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Game 1 postgame notes: Bruins 3, Penguins 0 06.01.13 at 11:14 pm ET
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Tuukka Rask stared down the Penguins Saturday night and made 29 saves for his first career playoff shutout. (AP)

The Bruins got off to a strong start in the Eastern Conference finals by shutting out one of the most prolific offenses in recent Stanley Cup history with a 3-0 win over the Penguins Saturday night at Consol Energy Center. Here, thanks to the Bruins media relations department, are some postgame notes.

• The Bruins now have a 48-45 lifetime record in Game 1s of best-of-seven series.

• They are 33-14 lifetime when leading a best-of-seven series 1-0 and they are 29-17-1 lifetime in Game 2s when leading a best-of-seven series 1-0.

• The Penguins now have a 23-25 lifetime record in Game 1s of best-of-seven series.

• They are 12-12 lifetime when trailing a best-of-seven series 0-1 and they are 13-11 lifetime in Game 2s when trailing a best-of-seven series 0-1.

• In the previous four series between these teams, each team won the first game twice and both teams were 1-1 in the series in which they won the first game.

RASK SHUTOUT

Tuukka Rask made 29 saves for his first career playoff shutout.

• It was the 43rd playoff shutout by a Bruins goaltender and the first since Tim Thomas earned a 1-0 overtime win over Washington on April 12, 2012.

• It was the 17th time the Penguins have been shut out in a playoff game and the first since Tampa Bay’s Dwayne Roloson earned a 1-0 win on April 27, 2011.

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Pittsburgh Penguins, Stanley Cup Playoffs,
Andrew Ference: ‘It’s a matter of trainers and coaches figuring out’ return 05.31.13 at 2:21 pm ET
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Andrew Ference has been preparing to return to the Bruins lineup if cleared. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

WILMINGTON — Andrew Ference is close to playing. How close? Well, that depends on whom you ask and when.

Ference, himself, said that he’s had a very good and productive week of practice as he comes off a left foot injury that sidelined him for the last two games of the first round series against Toronto and all five games against the Rangers.

“I’ve had some really good practices. I think it’s a matter of trainers and coaches figuring out that,” Ference said after Friday’s practice. “The only thing I can do is skate and do what I have to do to make myself ready. But, at a certain point, it’s in other people’s hands as well.”

“We’re certainly not going to tip our hands,” Julien said when asked about possible maneuvering with defensive pairings. “If Ference is cleared, we have to consider that.”

Ference was skating for a fourth straight day with Aaron Johnson. As it stands now, Zdeno Chara and Johnny Boychuk would start the series as the top D pair, followed by Dennis Seidenberg and Matt Bartkowski and then Adam McQuaid and Torey Krug. Given Krug’s firepower on the power play, Bartkowski figures to be the odd man out when Ference is cleared.

“I feel good. I feel good,” Ference repeated moments later. “Good practices. I was able to take part in everything. It was nice to be at full speed with the guys. Feeling great. I think everybody is excited to get going here. We’ve done a lot of watching of the other series over the last few days. [Good to] get back to the real deal.”

The other major theme regarding Ference is his return to Pittsburgh. The Bruins are playing the Penguins in the playoffs for the first time since Ference began his career in Pittsburgh in the 1999-2000 season, after being an eighth-round pick in 1997.

“As far as going back to Pittsburgh, I’m actually surprised this is the first time our teams have met up in the past few years. Obviously, we’ve both had success. Should be great hockey. Obviously, good for the game to have those good, big markets left over here,” Ference said.

Ference broke in on a team that included Jaromir Jagr, Martin Straka, Mario Lemieux, Kevin Stevens and Alexei Kovalev. That team made it to the Eastern Conference finals in 2001 before bowing out to the Devils in five games.

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Read More: Andrew Ference, Boston Bruins, Pittsburgh Penguins, Stanley Cup Playoffs
Bruins Friday practice notes: David Krejci returns, all accounted for at 11:05 am ET
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Milan Lucic fires a shot on Tuukka Rask during Bruins practice Friday in Wilmington. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

WILMINGTON — David Krejci returned Friday morning from his “minimal maintenance” day on Thursday, as Claude Julien termed it. The Bruins skated for just about an hour before packing up at Ristuccia Arena and leaving immediately for Pittsburgh and Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals Saturday night at the Consol Energy Center. All Bruins were on the ice and accounted for as the team worked out in Wilmington for a fourth straight day.

After working almost exclusively on power-play and penalty-kill drills on Thursday, the Bruins returned to a more conventional practice on Friday.

The lines remained the same, but of note on the defensive pairing side, Zdeno Chara was paired with Johnny Boychuk while Dennis Seidenberg was teamed with Matt Bartkowski. Andrew Ference was still working with Aaron Johnson, an indication that Ference likely won’t be activated for Saturday’s game.

Adam McQuaid was with Torey Krug while Wade Redden was skating with Dougie Hamilton.

Another significant sign was the amount of drills in the corners as the coaching staff had the top four lines work on winning puck battles in the corners, an area that several players and Julien have said will be key if the Bruins are to have a chance of winning the series.

For more, including reports from DJ Bean in Pittsburgh, visit the Bruins team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Boston Bruins, David Krejci, Pittsburgh Penguins, Stanley Cup Playoffs
Claude Julien: Bruins relish being a part of a fabulous final four ‘it’s pretty impressive’ 05.30.13 at 5:39 pm ET
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Claude Julien was relaxed and joking after practice on Thursday. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

WILMINGTON — As the Bruins wrap up preparations for Game 1 of the Eastern finals Saturday night in Pittsburgh, they are taking a very brief moment to relish what it’s like to be part of a little recent history.

The quartet of the Bruins, Penguins, Blackhawks and Kings isn’t just a made-for-TV dream for NBC, they represent the most successful franchises in hockey over the last four years, as measured by Stanley Cup banners.

Each team has lifted the Cup once in the previous four seasons, starting with the Penguins in 2009, the Blackhawks in 2010, the Bruins in 2011 and the newbies, the Kings, who won their first in franchise history last year.

“I think it’s pretty impressive, knowing about parity in the league and how hard it is to get back there,” Claude Julien said. “To know that somebody is going to win it twice in, at the most, four years is pretty impressive, I think. That’s what we have here. It’s an opportunity for all of us here to duplicate what we’ve wanted to duplicate here for a while.”

Tyler Seguin was a mere 19-year-old pup when the Bruins last made a deep run, as he was a rookie in 2011. But that doesn’t mean he can’t appreciate what the Bruins, Penguins, Blackhawks and Kings have all accomplished.

“It’s very cool,” Seguin said. “It’s great to be a part of it. I don’t know if that’s happened too often throughout history but it’s going to make for a great final finish. I think experience has always been huge, especially when it comes to playoffs. We have so much experience in our locker room we can face different types of adversity and I think when it comes to playoffs, teams that have experience are always going to have the edge. There’s always the underdogs or teams that surprise other teams but this year, I think it’s a little different because the last four winners are in the final four.

“I think chemistry can definitely be huge at times, especially when you’re making playoff runs of more than one in the last few years for all four of us. I think chemistry is big in those situations and experience goes a long way.”

Julien also appreciates the job his boss, GM Peter Chiarelli has done in keeping a young core together and in tact, ready to compete for a title, year-in and year-out.

“You know it becomes harder when you win,” Julien said after Thursday’s practice. “We won a couple years ago and he’s managed to keep the core and most of the players around. He’s done a great job. I’ve said it all along, to have an opportunity to coach a team that’s deep because of the players he’s provided us with. Thats’a credit to him and his group. The coach is as good as the people that surround him; that means the assistant coaches, but also means the players, and obviously management.

“That’s always been the case, it’s not something that’s new. It’s more about you have to realize what you have and we have a good group of people here, players, coaching staff, and then management. Everybody seems to be doing a good job at what they have to do and allows us the opportunity right now to be in the top four.”

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Read More: Boston Bruins, Claude Julien, Peter Chiarelli, Pittsburgh Penguins
Bruins Thursday notes: ‘Minimal maintenance’ day for David Krejci at 1:28 pm ET
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Bruins work on their power play and penalty kill Thursday in Wilmington. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

WILMINGTON — David Krejci was not on the ice on Thursday but coach Claude Julien said it wasn’t that big of a deal.

“Maintenance, minimal maintenance,” the Bruins coach said as Krejci was given the day off.

Krejci was the only player not spotted on the sheet at Ristuccia Arena as the Bruins worked at a fast pace for 20 minutes with their power play and penalty kill units.

Andrew Ference, one of the team’s leading penalty killers, was back on the ice again and was paired with Aaron Johnson on one penalty kill unit. Julien said toward the end of his media briefing after practice that Ference has not yet been medically cleared by team doctors to play in games.

“I haven’t heard from the medical staff so I’d say the answer is ‘no,’” Julien said when asked about Ference’s medical standing as the defenseman attempts to come back from a left foot injury that sidelined him since Game 5 of the first-round series against Toronto.

Tyler Seguin took Krejci’s spot on the power play with Zdeno Chara, Jaromir Jagr, Patrice Bergeron and Milan Lucic but the units were mixed and matched throughout practice as the team worked more on power play and penalty kill drills than concentrating on specific special teams combinations.

The Bruins will practice one final time on Friday morning at 10:30 at Ristuccia before taking off for Pittsburgh afterward. The Bruins play the Penguins in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals Saturday night at 8 p.m. at the Consol Energy Center.

For more, including reports from Pittsburgh from DJ Bean, visit the Bruins team page at weei.com/bruins.

Read More: Andrew Ference, Boston Bruins, David Krejci, Pittsburgh Penguins
Matt Bartkowski on going home to Pittsburgh: ‘Everyone’s calling in their favors’ for tickets 05.29.13 at 5:45 pm ET
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Matt Bartkowski is heading home for the Eastern Conference finals. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

WILMINGTON — Going home again has its drawbacks. Just ask Matt Bartkowski.

The Bruins’ 24-year-old defenseman is headed back to where it all began for him and he couldn’t be more excited. But the homecoming for the native of nearby Mt. Lebanon, Pa., does have some obligations to fill.

“The last few years it’s been close [to] playing Pittsburgh in the playoffs and now it’s finally happening,” he said after practice on Wednesday. “I’m stoked up, pumped up and ready to go, and I’m sure the rest of these guys are. Everybody’s calling in their favors, this and that and all that crap. It just pumps us up and we’re ready to go.”

The homecoming was made possible the moment the Bruins beat the Rangers in Game 5 on Saturday, less than 24 hours after the Penguins eliminated the Senators, also in five games.

“You can’t believe how many times I’ve been asked that,” Bartkowski said of being asked about heading home. “It’s going to be awesome. I can’t think of any other way of it happening. Playing a role on the team now, and it’s playoff hockey. We’ve been looking at this match up for a while, especially me. It’s going to be awesome.”

When Bartkowski was growing up, his current teammate Jaromir Jagr was helping Mario Lemieux win back-to-back Cups in 1991 and ’92. The Penguins then went through a down period in the early 2000s before Sidney Crosby was drafted in 2005. Pittsburgh, home of the Steelers and Pirates, once again had the hockey bug.

“It died down for four years or so until Crosby got drafted,” Bartkowski said. “It’s the same thing with Jagr-Lemieux era. Now it’s the Crosby-Malkin era. Every time they get big players in Pittsburgh, it seems to jump-start all the little kids playing. It’s good for the area.

“With the Pirates doing [great], what do even you say about them? It’s pretty unfortunate. Every year they have a chance at the playoffs and then they kind of blow it. Once football season is over, it’s a hockey town. And especially with the talent they have now, it’s a hockey town once football season is over.”

His coach isn’t worried about Bartkowski being overwhelmed with it all.

“No, I don’t think so,” Claude Julien said. “I think it all depends how you approach it. He seems pretty excited, he’s looking forward to it. I think at the end of the day, he knows who he’s playing for. He wants to do well for his team. The better he does, the better he looks in everybody’s eyes, whether it’s his hometown that’s rooting for the other team or whether it’s us. I don’t see an issue with that; if anything, it’s a positive, it’s exciting. You know that he’s going to be ready to play.”

What’s interesting is that, as a defenseman, his idol didn’t play for the Penguins.

“Actually, it was [Scott Stevens] on the Devils,” Bartkowski recalled. “Any chance I got to watch a Devils game, I would. I remember in ’95, they played the Penguins in the playoffs.”

Reminded that it was Stevens who carved a reputation by laying out star players of other teams, like Eric Lindros in the 2000 playoffs, Bartkowski conceded, “Yeah, I don’t think you’d get away with those hits now. We talk about that sometimes.”

When Bartkowski, who was paired Wednesday with Dennis Seidenberg, gets on the ice, he won’t be worried about the fans, tickets or his hometown. The only names he’ll be concerned with are Crosby, Evgeni Malkin, James Neal, Jarome Iginla and the roster of the Penguins.

“I don’t know if many adjustments,” Bartkowski said. “Just making sure you’re hard on the puck and playing as physical as you can in every situation that you can. Don’t get yourself out of position but be as physical as you can.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Evgeni Malkin, Jaromir Jagr, Mario Lemieux
Brad Marchand on Matt Cooke: ‘It’s not even in our minds right now’ at 5:02 pm ET
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Brad Marchand opened up about Matt Cooke Wednesday. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

WILMINGTON — The Bruins are not consumed with exacting revenge on Matt Cooke.

As Brad Marchand reminded everyone on Wednesday after practice, the stakes now are way too high to get into revenge games for a hit that happened three seasons ago.

Of course, the hit that is etched in the mind of every Bruins fan when you mention the name Matt Cooke is the blindside hit he laid on the head of Marc Savard on March 7, 2010. That hit resulted in a Grade 2 concussion. After sitting out the first round of the playoffs, Savard scored the game-winner against the Flyers in overtime in Game 1.

Savard, however, was never the same player. After suffering another concussion 10 months later, he was shut down for the season and could not participate in the run to the Cup title.

How do the Bruins deal with their emotions on Cooke?

“Well, it depends what you mean by that,” Claude Julien said. “Are you talking about the Savard thing? Or are you talking about the way Matt Cooke plays. There’s different ways of answering that. At one point, you’ve got to move on from certain things. Just like the next question will be like [Jarome] Iginla. Stuff like that. We all know about that. The thing we have to focus on is finding a way to win the series. If you just want revenge on this guy or that guy. Is it really the right focus to have? The best way to get that satisfaction is by winning a series. So I think that’s where your focus has to be.”

Asked on Wednesday what he thought of Cooke, Marchand, a rookie in 2010, agreed with his coach, adding the Bruins can’t worry about exacting some measure of personal revenge.

“He’s playing well right now,” Marchand began, before offering a bit of backhanded compliment. “If you watched the Ottawa series, he’s running around a bit but he’s doing some things offensively, too. He’s doing good things for the team. We’re not going to focus on any single guy over there. They’ve got four lines that can do damage so he’s just another guy who’s on their team.

“It’s a completely different season. We’re not worried about that at all anymore. It’s a long time ago. There’s much bigger things at stake than that hit. It’s not even in our minds right now.”

Marchand’s primary focus is to work with Patrice Bergeron to try and get linemate Jaromir Jagr into the goal-scoring column against the team he began his NHL career with.

“He’s doing a lot of good things right now, making a lot of plays,” Marchand said of Jagr. “He’s in the right spot a lot of the time. He’s getting a ton of opportunities. You really only have to start worrying when you don’t get any opportunities and that’s not the case for him. So hopefully, they’ll start going in for Jags.”

The other priority will be to keep a close eye on the Penguins’ highly potent second line of Evgeni Malkin, Jarome Iginla and James Neal. Marchand said keeping the puck in the offensive zone will be a big part of Boston’s defensive attack when those three are on the ice.

“That’s definitely a big part of playing like a line against that,” Marchand said. “They want to play in the offensive zone, and if we can find a way to keep them down in the defensive end and work it down there, it limits their opportunity to score. We want to play in their end as much as possible, but it’s not an easy thing to do with the skill and talent they have over there.”

Read More: Boston Bruins, Brad Marchand, Marc Savard, Matt Cooke
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