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Chiarelli signs multiyear contract extension with Bruins 06.15.09 at 6:19 pm ET
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In a move that was expected to transpire at some point before the NHL draft at the end of June, the Bruins announced Monday afternoon that GM Peter Chiarelli has signed a multiyear contract extension with the Black and Gold. Chiarelli was entering into the fourth and final year of a deal that he signed when he took the B’s reigns back in May 2006. The B’s executive had been negotiating with Jeremy and Charlie Jacobs over the course of the last few months, and it was fully expected that Chiarelli would remain with Boston for next year and beyond.

Chiarelli and Charlie Jacobs will hold a press conference in Legends at the TD Banknorth Garden at noon on Tuesday, and it’s also expected that Chiarelli will discuss his own situation as well as provide updates on the upcoming NHL draft and current contract negotiations with restricted free agents like Phil Kessel and Matt Hunwick.

The B’s GM deserved plaudits — and a new pact — for steadily steering the organization back from oblivion over the three years after taking hold of a beleaguered franchise with an expansion team-level roster. Chiarelli and the B’s staff have stocked an NHL roster full of young, improving players — with some as holdovers from Boston’s prior front office regime – and built the foundation around a pair of big-ticket free agents in Zdeno Chara and Marc Savard.

Young skilled players like Phil Kessel, David Krejci, Blake Wheeler and Milan Lucic have all made the jump to the NHL level during Chiarelli’s tenure, and the B’s GM locked down All-Star goaltender Tim Thomas to a four-year deal earlier this spring. Goaltender Tuukka Rask and center Zach Hamill represent another wave of talented youngsters that have performed well at Providence, and stand ready to support the Boston hockey club in the near future.

Chiarelli was named the NHL’s Executive of the Year by the Sporting News for the 2008-09 season, and watched his hockey team improve by 22 points last season en route to capturing the Eastern Conference title. The B’s season ended in a Game 7 overtime loss to the Carolina Hurricanes in the Stanley Cup semifinals, but the organization is clearly on the right track.

Chiarelli has made missteps — signing Dave Lewis as his first coach and trading away prospect Kris Versteeg rank as the two biggest gaffes during his three seasons in charge of hockey operations. But the GM earned a contract extension for his overwhelmingly impressive body of work in Boston.

The GM’s biggest mandate was to come in and make the Bruins a tough, “hard to play against” unit with equal parts grit and skill, and he’s succeeded in molding a group of players into that classic image of a successful hockey club. Chiarelli’s work remains incomplete as he faces an important summer of negotiations with free agents — and potential trade talks if those contract discussions don’t go as well as expected – amid a shrinking salary cap. With a completed contract extension in hand, Chiarelli is now free to focus on the other tasks calling for his attention.

It’s also expected that Chiarelli will now turn toward a contract extension for head coach Claude Julien and members of his coaching staff — who are all expected to return for the 2009-10 season – after the Jack Adams Award finalist posted 94 wins over the last two seasons behind the Boston bench.

Before joining the B’s in 2006, Chiarelli was under the employ of his hometown Ottawa Senators for seven seasons, five as their director of legal relations and two as assistant GM. Chiarelli played four seasons of college hockey at Harvard, where he served as the team’€™s captain. He had 21 goals and 28 assists for 49 points in 109 collegiate games before earning his degree in economics in 1987.

The elder Jacobs gave plenty of evidence that an agreement was  looming — perhaps to be announced after the Stanley Cup Finals were over — when he spoke with WEEI’s “Dale & Holley” last week.

‘€œI made this observation a few weeks ago. I didn’€™t hire Peter for four years. I hired him for his career. Peter wants to stay a Bruin. He sees this as a long range career relationship and I see the same. It’€™s evolving,’€ said Jeremy Jacobs. ‘€œI kind of see him in a long term executive relationship and I think he sees himself in the same spot.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Charlie Jacobs, Peter Chiarelli,
David Krejci signs three-year, $11.25 million deal with Boston Bruins 06.02.09 at 4:52 pm ET
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The Boston Bruins have announced that 23-year-old center David Krejci and the team have come to an agreement on a multi-year extension that will pay him $11.25 million on Tuesday afternoon. According to TSN.com, the three-year deal will pay Krejci an average of $3.75 million per year, and pays out $3.5 million, $3.75 million and $4 million over the next three seasons. 

Krejci was set to become a restricted free agent on July 1 after enjoying a breakout 73-point season for the Black and Gold and leading the NHL with a +/- of +36 last season. Both Krejci and Bruins General Manager Peter Chiarelli are scheduled for a Wednesday conference call to discuss the contract, but terms of the deal weren’t immediately disclosed. Krejci was part of an important restricted free agent class along with fellow RFA Phil Kessel, and the young Bruins sniper remains unsigned at this point.

It’s expected that Kessel is going to command/demand more dollars than Krejci after finishing among the top 12 in the NHL in terms of goals scored (36) this season. The $3.75 million that Krejci will average over the next three seasons is likely to be the dirt cellar floor of the Kessel negotiations, and the gifted young sniper — capable of breaking games open with his skating speed and snap shot but also prone to disappearing for long stretches of time, particularly when the going gets rough on the ice — is thought to be looking for something much closer to $5 million a year than $3.75 million per season.

With Matt Hunwick and Byron Bitz still also looking for contracts and roughly $10 million to spend on all four restricted free agents plus any roster upgrades, the chances of Kessel getting his payday in Boston don’t appear to be all that likely. It still appears to be Boston’s best to flip Kessel — or somebody else with a high price tag and good value on the trade market — to another NHL spot for a top 2 defenseman of the puck-moving variety.

Both Krejci and Bruins General Manager Peter Chiarelli will discuss the deal during a Wednesday conference call at 4:30 p.m. The skillful young center was also originally scheduled to undergo his hip surgery this week as well, so there should be more information about his medical status during the conference call. Check back with the Big Bad Blog for more details in the coming days.

Read More: Boston Bruins, David Krejci, Peter Chiarelli,
Transcript of Chiarelli on Dale & Holley 05.20.09 at 12:13 pm ET
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Q: I’€™m sure winning this award (NHL Executive of the Year) doesn’€™t feel like congratulations after the end of the season does it?

A: It’€™s a nice distinction but we’€™re still picking up pieces to a degree and looking to see how we’€™re going to face next year, but we have a bit of summer to work with and we’€™ll see where we go.

Q: How are you moving forward from that Game 7 defeat?

A: I’€™m not in a stage of denial. It happens, you have to deal with it. I’€™m still sour, so to speak, and without taking anything away from the Hurricanes, I believe that we were the better team and that we should’€™ve won. You can take all you want from it as far as being battle-tested, but our team has to learn to seize these opportunities. It’€™s painful. I don’€™t know when we will get over it, but we will.

Q: Why didn’€™t your team win the series?

A: I believe we were impacted a little bit by the layoff. You think about that after the series, after conducting my exit interviews with players, a lot of them brought that up. You just tend to slip over that period of time in practice. I think another part of it, maybe we underestimated them a little bit. We didn’€™t play as well in the first part of the series as we were capable of playing and we fell behind it and we couldn’€™t catch up. Look at Game 7. If we score once on a power play, we probably win that game. We were nervous on the power play. There was a lot of reasons, I think they just compiled and accumulated and helped us lose the series.

Q: How do you decide that 50 percent of one of your players is better than 100 percent of a replacement from Providence?

A: It’€™s a matter of talking with the doctors, talking with the player, seeing if there is future damage possible. Testing it out off the ice and on the ice. At the end of the day, you have to rely on what the player tells you. Chuck (Kobasew) had the ribs; he was banged up pretty good. For Phil (Kessel), he was dealing with the shoulder. It’€™s not scientific. You’€™ve got to rely on them to tell you what they can give you and see how it goes from day to day.

Q: Does it make you nervous that neither Krejci of Kessel will be available at the start of training camp?

A: A little bit, yeah it does. The fact that these guys are big contributors, we’€™ll be fine and we are getting Marco Sturm back but the proper thing is that these guys rehab it properly. You could miss a step in rehab and fall even further behind.

Q: How will those injuries impact their restricted free agency this offseason?

A: I know we will start dialogue and see where it goes. These are young players who will continue to improve and also will heal at a good clip. We have talked to them during the course of the year while they were injured about the future and I’€™m satisfied that these players will continue to grow and improve. There are a lot of ways to skin a cat here, and I think that (signing both Krejci and Kessel) is going to require some skinning. I don’t know where and I don’t know how.

Q: Is the room under the cap pretty tight for you guys?

A: It’s just going to be harder negotiations and harder choices. But I wouldn’t just focus on that. It could be a number of things that we could do. There’s going to be a crunch across the league. You see some of the things that the (Patriots) have had to do over the years and you go ‘Wow’. That may happen with us, and I know that will happen across the league. There’s going to be some of those ‘Wow’ moments and it’s the product of a cap system and a shrinking cap.

Q: Consider the possibility of bringing Mark Recchi back for next year?

A: Yes I have to consider it. He really stabilized the psyche of the team. He brought an element that we would like to have more of. The grindy goals, the tip-ins. How many net drives did he do over the course of the game? That’€™s an element that we want to improve on. I told Mark to let me sort some things out first and I would get back to him in short order to see what we can do. He was a good addition and I’€™m glad we acquired him.

Q: Have you watched Game 7 again?

A: No. I’€™ve seen that goal enough so it drives me crazy. You could hear a pin drop after they scored that goal in overtime. I wish we didn’€™t let it get to that point. Anything can happen in a Game 7. We shouldn’€™t have been in that position.

Q: Could you make a case that Walker should’€™ve been suspended for Game 7?

A: Yeah I’€™m sure you could. That was a disappointing situation and my inclination is to look at these things and rationalize them. I say my piece behind closed doors when we speak to the league and whatnot, and I was really disappointed in that result. Really disappointed that someone could be sucker-punched and not be sanctioned.

Q: What are the areas that you would like to improve on in the offseason?

A: I’€™d like to get a little more size up front. I tried to do that at the deadline and we got certain elements of that in Recchi. I’€™d still like to do that and I believe that it would help our team. You’€™d like to add a defenseman or a big forward along the way, that’€™s kind of a mini-wish list for now.

Q: How do the contracts work with accessible bonuses and things like that?

A: This year these bonuses became hard money. All those bonuses, that’€™s soft money and you can go beyond the cap on that. We have more flexibility than people think. It’€™s called the bonus cushion and you can exceed the cap with those bonuses. They’€™re soft so it gives us a little more flexibility.

Q: Which team remaining this year do you like the most?

A: I like Detroit. I told some of our guys in our exit interview to watch, they have a bunch of different types of players but they are all hard and heavy on the puck and it’€™s hard to strip them of the puck. They’€™re a smart, experienced team and I really enjoy watching them play. There’€™s no other team that plays like them.

Q: How are they able to do it consistently?

A: I think it’€™s obviously a lot of reasons why. Scouting is one. Mentality I think is the biggest reason and that is passed from player to player over time I think it kind of started in the Yzerman era. You’€™re expected to play this way whatever style you have. There’€™s a mentality, a message, and a psyche engrained in everyone. We’€™re trying to get that in the Bruins right now.

Q: I was wrong about Ryder. He really contributed well to the team all season long.

A: Yeah, he really started slow, but I really like the way that he plays. I believe that he can be a 40-goal scorer if he brings his game every night. To me, he had an average series against Carolina but it’€™s our job to get more out of him and he’€™s been a good acquisition.

Read More: David Krejci, Mark Recchi, Peter Chiarelli, phil kessil
Chiarelli named NHL Executive of the Year by Sporting News at 9:21 am ET
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Bruins General Manager Peter Chiarelli, the architect of a Boston team that went barely squeaking into the playoffs in 2007-08 to an Eastern Conference-best 116 this season, has been named Sporting News’€™ Executive of the Year by his NHL peers, a panel of 39 coaches and executives.

Chiarelli, when asked for the moves he made that had the biggest impact on the team, cited the signing of underachieving Montreal forward Michael Ryder as one.

‘€œI know it was a criticized move at the time,’€ Chiarelli said. ‘€œWe put a lot of thought into it from the perspective that it was a guy who I had seen for many years in the Northeast Division. He was a guy who had a long relationship with our coach, and he was the type of player we were looking for.’€

Ryder scored 27 goals and was a plus-28 for the Bruins. The entire NHL awards package will appear in the new Sporting News Magazine, which will be available at all Barnes & Noble, Borders and Hudson Retail outlets later this week.

The Bruins have several candidates for awards and trophies being handed out at the NHL Awards Show at the Palms Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas on June 18.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Michael Ryder, Peter Chiarelli,
Banged up Bruins talking about “unfinished business” 05.18.09 at 2:05 pm ET
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The end of an NHL season is usually rife with announcements of assorted surgeries and full disclosure of injuries previously hidden to the media through the season and the ensuing playoffs.

It’s no different for the Bruins this morning as they conducted their break-up meetings for the season and announced that David Krejci (impingement in his right hip), Phil Kessel (torn left rotator cuff and labrum in his shoulder) and Andrew Ference (torn groin, hernia) are all scheduled to go under the knife for a bevy of hockey injuries.

In addition to the surgeries, Chuck Kobasew was playing with broken ribs, Zdeno Chara had shoulder, knee and groin woes, Mark Recchi had surgery to remove kidney stones between the Games 6 and 7 and Marc Savard had a sprained knee that will require a month of rest. Despite all of that, each of those players soldiered through and for that the Spoked B skaters certainly deserve credit.

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Read More: David Krejci, Peter Chiarelli, Phil Kessel,
Bruins’ trade deadline choice partly to blame for playoff demise 05.17.09 at 12:51 pm ET
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The Bruins season is kaput after a seven-game struggle against the Carolina Hurricanes that revealed a serious flaw or two on a Black and Gold team that cruised through the 82-game campaign.

The Big Bad B’s were the best team in the Eastern Conference during the regular season, and pumped up expectations ever so higher when they dispatched the hated Montreal Canadiens with four quick, short and sweet strokes of their collective hockey sticks.

It was a magical hockey ride that spiked fan expectations and had many firmly bracing for a full Stanley Cup run in Boston’s first year back on the hockey map. But the series against the Hurricanes revealed weaknesses on the B’s roster that must be addressed going forward in the brave new world of a potentially shrinking salary cap.

This isn’t just solely about player mistakes or flaws on the ice, however.

There were also miscues made by the front office during the season that affected Boston’s playoff run, and none was bigger than Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli’s mis-step at the NHL trade deadline.

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Read More: Matt Hunwick, Peter Chiarelli, Steve Montador,
Today is a day to celebrate the greatness of Tim Thomas 04.04.09 at 12:09 pm ET
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There was a great deal of talk about persevering, unorthodox goaltending and his age — he’ll be 35 year of age in a matter of weeks — but Saturday morning was clearly the exact right moment to celebrate the classic American success story that is Tim Thomas.

The B’s goaltender was the son of a salesman growing up in hardscrabble Flint, Michigan — a guy that was never handed anything during his entire career and was taught work ethic and stick-to-itiveness by his parents. Not at the University of Vermont where he became an All-American goaltender, and not later on in the nine stops along his minor league/European odyssey that included stints in both the Finnish and Swedish Elite Leagues along with traditional minor league stops like the ECHL and the defunct Colonial Hockey League. 

It’s about a goaltender that’s fit well within the long, storied tradition of Bruins goaltenders from Tiny Thompson to Andy Moog and Pete Peeters. After recently watching the Original Six History of the Bruins DVD and being reintroduced to so many great B’s goalies from the past, it was clear that Thomas is now up in that pantheon with the rest of the Black and Gold puckstopping legends. The fact that he didn’t crack the NHL until after the age of 30 will just another part of his legendary story.

Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli admitted that he had a bit of a preconceived idea about Thomas’ ultimate ceiling in terms of talent prior to coming to Boston, but that changed when he saw the netminder’s high-wire acrobatic act between the pipes on a nightly basis. Instead of grading out a goalie that was constantly out of position and seemed to always be scrambling for a recovery, he saw an incredible athlete that could just flat out perform his No. 1 duty guarding the B’s cage: stop the puck.

“When we talk about the Tim Thomas story, we talk about perseverance over a long period of time, we talk about a long journey, and we talk about an unorthodox , hybrid style,” said Chiarelli. “But what sometimes gets lost is his uncanny ability to stop the puck. That’s why we’ve extended him.”

That second impression culminated in a four-year contract for a reported $20 million that Thomas made official on Friday, and talked about along with Chiarelli — the man that was playing point during the long negotiations – on Saturday morning prior to the Bruins/Rangers tilt.

Chiarelli admitted that Thomas’ age (he’ll turn 39 in the final days of the four-year pact) was a consideration, but that two things mitigated his status as a bit of a middle-aged goalie: there are many goalies still close to their puck-stopping primes in their mid-to-late 30′s and Thomas is relatively fresh after not entering the NHL grind until he had already crossed the 30 years-old threshold. In Chiarelli’s eyes, paying all those dues in Europe and the minors are now benefitting the “Tank.”

“I’m very happy to be staying in Boston for the next four years,” said Thomas, who is leading the NHL in Goals Against Average (GAA) of 2.11 and a save percentage of .932 and putting the finishing touches on a Vezina Trophy-worthy season. “With free agency potentially coming up this summer, you think about whether you’d rather play somewhere else or you’d rather stay in Boston. After weighing things over and over, the answer always kept coming back to ‘Boston’.

“I’m very happy that this is done, and I think I’ve done a really good job of just concentrating on hockey throughout the year, even knowing that we’ve had our talks off and on,” added Thomas, who then went out and tossed his 12th career NHL shutout against the Rangers later on Saturday afternoon. “This gives me a 100 percent chance to just focus on hockey and leave the rest of the stuff (behind).”

Chiarelli said that the team faces some difficult decisions to make over the summer when Phil Kessel, David Krejci and Matt Hunwick are all restricted free agents and P.J. Axelsson also finds his contract up. There’s a near certainty that at least one big contract will need to be moved in the summer months amid an uncertain salary cap situation, and Chiarelli didn’t shy away from that part of his managerial duties. There could be a painful trade or two coming down the line because of the salary cap situation, but that’s another story for another day.

Yesterday was about Thomas.

“This is our job,” said Chiarelli. “We have to figure out the puzzle, we have to make decisions. I’d like to sign everyone, but we have to make decisions over the summer and look at the performance of our players. Then we do the math.

“We’ve been doing the math ever since I’ve come here and that’s a large part of the job,” added the B’s decision-maker. “What is important to the organization is that we have terrific goaltending for a long time, and sometimes you have to put side the math — not completely — and make the decisions like we did with Tim.”

Thomas will continue answering all the questions that dog him when the playoffs begin in a matter of weeks, but yesterday was one of those few days when the B’s goalie could kick up his skates and have a little pride at a moment that proved he has truly arrived.

Read More: Boston Bruins, Peter Chiarelli, Tim Thomas,
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