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Claude Julien doesn’t appear ready to sit Tyler Seguin 06.04.11 at 4:48 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — While an argument could be made by some for Tyler Seguin to be taken out of the Bruins’ lineup, coach Claude Julien spoke like a man who wasn’t ready to take that action on Saturday.

Seguin played 6:21 in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals, and including that contest, his two lowest career time-on-ice totals have come against the Canucks. The rookie has also been held with out the point the last six games, but when asked about Shawn Thornton Saturday, Julien didn’t give off the impression that the fourth-line enforcer would be in the lineup.

“Every game is about making decisions here… We’re in a position where we have to make decisions based on our needs, what has to happen,” Julien said. “We’ve at points envisioned a guy like Tyler, the way he played [early in the Eastern Conference finals], we had to keep him in the lineup.

“As games go on, we make decisions. What I’m saying today might be different tomorrow, so on, so forth.”

Seguin exploded with six points in the first two games of the conference finals, which were his first two career playoff games. It took a Patrice Bergeron concussion suffered in Game 4 vs. the Flyers for Seguin to even get his chance to play, and he doesn’t want to go back to the press box.

“I’m taking advantage of all opportunities I’ve been given,” Seguin said. “I don’t want to go back to the feeling of almost waiting for an
injury for you to get a chance to play. That’s not the emotional state I want to be in. I’m trying to stay away from that.”

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Shawn Thornton, Stanley Cup Finals
More memorable moments from Tyler Seguin would be big for Bruins 06.03.11 at 9:16 pm ET
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VANCOUVER — Bruins rookie forward Tyler Seguin has obviously had an up-and-down rookie year. Though it’s easy to get hypnotized by his skill given his age, the learning process has not always been easy for Seguin. He was a healthy scratch for seven games in the regular season, as well as in the team’s first 11 games of the postseason. In most instances, it was warranted.

When Patrice Bergeron‘s concussion opened up a spot in the lineup, Seguin showed at points of the first three games of the Eastern Conference Finals just why having him on the ice can pay off. Seguin was flashy, smart and even more mature at the same time.

On Friday, the 19-year-old was asked at the University of British Columbia if he recalled a “welcome to the NHL” moment in his rookie campaign.

“Umm,” Seguin said as he thought about it. “I’ve heard before that people have had their one thing that [got their attention]. I had a ‘welcome to the playoffs’ moment.”

No, that moment was not on his first-period goal against the Lightning in Game 1 in which he embarrassed Michael Lundin at the blue line. The moment came before that.

“My second shift, where Tampa scored two goals on my line, that was kind of my ‘welcome to the playoffs,'” Seguin said. “It wasn’t a good welcome, but luckily on my third shift, I scored one.”

Seguin did score one, and he scored two more in the second period of Game 2. In Game 3, he executed a smart play by holding onto the puck and drawing two defenders over to him before sending the puck deep on a play that resulted in an Andrew Ference goal.

Yet since then, it’s been quiet for Seguin. Considering he didn’t get an assist on the aforementioned Ference goal, the rookie has gone six straight games without a point, and he hardly did anything Wednesday to provide a ‘welcome to the Stanley Cup finals’ moment.

Seguin, skating on his normal line with Chris Kelly and Michael Ryder, logged 6:21 in ice time, his lowest total this postseason and second-lowest total since coming to the NHL. He played 6:16 on February 26th, which coincidentally (or not) was also against the Canucks. Seguin did not register a shot on goal in Game 1 Wednesday.

“There’s a lot of guys that have gone scoreless in those six games as well,” coach Claude Julien said Friday when asked about Seguin. “As I mentioned earlier, he’s 19 years old. We don’t expect him to carry our team on his back.

“After the first two games in Tampa, they certainly were respectful of him a lot more than they were in the first two, they realized the damage he could make. Good players have to find ways to fight through that. This is the opportunity that Tyler has to gain even more experience in regards to that.”

The potential reward for the Bruins of having Seguin in the lineup is tremendous, and other teams are realizing it as they try to limit the rookie’s chances. It’s been a memorable and, at times, chaotic season for Seguin, and with the team trying to win the Stanley Cup, a few more good memories would be a good thing for everybody.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Claude Julien, Patrice Bergeron, Stanley Cup Finals
Mike Emrick on The Big Show: ‘I thought there was adequate evidence’ to suspend Alex Burrows at 3:23 pm ET
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Announcer Mike “Doc” Emrick, who is calling the Stanley Cup finals for NBC and Versus, joined The Big Show Friday afternoon to offer his insight into the Bruins-Canucks series while watching injured Canucks forward Manny Malhotra practice with his team in Vancouver. To hear the interview, go the The Big Show audio on demand page.

Discussing the Bruins’ struggling power play, Emrick said: “I’m not sure that there’s a solution to this problem, or the Bruins would have had it by now. So, maybe they’re just going to have to win the way they know how to win, which I thought was the way they played in Game 1.”

Added Emrick: “This is kind of like a team in the NFL winning key games with a negative rushing yardage. You just don’t see it. But then again, this has been an exceptional team that has played really well, done a lot of things just like this. There’s nothing that says if you can win a seventh game in overtime against Montreal and not score a power-play goal in any of the seven games ‘€” including overtime, when you had a power play ‘€” then maybe you’re a team of destiny. We’ll know a little more after the second game.”

Touching on the controversy involving Alex Burrows‘ alleged bite of Patrice Bergeron‘s finger, Emrick questioned the league’s decision not to suspend Burrows.

“I was surprised, because I thought there was ‘€” at least to the layman ‘€” I thought there was adequate evidence,” he said. “And I think the thing that meant more to me than actually watching the video ‘€¦ was to talk to players who were not affiliated with either Boston or Vancouver and who were retired, who know the players’ mentality. And this may seem naive, but I approached it in this way: Does he know what he’s about to do, and does he know what he’s doing when he does it? And the clear answer was yes, he does. So then, if you add that together with the video evidence, you have to say that’s suspendable.”

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Read More: Alex Burrows, Manny Malhotra, Mike Emrick, Patrice Bergeron
Regardless of age, Bruins know they might not get this opportunity again 05.27.11 at 2:01 pm ET
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At 19 years old, Tyler Seguin may be as close to the Stanley Cup as he’ll ever be.

Well, at least that’s a possibility. With the Bruins one game from a trip to the finals against the Canucks, the cliche of “you never know when you’ll be back” rings true.

“You know that that’s the case, but you’re going to do everything you can to seize the moment, seize the opportunity,” Seguin said after Friday’s morning skate in anticipation of Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals. “Obviously it’s a great opportunity, and it could be the only conference final Game 7 I ever play in, but who can predict that? Every year you just go out, work your hardest, stay focused and see what happens.”

Soon-to-be 23-year-old Milan Lucic is in a similar boat. He said after Game 6 that Friday’s game was the biggest of his and many of his teammates’ careers, and reiterated his point on Friday. In his case, there’s even more incentive to take down the Lightning at TD Garden, as a win at home would take him to his real home in Vancouver for the finals.

“You never know what can happen in the future. You look at myself, as young as I am even, you never even know if you’ll get another chance like this,” Lucic said Friday. “Especially for myself it’s a chance where if you win a game here, you get to play in your home town for the Stanley Cup. You’ve got to go out there and have fun with no regrets, and lay it all out on the line.”

In Seguin’s case, his rookie campaign has him somewhere where many of his veteran teammates have never been. He isn’t surprised by that, but he knows he and his teammates have to make the most of it.

“Obviously, coming into this year, I knew the Bruins were a Cup-contending team, and you never can predict or know what’s going to happen,” Seguin said. “You’ve just got to take advantage of everything you have, every opportunity you have. That’s what I’m doing and that’s what the team’s doing.”

The Bruins are able to appreciate that this isn’t just any opportunity. Regardless of age, it could be the only time (or the last time) they come this close to playing for a Stanley Cup. They have perhaps the best man for getting that message across to the youngsters.

“We’ve talked a lot about it. You just don’t get that opportunity all the time,” 43-year-old Mark Recchi said. “It’s tough to get to this point in this league. It’s a hard league, and there’s a lot of parity in the league. We have a chance to grab it and run with it. It’s just something you’ve really got to enjoy.”

None of the Bruins know whether they’ll ever come this far again in their careers. Their job now is to take it further.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, 7, Mark Recchi, Milan Lucic
Ed Olczyk on M&M: Put Patrice Bergeron on top power play instead of Tomas Kaberle at 1:05 pm ET
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Versus NHL analyst and former NHL center Ed Olczyk joined the Mut & Merloni show Friday to talk about the Eastern Conference finals Game 7 showdown between the Bruins and Lightning. To hear the interview, go to the Mut & Merloni audio on demand page.

Olczyk made a comment during the Game 6 broadcast on Versus about Bruins coach Claude Julien needing to mix up the lines to get more consistent offense. While he acknowledged Friday, “I think Claude has pushed a lot of the right buttons,” he stood by his analysis.

“If you look at the [David] Krejci line, with them having the majority of the success at even strength, I just kind of felt at that time, when you look up at the shot [totals] and there’s not a lot of generating going on, you look to try to change it up,” he said. “You look to add a little spark somewhere.”

Olczyk also suggested making a change on the Bruins’ power play, which has struggled all postseason.

“If you are struggling ‘€” and I think at times the Bruins have done all the right things, they just haven’t been able to score,” he said. “So, the issue is, the check and balance is, do you drastically change your personnel and load up? I think for me, I think at some point if you’re going to play Big Z [Zdeno Chara] in front of the net, I think you’ve got to put Patrice Bergeron on a point on the power play if you’re not going to play him down low because you’ve got Krejci and [Nathan] Horton and Chara down there and you’ve got [Dennis] Seidenberg and [Tomas] Kaberle. I think you load up. I think you put Patrice Bergeron on a point on the power play with Dennis Seidenberg ‘€” if that’s my first unit.”

Added Olczyk: “I would suggest loading up your first-power-play unit. And Patrice Bergeron’s got to be on that first power-play unit. I just think he has that ability. He had a quiet game [Wednesday]. I think he’s been terrific since he’s come back, but he was very quiet, probably a little too quiet in Game 6. But for me, I would put Bergeron on a point with Seidenberg. I would put Kaberle on the second unit. And I would load up with Chara, Krejci and Horton on that first power-play unit. If you’re going to go down, go down with your best guys. Go down swinging.

“But if the Bruins can play well defensively, and I think they will, I think they’ll take on the Vancouver Canucks in the Stanley Cup finals.”

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Read More: Claude Julien, David Krejci, Dwayne Roloson, Ed Olczyk
Bruins-Lightning Game 7: 7 things B’s must do at 1:47 am ET
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The Bruins are hours away from either the Stanley Cup finals or the end of their season. Sticking with our “seven” theme, here are seven of the many things the B’s should do as they look to take Game 7 vs. the Lightning.

– Get the same first line they got in Game 6: The trio of Milan Lucic, David Krejci and Nathan Horton were an absolute handful for the Lightning on Wednesday. Krejci had a hat trick, while a shift late in the third period had the line threatening to tie the game on great opportunities for Krejci and Horton. Lucic scored the Bruins’€™ first goal of the game, and all three members of the line had multi-point nights.

– Limit the penalties or stop Tampa’€™s power play: The Bruins shut down Tampa’€™s power play in three straight games (nine power plays), but the Lightning figured it out in Game 6 to the tune of three tallies on the man advantage. As a result, the B’€™s will look to stay out of the box to avoid giving guys like Steven Stamkos and Martin St. Louis those chances. A penalty like Tomas Kaberle‘€™s interference of Ryan Malone in the third period is easily avoidable.

– Capitalize on Dwayne Roloson: The Bruins’€™ top line went hard after Tampa’€™s netminder in the shift that followed Krejci’€™s third goal, and on a night in which Roloson didn’€™t look very good, they probably wish they had a few more minutes to tie it up. Roloson entered the series with the best postseason save percentage and goals against average, but he has been yanked twice, sat once, and has an .851 save percentage in five games in the Conference Finals.

– Play Tyler Seguin on the second power play unit: If fans had their way, Tyler Seguin would center a line with Tyler Seguin and Tyler Seguin on the wings, and Tyler Seguin and Tyler Seguin playing defense in front of goaltender Tyler Seguin. People think he’€™s the magical solution to everything, and they overlook the fact that he still a work in progress with his overall game and the fact that he often will give up on a play before taking contact. With that being said, Seguin belongs on the power play. His offensive skill set and lack of everything else means his time is best spent on the man advantage.

– Get a lead and hold it. The Bruins have led in two of the three games they have lost this round.

– Get the Patrice Bergeron they are used to. Much was made prior to the series of how the B’€™s could play without Bergeron, and though they split the two games in which Bergeron was out with a concussion, he saw Wednesday that they lose without him. Bergeron had zero shots on the night and was a minus-1. Bergeron did have three points over the previous two games, but Wednesday was a forgettable night for the assistant captain.

– Make sure they know where Simon Gagne is: It’€™s a Game 7 against the Bruins and he’€™s playing in it’€¦ need we say more? Gagne has three goals this series against the B’€™s after racking up four in four games vs. Boston in the second round last year.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, 7, Dwayne Roloson, Tomas Kaberle
Bruins-Lightning Game 7: 7 players to keep an eye on at 1:23 am ET
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It’s only appropriate that we get carried away with the number seven with the Bruins and Lightning set to square off in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals Friday. Here are seven players to keep an eye on.

Dwayne Roloson: Make no mistake about it ‘€“ Roloson was bad in Game 6. So bad that the Bruins really have to be frustrated that Tampa limited them to only 19 shots. Asked after the game to assess his goaltender’€™s performance, Guy Boucher replied, ‘€œwe won.’€

Tim Thomas: The Vezina favorite has allowed at least four goals in four of the series’€™ six games thus far, but his Game 5 performance was even more impressive than his Game 3 shutout. Thomas has been human too often in this series, and he’€™ll need to rise to the occasion with an otherworldly performance in Game 7.

Steven Stamkos: Look who woke up. After being a ghost in Game 3 and going both Game 3 and 4 without a point, the Lightning’€™s leading goal-scorer in the regular season contributed a goal and a pair of assists in Game 6. It marked the second time this series that Stamkos has had three points in Game.

Here are the numbers for Stamkos in Games 2 and 6: 2 G, 4 A, 11 SOG.
And the his stats in Games 1, 3, 4 and 5: 0 G, 1 A, 7 SOG.

Tyler Seguin: Remember him? Seguin scored his first postseason goal in Game 1, took over the second period in Game 2 and looked like a savvy veteran in Game 3. Since then, he’€™s done little and has been given the appropriate ice time as a result. He might be the most talented player in this series, but he needs to stop going out of his way to avoid contact. If Seguin’€™s gift can take over, he could be Boston’€™s secret weapon again. Otherwise, it could be back to the fourth line for the rookie.

Johnny Boychuk: Oof. It’€™s been bad for Boychuk this series. The 27-year-old was on the ice for all five of Tampa’€™s goals in Game 6, and his shakey showing in the second round also led to a minus-3 rating in Boston’€™s 6-5 win in Game 2.

Sean Bergenheim: Before leaving Game 5 with a lower-body injury, Bergenheim led all postseason players with nine goals in the playoffs. He missed Game 6 with the undisclosed injury, but skated earlier in the day on Wednesday. If he returns to Tampa’€™s lineup, the B’€™s would have to worry about a guy who’€™s already burned them twice this series. Boucher said Thursday that Bergenheim’€™s status ‘€œdoesn’€™t necessarily look like something positive’€ for the Lightning.

Mark Recchi: This could very well be Recchi’€™s last game should the Bruins lose and he opt to retire in the offseason, and it would be a tough way to go if he kept up his production-less streak. The second-line winger had zero points this series, is a minus-5 and has totaled just six shots on net in six games.

Read More: 2011 Stanley Cup Playoffs, 7, Dwayne Roloson, Johnny Boychuk
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