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Shawn Thornton: ‘To get a standing ovation in a visiting arena is pretty special’ 11.05.14 at 12:32 am ET
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If ever Shawn Thornton wanted a reminder of what he meant to Bruins fans over the last seven years, he got it in a 45-second tribute in the first period Tuesday night at TD Garden.

As they did with the return of Johnny Boychuk two weeks earlier, the Bruins gave a video tribute on the large monitors above center ice midway through the first period. It featured him holding up the Stanley Cup in 2011, scoring a goal and naturally some of his better fisticuffs over his time in black and gold.

He showed his appreciation by waving his stick in the air.

“It’€™s pretty touching you know,” Thornton said. “Very, very kind, very gentle. Gentle? That’€™s not the word I was looking for. To get a standing ovation in a visiting arena is pretty special and I appreciate it. The fans have always been great to me here and again tonight. It’€™s pretty nice.”

Thornton, who signed a two-year, $2.4 million deal on July 1, played 17 shifts and spent 14 minutes on the ice as coach Gerard Gallant used his whole bench. He finished with one shot, one takeaway and four hits, but no fights.

“Well, Turk rolls four lines so I think he has had confidence in our line all year,” Thornton said. “Again tonight was another case of that. I think it’€™s nice to have two guys in Mack [Derek MacKenzie] and Kopy [Tomas Kopecky] that I’€™m playing with, it makes life a little easier for me. It’€™s nice to have the trust in us to put us out there.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Florida Panthers, Shawn Thornton, Stanley Cup
Daniel Paille suited for whatever role awaits him with Bruins 08.12.14 at 10:40 pm ET
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When the Beatles broke up, it wasn’t Paul McCartney or John Lennon who went on to make the best album outside the group (in my opinion), but rather George Harrison. Paul and John were obviously the bigger names throughout the Fab Four’s tenure, but Harrison, who had come an extremely long way as a guitarist and songwriter over the years, was primed for success.

Think of the breakup of the Merlot Line as being similar. Shawn Thornton is the biggest name (he’s in the movies, you know) and Gregory Campbell is known across the continent for killing a penalty on a broken leg, but Daniel Paille seems destined to have the strongest post-Merlot career.

Why? Because the opportunity is now there. If the Bruins embrace the trend of speedier and more skilled fourth line, Paille can handle it. If they want to move him up to the third line, he should be able to hang with the increased competition.

Paille, a former first-round pick of the Sabres who found his nitch in the NHL as a fourth-liner and penalty killer with the Bruins, possesses the speed that would allow him to fit on a quicker fourth line. Though there’€™s probably a shorthanded breakaway on which he didn’€™t score for every goal he’€™s scored in his career, Paille might remain a solid fit on the fourth line as it moves away from grit to skill. Ryan Spooner could take over as the line’€™s center, as the team is entertaining the idea of moving Campbell to the wing.

“The game is changing where there is a lot of skill on fourth lines,”€ Paille said this week. “€œGuys that used to be top-two line guys end up being fourth line when you look at [Brad] Richards and [Daniel] Briere. It’€™s becoming more of a challenge to play against. In my role, being fourth line typically, I have to be that much better.”

Of course, that’€™s not the only path Paille might take this season. With Loui Eriksson set to move up from the third line to the first line, Paille, who played left wing on the Merlot Line with Campbell and Thornton, is one of the candidates who figure to compete for the vacant third line right wing spot.

Paille figures to compete with a group of young wingers for that job. With the exception of Craig Cunningham and 2014 first-round pick David Pastrnak, all of those players – Matt Fraser, Spooner, Alexander Khokhlachev, Justin Florek ‘€” are left shots.

Should he be moved up to play on Carl Soderberg’€™s line, Paille is confident he’€™d be able to handle more minutes and tougher competition.

“I know my role here on the team, and I have no complaints playing on the fourth line,”€ Paille said. “€If I get to play that third line role, no complaints there either. I’€™m going to try to live up to the challenge if I’€™m able to do that, but if not, I’€™m going to keep working the way I need to and be prepared for the team.”

Read More: Daniel Paille, Gregory Campbell, Shawn Thornton,
Shawn Thornton embracing next chapter with Panthers 08.11.14 at 6:15 pm ET
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MIDDLETON — Everyone knows Shawn Thornton wanted to remain a Bruin. Now that he’€™s had a couple months to accept that he won’€™t be, the veteran fighter is embracing his status as a Florida Panther.

“It’€™s exciting. It is,”€ Thornton said Monday at his annual Putts and Punches for Parkinson’€™s golf tournament. “€œI’€™m probably past the point of being down a little bit about not coming back. I can’€™t wait to get down there and get settled and start the next chapter.”€

Thornton said it’€™s been a busy summer of going back and forth between his home in Charlestown and Florida, where he’€™s been house-hunting and slowly getting settled in. His show of support Monday from current Bruins Tuukka Rask, Loui Eriksson, Gregory Campbell and Daniel Paille shows that he certainly hasn’€™t been forgotten up here, and that he’€™ll keep his Boston friendships as he becomes a divisional opponent.

“Tuukka didn’€™t buy me out of my half of [our] boat, so I think we’€™re still friends,”€ Thornton joked.

Thornton made the playoffs in each of his seven seasons with the Bruins. That’€™s hardly a guarantee for him with the Panthers, who have reached the playoffs just once over the last 13 seasons (2011-12).

Amongst other moves this summer, general manager Dale Tallon (who knew Thornton from their Chicago days) brought in Thornton on a two-year, $2.4 million contract, which is the richest of the 37-year-old fighter’€™s career. The Panthers also shored up their goaltending last season by trading for Roberto Luongo. On the first day of free agency, Tallon brought in a group of veteran forwards that included Thornton, Dave Bolland and Jussi Jokinen.

How those signings help a young Panthers team remains to be seen, but Thornton hopes that between the veterans brought in and the young group already there (Erik Gudbranson, Aleksander Barkov and 2014 first overall pick Aaron Ekblad among them) the team will be able to get back to the postseason.

“I know they’€™re expecting big things from talking to them,” Thornton said of his new team. “Hopefully we deliver. I’€™d like to make the playoffs. Obviously I’€™m not a big fan of losing. I think they brought in some really good character guys. I think with their youth, they’€™re going in the right direction and I think they’€™re definitely improving. I’€™m hoping I can be a part of that.”

As for mentoring that young group of players in Florida, Thornton noted that Father Time has made that role pretty apparent.

“I’€™m going into my 17th or 18th year [Editor’s note: 18th],” Thornton said with a smirk. “I don’€™t think anyone really needs to tell me to be an older guy in the room. I am whether I want to be or not.”

Thornton’s first game back in Boston will be on Nov. 4. Interestingly enough, it will be Thornton’s first time playing in Boston as an opponent despite having parts of four NHL seasons under his belt out west before coming to the Bruins.

“It will be weird,” he admitted. “I never played a game in the Garden until I had the Bruins jersey, so every game I’€™ve played in there [I’€™ve had] the spoked B, so it will be different. It will be weird. Maybe I’€™ll pull a groin or something.”

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Shawn Thornton signs with Panthers 07.01.14 at 1:26 pm ET
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Shawn Thornton has signed with the Panthers after spending the last seven seasons in Boston. According to Elliotte Friedman of Hockey Night in Canada, the contract is for two years and is worth $2.4 million.

Thornton, now 36, served as a fourth-line fixture for the Bruins after signing with them in 2007. He posted career highs with 10 goals and 10 assists for 22 points in the Bruins’€™ Stanley Cup-winning 2010-11 season.

Last season proved to be a tough one for Thornton, as his line struggled and he was given a 15-game suspension for an on-ice incident with then-Penguins defenseman Brooks Orpik. Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli informed Thornton last month that the team would not be re-signing him.

Thornton, who hails from Oshawa, Ontario, has long said he will continue to live in Boston, where he has become known for his multiple charitable efforts.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

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Shawn Thornton on D&C: ‘I’m very, very fortunate that I got to be here for 7 years’ 06.17.14 at 11:44 am ET
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Former Bruins forward Shawn Thornton joined Dennis & Callahan on Tuesday to discuss the end of his time in Boston. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

Thornton, who will hit free agency this offseason, was informed by Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli Monday that the team will not pursue re-signing him after seven seasons in Boston.

“I’ve been around a long time. I assumed it would’ve been [Chiarelli] talking to my agent Monday afternoon instead of me walking in there,” Thornton said. “There’€™s always a chance of me walking in there to see if I’€™d be a good soldier, be the extra guy for the next year or two. But I pretty much knew it was coming.

“I talked about it on Sunday with some friends and family. I got the text on Saturday saying he wanted to meet Monday. I kind of put my head around it.”

Thornton wouldn’t cite specific reasons given by Chiarelli for his decision, but the enforcer was grateful for the opportunities given to him over the years.

“It’€™s just the business. I said it yesterday, I did a few interviews, I’€™m very, very fortunate that I got to be here for seven years,” Thornton said. “It doesn’t happen anymore. Guys don’€™t stay around in one market, being a fourth-line guy and being a tough guy. I think you get moved around a lot more than that nowadays. So to do it in this city for seven years, I’€™m really fortunate.

“€I think there are guys in Providence who are just ready to play, and you got to see a few of them do it last year. They’ve got to make some room for these guys. I could understand that.

“€œBut [Chiarelli] didn’t have to tell me early. He didn’t have to tell me face to face. Everything about this organization from Day 1 until yesterday was first class, and I appreciate it.”

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Read More: Dennis & Callahan, Shawn Thornton,
Shawn Thornton sad to leave, grateful for time with Bruins 06.16.14 at 7:27 pm ET
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Shawn Thornton is holding no grudges after Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli told him Monday that the team would not be offering him a contract for next season.

Reflecting on his seven-year tenure with the Bruins, Thornton was more proud than anything else as he began to look ahead to the next and perhaps final stop of his NHL career.

“I was very lucky and very fortunate to be part of this city and organization for the last seven years,”€ Thornton said. “€œMy first thought is I’€™m very appreciative of them keeping me around for seven years and [letting me] have the role that I’€™ve played here.

“They’€™ve been first-class from Day 1, when Cam [Neely] called me convincing me that this would be a good fit for me, to even today, Peter giving me a face-to-face meeting and a heads up before free agency that I wasn’€™t coming back. Everything in between was amazing. I’€™m very lucky and very thankful that I got treated so well when I was here.”

Thornton said he estimated his chances of being brought back as a ‘€œcoin flip’€ when Chiarelli told him at breakup day last month that he needed time to determine the team’€™s plan. The 36-year-old (he’€™ll be 37 next month) wants to play at least another season, and he’€™ll meet with teams to determine the best fit going forward.

Physically, Thornton said he feels better now than he did going into the season, as he dealt with some injuries that hindered his workouts last offseason.

As for the notion that the league is trending away from players like him, Thornton acknowledged that the Bruins have young forwards who are NHL-ready, but also said that fighting is far from extinct in the NHL.

“Obviously the league is trending away from it. You can tell. There’€™s no secret,” Thornton said. “It started when they put visors in and it’€™s just continuing on, but I think we’€™re all in agreement that the puck’€™s not going to drop next year on Oct. 7 and everyone’€™s going to be skating around with their gloves on all the time.

“I think it’€™ll probably start to be phased out eventually, but it’€™s around for the next couple of years at least. I see the point that’€™s being made, but I think it will still be here. On the other side, I think that one of the reasons I’€™ve had success and have been able to stick around as long as I have is that I bring more to the table than just the fighting. I think I can actually play hockey, too.”

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Bruins report card: Forwards 06.10.14 at 4:15 pm ET
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As the Stanley Cup finals take place, the fact that the Bruins didn’t even reach the Eastern Conference finals after winning the Presidents’€™ Trophy further accentuates the failure that was their 2013-14 season. Here are the individual grades:

FORWARDS

Patrice Bergeron: A
Regular season: 80 GP, 30 G, 32 A, 62 PTS, plus-38
Postseason: 12 GP, 3 G, 6 A, 9 PTS, plus-1

Bergeron had the type of season that led Twitter to be insufferable over his candidacy for a video game cover, so that’€™s a good thing, I guess. This was Bergeron’€™s second career 30-goal season, and the fact that he scored 30 goals given that he never, ever cheats offensively, was pretty insane. He likely would have had more points than his 62 points had his linemates been more consistent early on.

Bergeron had nine points (three goals, six assists) over the first eight games of the playoffs, but he failed to register a point in the last four games against the Canadiens.

Jarome Iginla: A-
Regular season: 78 GP, 30 G, 31 A, 61 PTS, plus-34
Postseason: 12 GP, 5 G, 2 A, 7 PTS, even rating
UNRESTRICTED FREE AGENT

He hit 30 goals in the regular season, and while that thrilled Bruins fans, that’€™s what they should have expected from him. It took him a bit to start scoring regularly, but once he hit his stride, the Bruins’€™ first line had perhaps its most consistent regular season since David Krejci became the team’€™s No. 1 center. The Bruins will want to bring him back, but there’€™s no telling whether Iginla is willing to go year-to-year given that it’€™s the only way the Bruins can capitalize cap-wise on his status as a player over 35 years old.

Carl Soderberg: A-
Regular season: 73 GP, 16 G, 32 A, 48 P, plus-4
Postseason: 12 GP, 1 G, 5 A, 6 PTS, plus-4

It’€™s probably too early take positives from the season and apply them going forward, but Soderberg showed he can be one of the league’€™s better third-liners since he was moved to center. Considering Bergeron and David Krejci aren’t going anywhere, that’s where Soderberg will remain. He has one year left on his deal with a $1.083 million cap hit. If the 28-year-old takes another step forward in his second full NHL season, he’ll be due a sizable raise.

Reilly Smith: A-
Regular season: 82 GP, 20 G, 31 A, 51 PTS, plus-28
Postseason: 12 GP, 4 G, 1 A, 5 PTS, plus-5
RESTRICTED FREE AGENT

Don’€™t confuse his midseason slump with a complete collapse; Smith was one of the Bruins’€™ best players in the postseason. With even a little consistency down the stretch in the regular season, this would be an A+.

The Bruins coveted Smith when it came time to talk trade with the Stars, and they planned on him being a steady third-liner for them this season, but he claimed the second-line right wing job and raced out to a team-leading 18 goals in his first 52 games. Of course, scoring just two goals over the final 30 games wasn’t exactly top-six material. How much of that can be attributed to his midseason illness that caused him to lose weight is unknown, but with more consistency Smith can expect to push for 30 goals going forward.

Milan Lucic: B-
Regular season: 80 GP, 24 G, 35 A, 59 PTS, plus-30
Postseason: 12 GP, 4 G, 3 A, 7 PTS, plus-3

Lucic hit a goal-scoring rut in the middle of the season and he hit some of his opponents in the you-know-whats late in the season. That scoring slump saw Lucic score one goal over an 18-game stretch from Dec. 5 to Jan. 14, and without such a stretch Lucic could have pushed for 30 goals.

Daniel Paille: B-/C+
Regular season: 72 GP, 9 G, 9 A, 18 PTS, plus-9
Postseason: 7 GP, 1 G, 0 A, 1 PT, minus-1

He had three concussions this season, but he still played in 72 regular-season games. Paille’s the type of player who could figure to stick around if the Bruins decide to revamp their fourth line, as he has the speed that’€™s allowed the B’s to move him up in the lineup at points in addition to his penalty-killing duties.

Gregory Campbell: C
Regular season: 82 GP, 8 G, 13 S, 21 PTS, plus-1
Postseason: 12 GP, 0 G, 0 A, 0 PTS, even rating

The Bruins’ bottom-six –€“ particularly their fourth line — is supposed to be better than that of other teams, and it was a bad year for the Merlot Line. Campbell was a minus-3 in the Montreal series, with his line on the ice for the disastrous shift against Montreal’s fourth line in Game 7 that resulted in Dale Weise‘s first-period goal. The positive is that Campbell played all 82 games and 12 postseason games coming off a broken leg that ended last season in the Eastern Conference finals for him.  Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Brad Marchand, Jarome Iginla, Shawn Thornton,
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