Big Bad Blog AT&T Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Steven Stamkos’
Bruins know Steven Stamkos injury isn’t good for anyone 11.11.13 at 5:32 pm ET
By   |  4 Comments

It should come as no surprise that when Steven Stamkos flew into the net and pounded his fist in both clear pain and disappointment in the second period of Monday’s Bruins-Lightning game, the TD Garden crowd fell silent. When he was placed onto a stretcher and wheeled off the ice, the sold-out crowd gave him a standing ovation.

Boston fans aren’t always the most gracious, but the unanimous show of support for the Lightning star said that they both respect him — remember, this is the same ice on which Stamkos took a Johnny Boychuk slapshot to the face, got some stitches, slapped a cage on his helmet and went back out there in Game 7 of the 2011 Eastern Conference finals — and don’t want to see the league lose one of its best young players.

The Bruins agreed, and though the top team in the conference losing the league’s leader in goals and points might bode well for the Bruins, it isn’t lost on them that a Stamkos-less NHL isn’t as good an NHL.

“I don’€™t care whether he’€™s on another team or not, a player like that is what people pay to come and watch,” Claude Julien said. “‘€¦ This game is built on guys like that that have tremendous skills, that are good leaders and everything else. It’€™s unfortunate that those kind of injuries happen to those players. You hope that his injury isn’€™t too serious and if anything he’€™s going to come back quick.”

Unfortunately, the injury is serious and he isn’t going to come back quick. It’s a broken right tibia for Stamkos and he’s out indefinitely. He suffered the injury crashing into the net while battling for position with Dougie Hamilton, with his left leg hitting the post first and then the bottom of his right leg following in a scene of which you probably won’t want to catch too many replays.

Gregory Campbell knows a thing or two about tough injuries like this, as he had one of the most famous broken legs in sports history when he broke his blocking an Evgeni Malkin slapshot in Game 3 of last season’s Eastern Conference finals and finished his shift.

“I don’€™t like to see that happen to anybody,” Campbell said. “I have a lot of respect for him, but whether it’€™s him or somebody else, injuries are tough, tough to come back from.

Added Campbell: “He’€™s becoming the face of the game now, one of the key faces of the NHL. In an Olympic year, a lot of things that are negative about it for his own personal game it’€™s unfortunate. Injuries do happen, it’€™s something that you have to come to expect, unfortunately. It’€™s the beginning of a long process when you get injured, and he’€™s an important player to his team and to the league, but he’€™s a strong guy. I know he works hard, and I’€™m sure he’€™ll be back stronger than ever.”

Read More: Claude Julien, Steven Stamkos,
After earning another Game 7, Lightning throw out first six games 05.27.11 at 12:38 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on After earning another Game 7, Lightning throw out first six games

The Bruins had the chance to close the Lightning out after holding a 2-1 lead after the first period in Game 6, but Tampa stormed back to grab a 5-4 win and force Friday’s Game 7. With a trip to the Stanley Cup finals on the line, Lightning players can appreciate when they did in fending off elimination in Tampa, but are done celebrating the win, or any of the series’ first six games, for that matter.

“The six games mean absolutely nothing now. We did our job. We gave ourselves a chance to play in this game by winning last game,” center Steven Stamkos, who had three points in Game 6, said Friday. “I thought we had a lot of positives, but we have to focus on some things for tonight defensively. We don’t like giving up that many goals, but the power play was going, we got some guys on the board that we need to get going.

“This is going to be an exciting challenge for us tonight. We know it’s not going to be easy, but we need everything going on the right path for us to win tonight.”

This will be Tampa’s second Game 7 of the postseason, as they trailed the Penguins, 3-1, in the first round before rattling off three wins in a row to advance to the second round. Showing the ability to stay alive is nothing knew for the Lightning, but throughout the dressing room, the team’s mindset is the same: keep the past in the past.

“We did [earn the right to play in Game 7],” defenseman Eric Brewer said after Stamkos’ comments. “That’s a good point, but at the end of the day, it’s a Game 7. Both teams recognize that the other six are gone. One team is going to play on, and one’s not, so you just really have to keep your mind in small places and not get too far ahead of yourself.”

Should the Lightning win Friday, it will be the team’s first trip to the Stanley Cup finals since they defeated the Flames for the Cup in 2004.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, 7, Eric Brewer, Steven Stamkos
Bruins can’t close out Lightning despite David Krejci hat trick 05.25.11 at 10:46 pm ET
By   |  11 Comments

TAMPA — The Bruins and Lightning are heading back to Boston to decide the Eastern Conference finals, as a hat trick from David Krejci was not enough to propel the B’s into the Stanley Cup Finals — instead, it was a 5-4 loss in Game 6 Wednesday night.

After the Bruins erased an early 1-0 Bolts lead with goals from Milan Lucic and Krejci. Tampa would come back with three unanswered goals before a back-and-forth third period left the B’s down by one following Krejci’s third goal.

Teddy Purcell did most of the Lightning’s damage to Tim Thomas, opening the scoring just 36 into the contest and giving Tampa a 3-2 lead 13:35 into the second period. Purcell now has six goals this postseason, three of which have come this round.

Thomas made 21 saves for the Bruins, while Dwayne Roloson stopped 15 of the Bruins’ 19 shots.

Game 7 will be played at TD Garden on Friday.


– Another goal allowed very early for the Bruins. Krejci was set to take the face-off against Vincent Lecavalier and was tossed from the dot, allowing Lecavalier to go against Chris Kelly. The Tampa center won it cleanly, allowing for Purcell to blast one past Thomas. It was the Lightning’s second goal in the first minute of a game this series, and third goal in the first 1:09. Amazingly, it was the only game in the aforementioned three that the Lightning won.

– Yes, Eric Furlatt was officiating and the Lightning were penalized more than the B’s, but it was Tampa that won out when it came to actually capitalizing. The Bruins’ power play looked improved with Zdeno Chara in front, and Krejci scored his second of the game with the B’s on the man advantage in the third, but the Lightning went 3-for-4 as opposed to Boston’s 1-for-5.

– Once again, the Bruins simply couldn’t build momentum at St. Pete Times Forum. After blowing a 3-0 lead in Game 4, the B’s blew a 2-1 lead in the second and got no boost from Krejci’s goal that brought them within one in the third. Martin St. Louis scored 29 seconds after Krejci’s tally.

– Taking an interference penalty with 13:02 remaining in a game in which your team is trying to make a two-goal comeback probably isn’t what you want to do if you’re Tomas Kaberle. The polarizing defenseman did just that in the corner on a play that left Ryan Malone bloodied. Kaberle actually had a good night defensively, but the penalty won’t help his reputation around Boston as a bust of an acquisition.


– Krejci’s hat trick gives him five goals in six Eastern Conference finals games. The dominance from the second round hasn’t been there, but the numbers have been.

– Say what you want about Lucic disappearing this postseason, but he always smells blood when his team has a chance of ending a series. Lucic had a pair of tallies in Game 4 against the Flyers in the second round last year, and had three goals in Games 6 and 7 combined against Philly last year. Taking Games 6 and 7 against the Habs this year into consideration, Lucic now has 6 goals in the last six games in which the Bruins could eliminate an opponent.

Dennis Seidenberg had a big play for the Bruins on a play in which the Lightning could have made it 4-2 late in the second. A Marc-Andre Bergeron shot yielded a rebound that Steven Stamkos tapped toward the net with Thomas out of position. Seidenberg literally put his foot down, stepping in front of the puck before it could hurt the B’s and starting a circus that landed Andrew Ference in the box for cross-checking Stamkos. The Lightning would score on the power play early in the second period on a goal from Stamkos, thus making the transaction a wash.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Andrew Ference, Chris Kelly, David Krejci
Bruins-Lightning Game 5 preview: Five things, stats and players 05.23.11 at 1:12 am ET
By   |  2 Comments

The Bruins learned the hard way Saturday that they need more than a strong start and a big day from Patrice Bergeron to get their third victory of the Eastern Conference finals. After blowing a 3-0 lead in Saturday’€™s Game 4, the Bruins will be back at home Monday to take on the Lightning in Game 5.


– Take advantage of playing at home/score the first goal. The Bruins don’t want to find themselves a loss away from elimination when the teams head back to Tampa for Game 6, so taking care of business in their own building will be key.

The B’€™s weren’€™t able to score the first goal in Games 1 and 2, though they were able to head to Tampa with the series tied at a game apiece. The first goal hasn’€™t been everything this series, as the team to strike first has gone 2-2 thus far.

– The B’€™s must get the type of production from David Krejci‘€™s line that made the second round such a walk in the park. Krejci was a minus-3 with zero shots on goal in Game 4, while Nathan Horton and Milan Lucic each had just one shot on goal in the loss.

– The Bruins’€™ second line probably would be a stinker as well if it weren’€™t for the redeeming qualities of Bergeron. If it weren’€™t for a Brad Marchand interference penalty in the second period, there would be minimal proof that the feisty rookie even played in Game 4. Marchand had no shots on goal for the second time this series. The B’€™s have lost both games in which the 23-year-old has failed to put a shot on net. Mark Recchi is a minus-4 this series and has just five shots on goal.

– Selective memory would probably serve the B’€™s best after their Game 4 collapse. Remember that it happened, but don’€™t think about just how much momentum the come-from-behind win could have given Tampa Bay.

– Not that they will, but the B’€™s should at least give consideration to playing Steven Kampfer. We said it last week, and Saturday’€™s soft showing behind the net on a costly turnover to Sean Bergenheim only confirms it: it’s worth seeing what Kampfer can do in place of Tomas Kaberle. Kaberle looked better in Games 2 and 3, but if you’€™re going to give him between 11 and 12 minutes a game and he still finds a way to make them costly minutes as he did Saturday, you’€™re better off easing Kampfer back in with an 11-or-12-minute night. Kampfer has as many goals this season against the Lightning (two) as Kaberle has had turnovers that resulted in Tampa goals this series.


– Kaberle’€™s 11:35 of ice time in Game 4 isn’€™t just ridiculously low for someone the team invested so much in, but it’€™s the lowest total that Kaberle ‘€“ two injury games aside — has played in his entire career. While with the Maple Leafs, he left the team’€™s March 2, 2007 game vs. the Devils after being blindsided in the second period by Cam Janssen, and he left a Jan. 6, 2004 game with a shoulder injury in the first period. Back then, injuries were all that could keep Kaberle from playing less than 12 minutes. Now, it’€™s just poor play.

– That stuff about Michael Ryder turning it on in the playoffs is true. Ryder has seven points (3 G, 4 A) in his last five games. He never amassed more than five points in any five-game stretch during the regular season, and this five-game stretch ties for Ryder’s second-best as a member of the Bruins. He had nine points over the Bruins’ first five games of the 2009 playoffs.

Tim Thomas has allowed four goals four times this postseason, and the Bruins are 3-0 thus far in games that directly followed said performances. Thomas allowed one goal in 89 minutes in Game 5 of the first round after allowing four goals two nights earlier. He followed the team’€™s 5-2 loss in the conference finals opener by allowing five in Game 2, but the B’€™s came away with the win. It was after that contest that Thomas really bounced back, blanking the Lightning in Game 3.

– Neither the Bruins nor the Lightning have scored a power play goal since Game 2 of the series. This marks the first time this postseason that the Bruins and their opponent have put up a goose-egg on the man advantage in consecutive games.

Steven Stamkos is a minus-2 this series, and has only had a positive rating in one game this postseason. The lone positive rating came in Game 5 of the quarterfinals when he had two goals, an assist and was a plus-1.


– Whichever Lightning goalie starts. Dwayne Roloson has been chased from two of the series’€™ first four games, and Guy Boucher has yet to reveal whether Roloson will be a go for Game 5. If Boucher makes a change, it will be Mike Smith, who has stopped all 20 shots he’€™s seen from the B’€™s in 60:51 this series.

Simon Gagne: The veteran winger simply slays the Bruins, and he did it to the tune of three points and a plus-4 rating in Game 4.

– Ryder and Tyler Seguin: In the event that Lucic and Horton fail to step it up and Bergeron’€™s wingers continue to struggle, the B’€™s will need the magical Ryder/Seguin duo to light it up the way they did in Game 2. Seguin was on the ice for three of the Lightning’€™s five goals Saturday, but he’€™s been second to only Ryder this series as far as who the B’€™s best winger has been.

Dennis Seidenberg: One last opportunity to point out that the B’€™s minute-eating defenseman had seven blocked shots in Game 4. He and Kaberle were out there for Gagne’s game-winner.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brad Marchand, David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg
Lightning trying to ‘stop’ Tyler Seguin, Claude Julien wishes they’d stop ‘flattering’ Bruins 05.19.11 at 1:31 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment

TAMPA — Nobody — even the biggest “play Seguin at all costs” crybabies — could have expected what Tyler Seguin has done in the Eastern Conference finals.

Since making his playoff debut in Game 1 of the conference finals, Seguin has had six points (3 G, 3 A) and has gone from an injury replacement to a big problem for the Lightning in a matter of six periods.

‘€œThe first two games, it’s clear the players and everybody underestimated his speed,” Tampa coach Guy Boucher said of Seguin. “That’€™s the main thing. His speed is obviously a weapon for him and his team. Being a young guy and having success right away, it certainly takes a lot of the nervousness away, and for us we know he’€™s going to be on the ice and we have to be able to keep up with his speed.’€

The praise from the Lightning wasn’t limited to Boucher, as one player who knows Seguin’s style better than most said the team needs to find a way to prevent the rookie from taking over another game like he did in Game 2 (2 G, 2 A). Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Steven Stamkos, Tyler Seguin
Don’t expect more ‘pond hockey’ between Bruins and Lightning for Game 3 at 1:19 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Don’t expect more ‘pond hockey’ between Bruins and Lightning for Game 3



TAMPA — Steven Stamkos may only be 21 years old but he certainly can articulate like a crafty and well-versed veteran in the ways of winning playoff hockey.

He also proved Thursday morning in the hours before Game 3 at St. Pete Times Forum that he was playing close attention to what his coach was preaching and teaching during film analysis of the Game 2 loss to the Bruins Tuesday night at TD Garden.

After the game Tuesday, Guy Boucher spoke of how his team got into pond hockey and lost the race. He told his players in film study that he didn’t want that to happen again, even if it means giving up some scoring chances that came from desperate hockey in the third period.

“I don’t think for us there is a fine line,” Stamkos said. “I think that line doesn’t exist. We don’t want to play that run-and-gun pond hockey. That’s not our structure. That’s not how we’ve won games this year. At the end of the day, we had a lot of scoring chances, probably moreso that any other game we’ve played, maybe all year, but we didn’t win the game. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Martin St. Louis, Michael Ryder
Lightning coach Guy Boucher: Tim Thomas is in ‘everybody’s head’ 05.13.11 at 8:49 pm ET
By   |  1 Comment



Tim Thomas dominated the Tampa Bay Lightning during the regular season much in the same way he dominated the rest of the NHL. So, maybe nobody should’ve been shocked when their head coach admitted Friday that the Bruins goalie is in their heads.

Thomas was a perfect 3-0-0 this season against the Lightning, with 1.67 goal against, allowing just five goals in the three games.

“Well, I’m sure we’re no different than any other team or any other coaches,” Tampa Bay coach Guy Boucher said Friday. “We do study the other goaltender. I’m sure they studied ours. There’s tendencies and things you want to focus on.

“But I think the players play the game, everything is done in fractions of seconds. It’s quite difficult to all of a sudden change their ways. We do want to focus on a few things. But the reality is, whatever we plan against Tim Thomas, he’s probably going to find a way to counter that. I think you want to watch out and not focus too much on the other team’s goaltender.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Boston Bruins, Martin St. Louis, NHL
Bruins Box Score
Bruins Schedule

Latest from Bleacher Report

Bruins Headlines
NHL Headlines