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Bruins general manager Chiarelli speaks at practice 02.28.10 at 11:27 am ET
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WILMINGTON — Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli made an appearance at practice at Ristuccia Arena on Sunday and spoke about the trade deadline and what he expects going into the stretch run towards the playoffs. Here is the transcript from the interview.

On how much activity he expects when the roster freeze is lifted at 11:59 p.m. tonight:

It wouldn’t surprise me if there were a few deals tomorrow morning, tomorrow. My guess is that there will be the same number of deals that there always has been. We are in on a couple of deals but there has not been much traction over the course of the Olympic break, but we will see what happens next couple of days.

On how much talk there has been:

Definitely the talk has picked up. The fact that there is nothing pressing and you can’t do a deal, it is not idle chatter but it is more standard discussions. But, at the end of the day you can’t do a deal until tomorrow.

On what the Bruins are doing:

We are in on a couple of things and we will see where they go, otherwise we don’t have a lot of traction on these things.

On what the ideal pickup would be for the Bruins:

Well, obviously, you look at the statistics and it is our scoring. We want to get some type of top-nine forward that has an offensive bent to his game. There are not many out there.

On the type of deal the Bruins would probably end up with:

Yeah, it would probably be a rental. The nature of my discussions to this point, I wouldn’t necessarily name them as “hockey moves” but non-rentals. It is hard now because no one, well, one, there are only four or five teams that are sellers and two, no one amongst the buyers wants to do a significant hockey move right now because they are in a cluster and they don’t want to mix and do something significant to their team.

On trade prices:

Yeah, they are high and will remain high.

What about prices with so few sellers on the market?

It allows those sellers to enter the market at high prices and that is what has happened. That is not a surprise, that is the way that the market has been set.

On what he saw on the four-game road trip before the break:

I thought it was tremendous for the four games. Much like I saw towards the tail end of the losing streak, I saw a lot of good things. I thought we got a little sloppy at the end of the winning streak but I was impressed with the way they won four in a row. That is tough to do. I thought they pulled it together and obviously the results speak volumes in those four games. I like the way they pulled it together knowing there was a break coming. To me that speaks to the synergy of the team too.

On whether the last several games before the break changed his desire to make a move at the deadline:

Well, on its face we need some more goal scoring. But, I also know that if I don’t get it, I know that these guys are better than they are. I would demand that from them and expect it from them. What I saw in maybe the last five or six games, including that four-game winning streak, was more chances, more willingness to go to the net and do all those little things that you have to do. That is quite promising.

On the expected performance of the Olympic players, especially David Krejci:

Well, I am sure it was refreshing to David to go out and not just do well but exceptionally well. It was a change and, as a matter of fact, David has been playing well the last couple of weeks. So, it does not surprise me that he has gone out there and played well. Then I saw his games and he played very well. These guys are going, the guys that are playing yesterday and today, they are going to be tired. You know, so you are going to see that at the start, they are going to be tired.

On how hard it is to evaluate the team during the Olympic break with the thought of trades in mind:

Well, it is hard. But, we have to take a broader viewpoint. You don’t just base it on your last game. The harder thing was talking about your team, talking about your needs with other GMs knowing you can’t do anything. But everyone faces that.

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Peter Chiarelli on D&H: Not trading high pick 02.01.10 at 2:54 pm ET
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Since the Bruins’ stunning win over Philadelphia in the Winter Classic, 2010 has not been kind to the B’s. General manager Peter Chiarelli was on with Dale & Holley Monday to talk about potential moves that could be made to kick start a Bruins playoff run.

Chiarelli voiced his displeasure with the overall performance of the team but said there is no way he parts with the valuable pick that he received from Toronto in the Phil Kessel trade.

‘€œI’€™m not going to trade the pick that we received from Toronto for this year,’€ he stated. ‘€œI’€™ve said that before on other conversations, and I have had other conversations regarding everything else.’€

The GM said the players need to step up, including No. 1 goaltender Tim Thomas, to right the ship on Causeway Street. He said that he has seen some improvements over the last couple of games, but under no circumstance would Chiarelli give away secrets to the show.

‘€œI’€™d like to tell you exactly what I’€™m doing, but I’€™m not going to,’€ he said.

Here is a transcript of the interview, to hear the interview click here.

What do you make of all the moves and trades that the Toronto Maple Leafs made this weekend?

This isn’€™t a comment on those trades, but if we are going to make something it has to be the right deal and it’€™s not for lack of trying right now. I’€™m not beating the bushes so to speak. It has to be the right deal if we are going to do something. Those deals, I think Calgary was trying to shake things up and I think Toronto was building for the future.

Would you shake things up here in Boston?

It’€™s not easy to make a trade, and that’€™s where we are at right now.

Have you received or presented a deal with the draft picks you have from Toronto?

I’€™m not going to trade the pick that we received from Toronto for this year. I’€™ve said that before on other conversations, and I have had other conversations regarding everything else. If it is picks to players I’€™m all ears.

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Turn up the volume: Chiarelli on H1N1 11.05.09 at 7:01 pm ET
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Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli addressed the media prior to Thursday night’s game against Montreal announced the club’€™s medical staff has confirmed a diagnosis of H1N1 for David Krejci.

Based on Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations, Krejci will be isolated from the rest of the team until he is symptom and fever free for 24 hours.

Chiarelli said the team is taking all precautions to ensure that facilities are kept sanitized.

Chiarelli said the team is taking this diagnosis very seriously.

Chiarelli admitted this adds to a very frustrating time for a team trying to find it’s early season rhythm.

Read More: Boston Bruins, H1N1, NHL, Peter Chiarelli
Bruins lock up another young asset in Rask at 6:44 pm ET
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Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli had a bright young hockey asset taken from him last summer when Toronto leveraged the threat of a contract offer sheet into a trade for Phil Kessel just prior to the season’€™s start.

 

Give the B’€™s GM full marks for not letting that happen again as he locked up another talented youngster in Tuukka Rask to a two-year contract extension that will take the Finnish netminder through the 2011-2012 season. Reports have the salary pinned between $2.6-2.8 million overall with a cap hit in the $1.35 million neighborhood, but exact figures haven’€™t yet been unearthed.

 

The 22-year-old was set to become a restricted free agent following the current season, but ‘€“ along with Milan Lucic ‘€“ Chiarelli made the determination to keep his prized youngster away from potentially damaging offer sheets.

 

‘€œI guess you’€™ve got to change with the times,’€ said Chiarelli about getting more proactive toward locking up players mid-season, particularly younger players with expiring rookie contracts. ‘€œTo a certain degree I went through it this summer with Phil [Kessel] and Toronto and I have to consider that. I have to put that into the equation now.’€

 

Rask is 2-1-1 in four games with a 2.41 goals against average and a .915 save percentage, and has already flashed the kind of cool, calm collected style between the pipes that’€™s made him one of the best goaltending prospects in the world.

 

The Bruins still have restricted free agents Blake Wheeler and Mark Stuart to contend with following this season as well as an organizationally important negotiation with unrestricted free agent Marc Savard. Tying up Rask allows Chiarelli to concentrate on other matters at hand with his goaltending completely covered for the next three seasons.

 

–The picture cleared a little bit more for swine-flu ridden center David Krejci, who will miss at least two games while recovering from a bout with the H1N1 virus diagnosed on Thursday. Krejci will be away from the ice for at least the next 3-5 days in quarantine, and might miss a third game when the Bruins taken on the Penguins next Tuesday night at TD Garden.

 

‘€œHe had a raspy throat and it kind of sunk it into his chest and that’€™s when they brought him to get it diagnosed. [He'€™ll be] 3-5 days in quarantine, so he’€™ll spend that time at home in quarantine.’€

Read More: David Krejci, Peter Chiarelli, Tuukka Rask,
Bruins: Krejci diagnosed with H1N1 at 10:56 am ET
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BOSTON, MA – Boston Bruins General Manager Peter Chiarelli announced today that the club’€™s medical staff has confirmed a diagnosis of H1N1 for David Krejci.  Based on Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations, Krejci will be isolated from the rest of the team until he is symptom and fever free for 24 hours.

‘€œLike most people, we are taking many precautions to try to prevent our players and staff from contracting the H1N1 virus,’€ said Chiarelli.  ‘€œOur medical staff is working with David to get him healthy as soon as possible, and our players and staff will continue to take precautions with hopes of preventing the spread of the virus to others in the organization.’€

Read More: Boston Bruins, David Krejci, Peter Chiarelli,
Kessel set to suit up for the Maple Leafs 11.03.09 at 1:06 pm ET
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It’s clear now that it was first and foremost all about the money for Phil Kessel, and secondly about some measure of respect he didn’t feel from the organization while constantly hearing his name bandied about in trade rumors through three strangely turbulent years with the Boston Bruins.

Phil the Thrill got his wish to escape from Boston and the Spoked B way of doing things, and the 22-year-old scorer savant informed reporters Tuesday afternoon that he will indeed play his first game for the Toronto Maple Leafs tonight. Kessel will be riding shotgun with veteran center Matt Stajan and Jason Blake. That’s not exactly the same as skating alongside Marc Savard, but it’s the best that Toronto can muster at this point.

It’s exactly six months since Kessel went under the knife for rotator cuff and labrum surgery in his left shoulder, and the sniper returned a solid 7-10 days prior to previous expectations and timetables.

It’s not the miraculous early return that allowed cetner David Krejci to play Bruins’ Opening Night after undergoing surgery on his right hip, but it also doesn’t sound like a slow, deliberate recovery by a player viewed by those in and around the Boston organization as being “soft” in terms of focus, work ethic and play on the ice. The arrows were released against the 36-goal scorer last summer when it became apparent the big money in Toronto was too good to pass up, but there’s one thing that isn’t under dispute about Kessel’s game: the kid can score.

Kessel is the age of many players either playing or just leaving the college hockey ranks in the United States, and — as one scout said about Kessel when things were heating up — “he’s just a young pup” in terms of hockey development. Former BU defenseman and current New York Rangers rookie Matt Gilroy is one of the heralded youngsters in the league this season, and he is three years older than Kessel. That’s something that seems to escape most people in the Kessel argument. There is a high ceiling for a player that finished 12th in the NHL in goals scorer last season, but the B’s have gambled that No. 81 will never reach a consistent ceiling of 40-50 goals per season.

He won’t be a savior this year for a Maple Leafs team that already appears to be running headlong into a lost season, and it’s not likely he’ll light up the Tampa Bay Lightning in his first game back since the Stanley Cup semi-finals against the Carolina Hurricanes last May.

But Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli was never able to properly replace Kessel’s playmaking abilities, and supply the team with the simple threat of throwing a natural goal-scorer on the ice. The B’s have a collection of nice 20-30 goal-scorers, but they don’t have a single skater that strikes fear into a goaltender with their combination of speed and pinpoint shooting.

Perhaps the treasure trove of draft picks shuffled off to Boston in exchange for Kessel will bring another elite scorer into the B’s fold beginning next season, but right now Boston isn’t able to absorb Kessel’s defection with heightened play from Marco Sturm, Michael Ryder and Blake Wheeler among others — and that’s been underscored even more with the loss of Marc Savard and Milan Lucic to injury.

The Bruins have scored 10 goals in their last five games and allowed 10 goals in their last five games, and have been mired dead smack dab in the middle for the entire season. Good enough to avoid any long losing streaks, but just middling enough that they can’t string even two wins together through the first 13 games. That will only get worse should — as unlikely as it may seem – Kessel burst off to a fast offensive start with the Leafs despite missing all of training camp and the first month of the season.

Unfair as it might be, Kessel’s gain would only stir up the masses to begin chanting that familiar New England refrain: “Why can’t we get players like that?”

Read More: Marc Savard, Peter Chiarelli, Phil Kessel,
B’s pull off trade with Sabres for Paille 10.20.09 at 7:03 pm ET
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The Boston Bruins made a counter-move Tuesday two days after the Chuck Kobasew deal and traded a pair of 2010 draft picks — a third round pick and a conditional fourth-round pick — for Buffalo Sabres forward Daniel Paille. The hard-edged, skilled Paille had 12 goals and 15 assists for 27 points in Buffalo last season and has one assist in two games for the Sabres this season.

 The 25-year-old Paille had his best season for the Sabres in 2007-08 when he had 19 goals and 16 assists in 77 games. The move gives the Bruins a solid left wing with a cap hit of only $1.125 million that can potentially replace Lucic on the second line for the next two months while the hulking forward recovers from a broken right index finger. Paille will be a restricted free agent following this season. 

According to the Bruins press release, it’s the first trade ever executed between the Boston and Buffalo organizations dating back to their Adams Division days as head-to-head rivals. The Bruins did trade the rights to unsigned free agent Andre Savard to the Sabres for fellow unsigned free agent Peter McNab, but that swap was never officially recognized as a trade by the NHL, according to the Bruins PR staff.

B’s GM Peter Chiarelli was also able to pull off the deal without raiding his treasure chest of nine first and second round draft picks in the 2010 and 2011 NHL drafts. Paille is expected to be available to play Wednesday against the Nashville Predators at TD Garden.

Read More: Chuck Kobasew, Daniel Paille, Peter Chiarelli,
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