three games ago, at which point Bergeron was an uncharacteristic minus-2 on the season and Marchand was looking for his first even-strength goal of the season. Smith, Julien had said multiple times, looked like he was behind after missing most of training camp because he didn’€™t have a contract.

Smith was put back on Bergeron’€™s line after a period in Buffalo and Marchand was returned to the line by the end of the game. It seems Julien got the attention of his most trusted line, as Marchand now has four goals (three of which came playing with Bergeron and Smith) and two assists in the last three games, while both Bergeron and Smith have two points apiece in the span.

The Bruins have won all three games, two of which came on overtime winners from Marchand. Both of the Bruins’€™ goals in Tuesday’€™s 2-1 overtime victory came from the Bergeron line, as Bergeron scored his first goal in 12 games with a second-period tally.

“I think tonight was a real big step forward for us,” Marchand said. “We played with a lot more confidence than we have in the past number of games, and it seems like were able to make plays now and hold on. I think that’€™s one thing we weren’€™t doing very well early on — we were throwing it away a lot, and weren’€™t supporting each other very well, but our legs seemed to be under us, we seemed to be more comfortable with the puck, and we felt really good tonight.”

Though the results are showing more and more, Julien said he feels the line isn’t yet where he wants it to be.

“I think the puck movement between them still isn’€™t quite where we’€™ve seen it before,” Julien said. “There’€™s still room for improvement and they’€™ve just got to keep working at it, because they’€™ve got one guy right now that’€™s really hot.”

Smith was strong on the puck and looked lightyears more confident than in games past Tuesday. Julien still expects more out of him. Reminded of his past critiques of the player and asked if he felt Smith had caught up, Julien was noncommittal. Asked again about Smith, Julien reiterated his stance that he feels the whole line could do more.

“He’€™s trying to get himself going,” Julien said of Smith. “I don’€™t think he’€™s playing bad ‘€” I mean, he’€™s just one of those guys with that line ‘€“ I think that whole line, the three of them together, are starting to come around. Two goals from that line tonight, so you can’€™t complain.”

Given Julien’€™s lack of praise, Smith was asked after the game whether he felt his coach was hard on him. Smith’s vague answer suggested the answer might be yes, but Julien trying to motivate his young players is nothing new.

“I think here, everyone’€™s used to that as a hockey player,” Smith said. “You get used to it. You have pretty thick skin. I think if you don’€™t have it, you’€™re not going to go too far.”

Bergeron is a two-time Selke Trophy winner as the league’s top two-way forward, while Marchand and Smith are both looking to prove they can have consistent seasons after streaky showings last season. When that line is at its best, its among the most difficult in the league to oppose. Julien doesn’t think it’s there yet, but the positive steps its taken has helped the Bruins get wins at a time when they need them.

Read More: Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron, Reilly Smith,
Andy Brickley on MFB: ‘Maybe the [Patrice] Bergeron line needs a little change of scenery’ 10.29.14 at 1:26 pm ET
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Andy Brickley

Andy Brickley

NESN Bruins analyst Andy Brickley made his weekly appearance on Middays with MFB to discuss the Bruins’ disappointing start to the season. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

The Bruins blew a two-goal lead and dropped a 4-3 decision to the Wild on Tuesday night, putting their record at 5-6 on the young season. Brickley said the team is “treading water,” evidenced by Tuesday’s performance.

“It was 3-1 after two periods, but the Bruins were not playing all that well,” Brickley said. “That score did not indicate that the Bruins were the better team through 40 minutes. There were just too many mistakes, lack of focus, poor decision-making, getting beat on the backcheck, the defense for Minnesota was jumping into the play. And every line was guilty, none more so than the [Patrice] Bergeron line.”

Brickley said coach Claude Julien might have to resort to mixing up lines in an attempt to jump-start the team.

“It’s that one step forward, one step back that has plagued this team this year, and that’s that lack of focus and the lack of compete and consistency, just not there. It’s really hard to understand, because the core group is together and should be well schooled in all these areas and understand what they have in front of them in terms of not wanting to chase it the first two months of the season and get too far behind in the standings.

“As a coach in these situations you try to emphasize the positive things when you think that’s the right approach. Sometimes you’ve got to call guys out — not in public, but certainly within the room. Claude right now is very frustrated on what he needs to do to get this team to play better. You may even have to see some line juggling. Maybe you keep that [Carl] Soderberg line together to give you the one constant. The way the [David] Krejci line produced last night, maybe you keep them together. But I don’t know, maybe the Bergeron line needs a little change of scenery because it’s not working right now.

“You could appeal to players’ sense of, you know, ‘We’ve got to win some hockey games here, boys, and we’ve got to play better and we’ve got to do the little things that make us a good team, and we’ve got to work together as five-man units,’ because they’re just not getting the results. It’s hard to explain, it’s hard to get your hands around. And that’s the challenge for the coaching staff right now.”

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Read More: Andy Brickley, Claude Julien, Matt Bartkowski, Patrice Bergeron
How Bruins overcame uncharacteristically bad nights from Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara 10.21.14 at 11:51 pm ET
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Gregory Campbell was one of many Bruins who came up big Tuesday night. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Gregory Campbell was one of many Bruins who came up big Tuesday night. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Usually the Patrice Bergeron line and Zdeno Chara-Dougie Hamilton pairing are the Bruins’€™ constants. They’€™re the guys who are going to create offensive-zone possessions and not make mistakes.

That wasn’€™t the case on Tuesday. Bergeron was on the ice for all three of the Sharks’€™ goals, linemates Brad Marchand and Reilly Smith joined him for two of them (it is worth noting that Marchand had a nice power-play goal), and Chara was on the ice for two of them as well. Those four and Hamilton were the only Bruins who finished with Corsi-for percentages under 50 percent, meaning they were the only Bruins who were on the ice for more 5-on-5 shot attempts against than shot attempts for.

That would seemingly be a recipe for disaster for the Bruins, especially when you consider that outside of the Carl Soderberg line, the rest of the team had been one giant question mark to this point in the season. David Krejci had looked good since his return, but linemate Milan Lucic was off to a slow start and he still didn’€™t have a set-in-stone right wing. The fourth line had featured several different combinations, and none of them had really done much. And the second and third defense pairings had been inconsistent at best, with Kevan Miller’€™s injury raising even more questions on the back end.

At least for one night, those questions turned into answers. Lucic, Krejci and rookie right wing Seth Griffith factored into four of the Bruins’€™ five goals, with Lucic notching three assists and Griffith scoring his first NHL goal. Two of the goals they were on the ice for — Griffith’€™s and Torey Krug’€™s — came as the direct result of getting bodies to the net. Krejci set a great screen on Krug’€™s, and then Lucic created some net-front havoc that freed up Griffith on his goal.

“I think it definitely was the best game that we’€™ve played so far this season,” Lucic said. “You saw we were hungry in the O-zone and hungry getting pucks to the net. We made some smart decisions in some important areas and it just seems like things are starting to head in the right direction.”

The fourth line of Daniel Paille, Gregory Campbell and Simon Gagne was a positive possession line that even created some chances against the Sharks’€™ top two lines. They scored what proved to be the game-winner midway through the third when Paille won the puck along the boards and threw a shot on net that Campbell tipped in for his first goal of the season.

Campbell and Paille were also big on the penalty kill, especially late in the game when Bergeron went to the box for a four-minute double minor. Until Krejci’€™s empty-netter to seal the win, Campbell had the biggest play on that kill when he blocked a Joe Thornton shot that came off a Chara turnover.

“We’€™ve got to be a responsible, reliable line, and Claude [Julien] has to trust us to put us in those situations,” Campbell said. “With hard work comes trust, and if we’€™re playing our game and we’€™re in on the forecheck and creating chances and bringing energy to the lineup, then he usually has confidence in us.”

As for the bottom two defense pairings, the only glaring error was a bad miscommunication between Krug and Dennis Seidenberg that led to a goal, but as Julien pointed out after the game, Bergeron’€™s line was just as much at fault, as Smith had failed to clear the zone and Bergeron and Marchand had gotten caught up ice.

Outside of that, the Seidenberg-Krug and Matt Bartkowski-Adam McQuaid pairings played well. Krug’€™s goal and two assists obviously stand out, but let’€™s not overlook the fact that Seidenberg had seven shots on goal and 12 shot attempts, and that he and Krug had Corsi-for percentages of 63 and 62 percent, respectively. McQuaid and Bartkowski weren’€™t far behind at 61 and 57 percent, respectively, and McQuaid was also big on that final penalty kill.

Obviously this is just one game. No one should think that all of the Bruins’€™ question marks are gone and that everyone’€™s going to be great from here on. But on a night when the Bruins’€™ best players were uncharacteristically unreliable, it was encouraging to see everyone else step up and show that they can lead the way, too.

Read More: David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg, Gregory Campbell, Milan Lucic
David Krejci, Reilly Smith provide offense as Bruins beat Red Wings, end losing streak 10.15.14 at 11:02 pm ET
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David Krejci and Reilly Smith each scored in regulation, and then they each scored in the shootout as the Bruins beat the Red Wings, 3-2, Wednesday night to end their three-game losing streak.

Krejci opened the scoring 5:12 into the game with his first goal of the season after Chris Kelly forced a neutral-zone turnover and sprung Krejci up the middle of the ice. The Red Wings answered a few minutes later when Tomas Tatar took advantage of some sloppy defensive play and ripped a shot under the crossbar.

The Bruins regained the lead with 6:29 left in the second. Brad Marchand retrieved a dump-in deep in the offensive zone and calmly moved the puck to Patrice Bergeron, who then tried a wraparound that led to a juicy rebound for Smith to bury.

The Red Wings answered again, though, when Gustav Nyquist fired a laser shot past Tuukka Rask for a power-play goal 2:56 into the third. The Bruins failed to capitalize on two power plays of their own in the third period, and Jimmy Howard made several big saves in the final minute — most notably on a Simon Gagne rebound bid — to force overtime.

The Bruins were the better team in overtime, but couldn’t finish their chances. The best opportunity came on a 3-on-1 a minute and a half in, but Smith tried to force a pass that was easily broken up. The B’s had to kill a 41-second Wings power play to end the overtime after Brendan Smith drew a call on Bergeron with a pretty blatant embellishment.

Here are some other observations from the game:

-For the second time in as many games against Detroit, the Bruins suffered a Patrice Bergeron injury scare. Last week Bergeron missed most of the second period after crashing awkwardly into the boards. On Wednesday he limped off the ice late in the second after blocking a Danny DeKeyser slap shot. Fortunately for the Bruins, Bergeron was back on the ice for the start of the third period. As he so often is, Bergeron was the Bruins’€™ best forward Wednesday night. He went 17-for-24 on faceoffs and posted a .740 Corsi, and his line registered 12 shots on goal to go along with Smith’€™s second-period tally.

-This is partially tied into Bergeron since they played with that line a lot, but Zdeno Chara and Dougie Hamilton were great, as they usually are. They had Corsis of 78 percent and 79 percent, respectively, which is very good. Hamilton was also a force in overtime, as he jumped into the offense several times and helped create scoring chances.

-The Bruins absolutely dominated the first period, outshooting the Red Wings 14-4 in the opening 20 minutes. They spent entire shifts in the offensive zone and won the majority of 1-on-1 battles. The scoreboard didn’€™t reflect that dominance, though, as the two teams entered the intermission tied at 1-1. Even on the Red Wings’€™ goal, they hadn’€™t really established any sort of possession in the Bruins’€™ zone, as it came off a turnover that led to a bouncing puck around the net.

-It was a particularly interesting first period for Chris Kelly. He made a great play to set up Krejci’€™s goal, as he forced a turnover in the neutral zone and then made a nice pass through the seam to spring Krejci. Just a few minutes later, though, it was a turnover of his own that led to Tatar’€™s goal, as Kelly failed to handle a pass up the boards from Dennis Seidenberg. On the whole, though, it was another good game for Kelly and linemates Carl Soderberg and Loui Eriksson. Kelly’€™s five shots on goal were tied for the team lead.

-The Bruins’€™ penalty kill had been very good until Nyquist’€™s power-play goal in the third period. Before that, the B’€™s had allowed just two shots on goal on the Red Wings’€™ first three power plays and made it tough for the Wings to get set up. On the fourth, though, they gave the dangerous Nyquist too much room to operate and he made them pay by walking in and snapping a shot past Rask.

-Considering it was his first game since April 2013, Simon Gagne looked pretty good. He played 12:13 and recorded four shot attempts and two shots on goal, one of which nearly won the game in the final minute of regulation. He started the game on the fourth line with Daniel Paille and Ryan Spooner, but wound up seeing some time with Krejci and Milan Lucic as the game went on.

Read More: Chris Kelly, David Krejci, Dougie Hamilton, Patrice Bergeron
Bruins never get going in loss to Red Wings 10.09.14 at 10:13 pm ET
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Tuukka Rask started in back-to-back games to begin the season. (Getty Images)

Tuukka Rask started in back-to-back games to begin the season. (Getty Images)

The Bruins didn’€™t have the puck enough to avoid a 2-1 loss to the Red Wings Thursday at Joe Louis Arena.

The Bruins didn’€™t get their first shot on goal until 12:01 of the first period, but fortunately for them, it went in for Patrice Bergeron‘€™s first goal of the season. Bergeron intercepted a Jonathan Ericsson pass in the Detroit zone, took a couple of strides towards the net and ripped a shot over the glove of Jimmy Howard to give Boston a 1-0 lead.

The Red Wings would continue to dominate possession until Justin Abdelkader tied it 3:52 into the second period. Gustav Nyquist would make it 2-1 at 14:46 of the second on a power play goal off a pass from Darren Helm after Craig Cunningham struggled to get the puck out of the zone.

The B’€™s survived an injury scare from Bergeron, who left the ice after his first shift of the second period after hitting the boards oddly. Following the game, Claude Julien told reporters that Bergeron’s absence was a result of the B’s following the league’s concussion testing protocol. Bergeron ended up being OK, returning to the game 13 minutes later but he taking a slashing penalty that led to Nyquist’€™s goal.

The B’€™s got a break late in the game when Johan Franzen elbowed Bergeron at 17:26, but Chara was penalized for goaltender interference 48 seconds into the Bruins’€™ power play. Up until Chara’€™s penalty, the Bruins went with the aggressive move of pulling Tuukka Rask to give them a 6-on-4 advantage.

Boston mustered only 17 shots on goal in the game.

Here are some observations from the game:

– The Bruins squandered a good opportunity when, 41 seconds into 4-on-4 play that followed Brad Marchand embellishing a Henrik Zetterberg call, Tomas Tatar went off for tripping Kevan Miller to give the Bruins a 1:19 4-on-3. With more space in the offensive zone, the B’€™s foursome of Zdeno Chara, Torey Krug, Ryan Spooner and Reilly Smith fell victim to overpassing, most notably from Spooner, who got lots of pucks sent his way low in the zone but dished rather than going to the net.

The B’€™s wasted another power play when Brendan Smith was sent off for slashing Chris Kelly. Boston had no shots on goal during the ensuing man advantage.

– Jimmy Howard robbed Brad Marchand‘€™s wrist shot from the right circle just under midway through the third period off a nice pass from Reilly Smith. Marchand also rang iron on Boston’s final power play in the closing minutes. The Bruins’€™ chances were few and far between Thursday, with Marchand’€™s bids among their better chances in the third.

– The Bruins’€™ lineup was as follows:

Marchand – Bergeron – Smith
Kelly – Soderberg – Eriksson
Lucic – Spooner – Fraser
Paille – Cunningham – Robins

Chara – Hamilton
Seidenberg – Adam McQuaid
Torey Krug – Kevan Miller

Read More: Patrice Bergeron,
In showdown of elite centers, Patrice Bergeron dominates Flyers’ Claude Giroux at 12:23 am ET
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In theory, Wednesday night’€™s season opener between the Bruins and Flyers should have given us a great back-and-forth battle between two of the NHL‘€™s best centers. Patrice Bergeron and Claude Giroux both finished in the top five in Hart Trophy voting last season, and their lines were matched against each other for most of the game Wednesday night.

But instead of that great battle, what we got was a total beatdown in favor of the Bruins. Bergeron, Brad Marchand and Reilly Smith dominated Giroux, Brayden Schenn and Jakub Voracek all game long, rendering one of the best players in the league virtually invisible.

Bergeron won 10 of the 12 faceoffs he took against Giroux and ended up with a plus-16 Corsi (22 shot attempts for, 6 against), according to hockeystats.ca, while Giroux finished the night with a minus-18 Corsi (6 attempts for, 24 against). Bergeron and his linemates combined for seven shots on goal, while Giroux and his managed just two. It seemed like every time the two lines were on the ice, the puck was in the Flyers’€™ zone, and the numbers reflect that.

“They take pride in being a better line than the line that they’€™re facing up against,”€ Claude Julien said. “It’€™s just a trait that they have. They worked hard. You have to give them credit, too, for how they checked against that line because it had a lot of potential to be dangerous offensively. But those guys did a pretty good job of taking away those opportunities.”

The key was winning battles. Bergeron is one of the best faceoff men in the NHL, but it’€™s not like he won all 10 of those faceoffs cleanly. Some of them required him outworking Giroux on a second or third attempt to win the puck back, and some of them required Marchand or Smith to jump in and beat the opponent to a loose puck.

Battles in the corner led to longer offensive-zone possessions. One of the best examples of this came with around 9:40 left in the second when Bergeron won a 1-on-1 battle in the corner to the left of the Flyers’ net. He came away with the puck and moved it back to Zdeno Chara at the left point. Chara then moved it over to Adam McQuaid, who sent a shot through a nice Smith screen, one that he was able to set by winning a battle for position. The shot didn’€™t go in, but it wasn’€™t an easy save either. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Brad Marchand, Claude Giroux, Jakub Voracek, Patrice Bergeron
Patrice Bergeron is in weirdest NHL 15 commercial 08.29.14 at 11:47 am ET
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There’s no two ways about it: This NHL 15 commercial, starring Patrice Bergeron, is the weirdest.

Bergeron, who was voted the cover athlete of the EA Sports video game, beat out P.K. Subban to get on the cover. That means more bright lights for the quiet and humble center, and, apparently, poetry. This is a far cry from Bergeron’s license plate commercial from when he was a rookie in 2003-04.

As I’m posting this, I remember that GIFs exist. This is going to be interesting.

This is also weird, but less weird because it’s Brad Marchand:

 

 

Read More: Patrice Bergeron,
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