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Peter Chiarelli explains why he decided to extend Torey Krug, Reilly Smith: ‘Gives us comfort’ 03.07.15 at 1:06 am ET
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For about 10 minutes Friday, after the team practice on TD Garden ice, Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli attempted to explain why he committed nearly $11 million of salary and cap space for Torey Krug and Reilly Smith.

“Torey on one year at 3.4 million, Reilly three years at 3.425 [million],” Chiarelli said. “Obviously there’€™s the contract in the past – beginning of the year. These are players we always liked and have a bright future for us. Term was important. It’€™s shorter term and gives us more flexibility and it gives them more flexibility as far as performing on a short term platform and becoming more of a fixture of us going forward.

“The one and two year terms were important to us. These were deals that came about, the ideas and the philosophies came out a little bit more after we signed the one year deals. Later in the winter and early spring we started’€”not spring but January and February we talked more. They worked very hard to bring together and these are two good, young players and two good young people.”

And they’re good people who won’t have to endure the frustration of sitting out of camp this summer because the team didn’t have enough cap space to sign them to contracts. Both Krug and Smith recalled Friday that uncomfortable feeling. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, NHL, Peter Chiarelli, Reilly Smith
Reilly Smith has some job security for now: ‘Hopefully I can stay with this organization a while’ 03.06.15 at 10:20 pm ET
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After the obvious of getting a big pay raise, the best part of the two-year contract extension for Reilly Smith might be job security.

The Bruins right wing, like teammate Torey Krug, had to sit out the start of camp last summer because the Bruins were over the cap temporarily and couldn’t afford to sign them to new contracts until there was some roster manipulation and flexibility.

But there won’t be such worries this summer or the next as Smith agreed to a two-year extension through the 2016-17 season worth $3.425 million each season.

“It seems like through this whole thing, it’s always been me and Torey slotted together in this whole negotiation process,” Smith said. “It’s good and bad. It’s nice having someone with you through the whole negotiation process, especially in the summer when you’re sitting out camp when neither of us wanted to be. But it’s just good to have it behind us.”

Krug’s deal is worth $3.4 million, but is only good through next season. Still, having the piece of mind knowing that he’ll be in camp next summer is worth it to Smith.

“It was definitely tough. It was on my mind for a while,” Smith said. “It was a pretty stressful time in the summer, having to sit out camp for a while. I’m glad I don’t have to do that the next couple of years.”

The 23-year-old Smith was part of the package from Dallas along with Loui Eriksson, Joe Morrow and Matt Fraser for Tyler Seguin, Rich Peverley and Ryan Button before the 2013-14 season.

Smith, who has struggle to finish scoring chances all season like the rest of his teammates, doesn’t mind the pressure that comes with expectations. Smith, still only 23, has just 12 goals in 63 games this season. General manager Peter Chiarelli, during a Friday press conference to announce the signings, admitted Smith is being paid like a 20-goal scorer.

“I think I welcome it,” Smith said of the pressure factor. “There’s probably a little bit more pressure but as a hockey player and playing in this organization and at this level, you welcome that every day because people get better every day and just being able to cope with challenges and changes in this league, I think it’s something every player in this league dreams to be able to do. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Boston Bruins, Reilly Smith, Torey Krug,
Torey Krug knows Brett Connolly’s return from broken finger will last longer than missed games 03.05.15 at 11:57 am ET
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Torey Krug

Torey Krug

The six-week period that the Bruins will be without Brett Connolly is step one of an undesirable two-step process through which the team will have to work. After that comes the other hard part.

No injuries are easy to return from, but it can take a long time for a player returning from a finger injury to feel right. The fact that Connolly will go through the re-acclimation process in the postseason is far from optimal.

“It sucks,” Torey Krug said Thursday, and he would know.

Krug suffered a broken left pinky finger suffered on a slash from Zach Parise Oct. 28.

Though he returned after four games out of the lineup, his time getting comfortable again far eclipsed the length of period he stayed out of game action. A player whose bread and butter is his slap shot, Krug was limited to wrist shots and landed three shots on goal in just one of his first 11 games back. He had only one point — a goal — in that span.

“For me, I was always thinking about my finger and wondering how it was going to feel,” Krug said of his return from the injury. “When I had the puck, I was wondering if somebody was going to try and slash my hand again, so it was just a lot of thinking. It took me a while to get to the point where I didn’€™t have to think about it anymore.”

How long? About two months, by Krug’€™s estimation. He’€™s now playing with a new glove he received that has an extra-thick block of padding around the left pinky, which gives Krug peace of mind more than anything.

The slap shot issue won’€™t be a major problem for Connolly given that he’€™s a forward and doesn’t need to take many slappers, but Krug feels bad that Connolly’€™s first games with the Bruins will be spent trying to forget about an injury.

“He’€™s looking for a fresh start and was very excited about the opportunity that he had here to have that,” Krug said. “We were equally excited to have him. Being a forward in that position, you’€™re playing with the puck maybe a little bit more and you’€™re shooting the puck and you’€™ve got to handle it quicker. I can definitely feel for him, for sure.”

Connolly, who will undergo surgery on his right index finger, becomes just another name on a lengthy list of Bruins who have missed stretches of time due to injury this season. He joins Krug, David Krejci, Zdeno Chara, Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller and Gregory Campbell.

“I know it’€™s happened a lot this year, but it’€™s just of how things have gone,” Krug said with a laugh, almost in disbelief. “We were very excited about what he could bring to the team, but now we can’€™t sit here and dwell on it. We have guys in this room that are capable of stepping up and filling voids, and they’€™re going to do that.”

Read More: Brett Connolly, Torey Krug,
Torey Krug, Brad Marchand get in dustup during Bruins practice 01.06.15 at 1:19 pm ET
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Torey Krug and Brad Marchand got into a tussle during battle drills in Tuesday’€™s practice. The two had to be separated after some netront battling escalated. Shortly after, the two led the team’€™s stretch together.

The dustup was the second the Bruins have had during a practice this season, as Claude Julien had to separate Tuukka Rask and Carl Soderberg on Nov. 24 during a morning skate.

“€œI don’€™t think it’€™s a big issue,”€ Julien said of Tuesday’€™s fracas.

Marchand and Krug both said they were fine with each other after the practice, with Marchand saying it was a result of him telling Krug’€™s “brother’€™s fiance’s friend” that he was taller than Krug. So there’€™s that.

“€œIt shows emotion, and right now that’€™s one thing we need, is to show a little more emotion,” Marchand said. “€œThat’€™s what we need. Obviously you don’€™t want to be going at each other in practice, but sometimes things happen and hopefully that all carries over into the game.”

Read More: Brad Marchand, Torey Krug,
Injuries mean jobs: Bruins’ young defensemen should seize moment like those before them 11.20.14 at 3:14 pm ET
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Joseph Morrow

Joe Morrow

Peter Chiarelli will probably never say how many NHL defensemen he thinks he has again.

Since saying that he felt he had nine this offseason, the number has been tested significantly. After trading one of them in Johnny Boychuk, Chiarelli has seen five of his defensemen get hurt in the first 20 games of the season. Of the nine NHL-caliber defensemen Chiarelli said he felt the Bruins possessed, the only three who haven’€™t suffered an injury this season have been Dennis Seidenberg, Dougie Hamilton and Matt Bartkowski.

That is rough, rough stuff for the Bruins, but it does allow that list of NHL defensemen to get longer. Games played as injury replacements have been the avenue to the NHL for many of Boston’€™s young defensemen, with Hamilton really the only one who was actually given a job to begin his NHL career.

Adam McQuaid filled in for an injured Mark Stuart and took his job in 2011. Torey Krug and Matt Bartkowski earned their sweaters in the 2013 postseason. Kevan Miller and Zach Trotman got their feet wet a season ago with injuries to various blueliners, while Joe Morrow initially came up to replace the struggling Bartkowski this season but will remain in the lineup in part because of Boston’€™s ailing back end.

Krug thinks that’€™s a respectable way to become an NHL player. He feels jumping in to replace a hurt player leaves less room for thinking, which is a good way to avoid mistakes for a young player.

“It doesn’€™t leave you time to think about what could happen or what could go wrong, because you’€™re the only option,”€ he said. “€œThey’€™re putting you in the game and you’€™ve just got to go out and do your thing. All the guys that have gone out and done so so far have taken the right mindset.

“€œThat’€™s the only reason I’€™m here right now, is because there was an opportunity with a couple guys hurt in the playoffs, and I [made] the best of it. I think these guys are doing a good job of taking these opportunities and running with it. It’€™s fun when you earn things like that.”

McQuaid had gotten off to a very encouraging start to this season coming off an injury-plagued 2013-14 campaign that saw him dress in only 30 games. With a broken thumb putting his season on hold for 6-8 weeks, the Bruins have to go back to their group of young defensemen for bigger and tougher minutes.

That won’€™t be easy, but given the job that Miller did replacing him last season and the play they’€™ve gotten from other young blueliners, the Bruins are confident they can handle the loss.

“€œIs it a silver lining? It is in a way because we really felt we had some good depth on the back end,”€ Claude Julien said. “I think it’€™s showing now. Whoever we bring up seems to be doing a decent job. A lot of guys that are here now are going to make it difficult for us when it’€™s all said and done. There’€™s a pretty good competition going again on our back end.”

Morrow, a 2011 first-round pick, has proven to be a better NHL player than he was an AHL player. Trotman, meanwhile, was replaced by Bartkowski on Saturday and eventually sent to Providence, but now he’€™s back with the NHL club. Neither player was on Chiarelli’€™s unofficial list of nine this summer, but they can add their names to it with strong performances.

Given their injuries, the Bruins’€™ list of NHL-caliber defensemen isn’€™t anything like what it was in the offseason, but as players return to the lineup, the B’€™s could eventually find themselves at a point where they have more guys capable of handling NHL minutes than they did immediately after trading Boychuk.

“I think that number’€™s grown,”€ Krug said. “€œYou’€™re witnessing Joe come in and do a great job, and Trots is getting the experience and he’€™s doing well. I think that number’€™s getting higher and higher. Hopefully at some point, we have that many guys that the coaching staff has to make a decision who to play.”

Read More: Joe Morrow, Kevan Miller, Matt Bartkowski, Torey Krug
Slap shots will come as Torey Krug gets more comfortable 11.10.14 at 11:07 pm ET
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Torey Krug

Torey Krug

The Bruins are slowly but surely getting healthier on defense, as Torey Krug returned to the lineup Monday and is starting to forget all about his broken pinky finger.

While a pinky injury might sound like a minor injury, it’€™s actually quite the obstacle to overcome. Without the full use of the pinky, as Zdeno Chara explained months ago, one can’€™t grip things. Without being able to grip things, one can’€™t take a slap shot. Without a slap shot, an NHL defenseman –” especially one of the better offensive ones –€” isn’€™t quite himself.

So while Krug took his usual spot at the point of the Bruins’€™ top power play unit, it wasn’€™t a night full of blasts to the net just yet. He took five shots on the night, only one of which was a slap shot. The lone shot he landed on net was a wrist shot.

Krug had two full practices with the B’€™s before returning to game action. He admitted that as he worked his way back from the injury, trying to shoot presented issues for him.

“I definitely had some challenges with shooting at first and the vibrations of the stick,” Krug said, “but everything’€™s good now.”

The injury was suffered on Oct. 28 on a slash from Zach Parise. Krug logged 21:16 of ice time on Monday night, saying that the toughest challenge he faced was not thinking about the injury.

“I think the last thing is just making sure I’€™m not thinking about it,” he said. “There were times in practice where I’€™m protecting myself and making sure it doesn’€™t get hit or something like that. You get into live game action and you can’€™t really think about that because otherwise the puck’€™s going to end up in your net.”

Julien said that Krug looked like someone who was playing in his first game back from an injury, but that he liked his game Monday night.

“He’€™s been out for a while, and I think he had one or maybe two practices with us and that’€™s it,” Julien said. “But he came in and did his job. Obviously he’€™s not at 100 percent with his situation, but he seems to be handling the puck well. Again, maybe he didn’€™t get that many shots on net tonight, but still I thought he was a good player.”

Read More: Torey Krug,
5 things we learned as Bruins won 5th straight: Seth Griffith scores crazy goal at 9:29 pm ET
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Seth Griffith scored another highlight-reel goal Monday. (Claus Andersen/Getty Images)

Seth Griffith scored another highlight-reel goal Monday. (Claus Andersen/Getty Images)

One goal can make a game. Seth Griffith’€™s second-period goal did just that.

With the Bruins and Devils tied at two goals apiece late in the second period, the Bruins rookie scored what is likely the most impressive goal he’€™ll score in his career when, after blocking a shot, he battled for a puck through Bryce Salvador and got tangled up with Marek Zidlicky as he raced to the net. After getting spun around, he backhanded the puck through his legs and those of Cory Schneider to give the Bruins a 3-2 lead.

Reilly Smith would score soon after, giving the Bruins two goals in the final two minutes of the second period and sending them on their way to a 4-2 victory over the Devils (Check out the game boxscore).

Griffith, who was playing in his 12th NHL game after getting called up for top-six duty last month, is becoming no stranger to sensational goals. After flying through the air Bobby Orr-style on his Oct. 28 goal against the Wild, Griffith is setting the bar pretty high for himself going forward in his young NHL career.

The win was Boston’€™s fifth in a row. It improved the B’€™s to 6-1-0 since Zdeno Chara went down, while the B’€™s have won all three games that David Krejci has missed over this recent stretch.

Here are four other things we learned Monday night:

KRUG RETURNS

Torey Krug returned to the lineup after a four-game absence caused by a broken pinky finger suffered on Oct. 28.

Krug skated on the team’€™s third defensive pairing with Zach Trotman, taking the place of the injured David Warsofsky, who is out 2-4 weeks with a groin strain. The second-year defenseman also returned to his usual spot on the point of Boston’€™s first power play unit.

Matt Bartkowski served as a healthy scratch for the fifth consecutive game.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Reilly Smith, Seth Griffith, Torey Krug,
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